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UNIVERSITY 
OF FLORIDA 
LIBRARIES 




Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2010 with funding from 

University of Florida, George A. Smathers Libraries with support from Lyrasis and the Sloan Foundation 



http://www.archive.org/details/canalrecord7152isth 



CANAL 




RECORD 



PUBLISHED WEEKLY UNDER 
THE AUTHORITY AND SUPER- 
VISION OF THE PANAMA CANAL 



AUGUST 27, 1913, TO AUGUST 19, 1914 



VOLUME VII 



WITH INDEX 



THE PANAMA CANAL 
BALBOA HEIGHTS, CANAL ZONE 

1914. 



THE PANAMA CANAL PRINTING PRESS 

MOUNT HOPE, CANAL ZONE 

1914. 



H' 



INDEX. 



ABSENCE reports, 334. 368, 392. 479. 

Accidents, fatal, 3. 30. 54, 55. 78, 114, 207. 261. 298, 

363. 387. 398. 415. 
Accountable Officers. 87, 131. 139. 159, 179, 231. 278. 
288, 295, 307. 315, 334, 348. 358. 421, 430. 439, 454. 
462. 470, 490, 506. 518. 
Accounting Department: 

Auditor, assistant, appointment. 289. 

Organization. 235. 305, 365. 

See also Governor's reports, monthly, 4b. 80. 125. 
165, 217, 257, 303. 342. 
Acccunting Division, commissary. 250. 
Accounts, general. 202. 479. 
Acetylene as, charges, 31. 
Acts of Congress, See Congress. 
Admeasurement Board: 

Appointment, 344, 526. 

Witnesses, oaths and attendance, 487. 
Admeasurement, steamship. 193-200, 475. 
Administration Building: 

Panama. 206. 249. 

Permanent. Balboa. 92, 245. 465. 
Age limit, employes', 356. 
Agricultural bulletins. New York. 523. 
Air compressors, transfer, 337. 
Air service, transfer. 438. 
Alaska Railroad. 105. 319. 

American-Hawaiian S. S. Co., 337. 373, 385, 409. 
American Institute of Electrical Engineers. 142, 216, 

270, 274. 310. 339. 398, 447, 512. 
American Society of Civil Engineers, visit, 91. 
Animals, Isthmian, collection, 261. 
Annual reports, material, 430. 
Appropriation Acts, 381. 518, 526. 
Appropriation Committee, visit, 108. 
Aquatic meet, 12, 135, 256. 
Arango. Ricardo M., obituary, 221. 
Army, hospital treatment, 366, 416. 
Artificial limbs, 124, 545. 
Artisans, transfer, 39, 356, 393. 
Asphalt mixing plant, 265, 415. 
Aspinwali hotel, 91. 184. 205. 211, 263, 348, 423. 
Association of Panama Canal Builders, 27, 35, 221. 
Athletic meet. Labor Day, 12. 
Atlantic Division: 

Abolished, 211, 221. 

Electrical work, transfer, 65. 

Engineer, acting, 75. 

Work, review, 221. 
Attorney, appointments. 323, 365, 369. 
Auditor, duties, 365. 
Automobiles; 

Chauffeurs, licensing, 266, 403-8. 

Licenses issued, number, 214. 

Tariff. 171, 179. 



Baggage: 

Customs, 237. 

Panama raikoad, 153, 240, 312, 421. 
Bail bonds, 30. 
Balboa: 

Buildings, permanent. 512. 

Terminals, layout, 254-6. 

Townsite, plan. 153. 276-7. 
Barge, sightseeing. 189. 206. 
Barges, steel, contract. 161, 189. 225, 289, 37 
Barges towed through Canal, 373. 385. 409. 
Barrett, John, visit, 522. 
Bartlett, H. E. resignation. 158. 
Bathing in Canal, 150. 
Battleships, visit, I, 206. 350, 412. 
Baxter. W. M. Jr., resignation, 458. 
Bench marks, 366. 

Beverley. Dr. E. P., resignation. 158. 
Beyer, Walter F., resignation, 494. 
Bills: 

Approval, 393. 

Payment by steamship companies, 350. 

Preparation and rendition, 365. 
Binders, circulars, 334. 



Bird protection, 5. 

Species, 219. 
Bimie. Joseph, resignation. 466. 
Bishop, Joseph Bucklin, resignation, 446. 
Blueprints, sale and preservation, 167, 345. 
Board of Health, 523. 

Boiler inspection, rules and regulations, 48C-2. 
Boiler inspectors, appointments, 344, 526. 
Boggs. Major F. C, appointment, 289. 
Bonds, employes". 365, 493.. 
Boundary monuments. 366. 
Bovay, Harry E.. resignation. 434. 
Boy scouts, flag raising, 182. 
Brake service charges, 14. 
Breakwaters; 

Construction, resumd, 376. 

Cost statements. Part 3, Nos. 19, 36. 

Limon Bay. 56, 246. 513. 

Naos Island. 49. 113. 

Work, transfer. 211. 438. 454. 

See also Governor's reports, monthly, 45. SO, 125, 
165. 217, 257, 3C3, 342, 389. 449, 488. 
Briberj'. 229. 
Brick laying record. 289. 
Bridges; 

Calidonia, footwalk, 433. 

Chagres River, Gamboa. 233. 

Dry dock site, 184. 

French Canal. Cristobal, 141, 254. 

Gatun River, bascule. 122. 

Paraiso, removable span, 18. 

Pontoon, crossing Canal, 17, 121, 141, 190. 213, 
245. 289. 349. 362. 379. 

Suspension. Empire, removal. 361. 369. 
Brown. Jr., Thomas Edwin, resignation. 446. 
Bubonic plague, 269. 361, 397. 446. 
Bunau-Varilla. M. Philippe, visits, 67. 487. 
Buoys, gas. 168, 206. 
Burial permits. t3. 
Burke. John, 236. 312, 415. 
Busses, motor, 5l0. 
Butler, Major Smedley D., detail, 215. 



Cable pulling record. 1. 

Cableways, Gatun locks, removal, 222. 

Caissons, lock entrance, 136-8. 201. 376. 509. 

CaUdonia bridge, footwalk, 433. 

Canal : 

Act effective, 213. 

Commissioner, appointment, 5. 

Earnings, 409. 

Opening. 181. 373, 3S5. 399, 485. 493. 521. 

Operation and navigation, 497-504. 

Organization, permanent, 213, 233, 235. 281, 285. 

Sailing directions, 523-6. 
Canal Record, organization, 365. 
Cano saddle dike. 103. 112, 133, 173, 364. 
Captains, of Ports: 

Appointments. 7. 14, 281, 298, 369. 

Duties, 416. 

Offices esUblished. 349, 
Cement: 

Bags, invoicing and care. 103. 139, 517. 

Consumption, comparison. 496. 

Storage shed, Gatun. dismantled. 379. 
Cemetery : 

Burial permits, 83. 

Disposiiion of bodies, 187, 295. 345. 

Permanent. Corozal, 245. 
Census. Canal Zone. 426. 468-9. 

Central American Construction Company, receiver ap- 
pointed. 292. 
Central Division: 

Abolished. 49, 51. 

Accountant, chief, appointment, 14. 

Office building abandoned, 113. 

Sections, changes, 31. 
Charges River: 

Bridge, Gamboa, 233. 

Gravel, 141, 173, 176. 179. 293. 

Pumping station, Gamboa, 11. 

Stages. See each issue. 

Villages, health conditions. 5. 21. 



Chagres Society. 74. 191. 207. 274. 339, 512. 

Chairman and Chief Engineer, acting, 250. 

Chaplains, force reduction, 117. 

Charts, sailing. 318. 391. 

Chauffeurs, licensing. 266, 403-8. 

Chilibre Land and Timber Company, rafting logs to 

Gambol, 77. 
Chiriqui railroad. 234, 414. 
Christian Endeavor Society, 227, 247, 339. 
Christian Science meetings, 510. 
Christmas services, 158, 163. 

Church: 

Bazaar, 505. 522. 

Bible Society, 99, 118. 

Building lots, 382, 411, 511, 

ChorriUo, Baptist, opening, 311, 467. 

Christmas services, 158, 163. 

Easter services, 311. 

Foreign Missionary Society. 13. 22, 44, 99, 135 

143. 
Guachapali. Baptist, dedicated, 274. 283. 
Lenten services, 247. 
Ministers' Association. 118. 
Seventh Day Adventists. 267. 
Sunday School Associition. 74, 182, 191, 299, 311, 

460, 467. 

Circulars, official: 

Absence reports, 334, 358, 392, 479. 
Accountable officers, 87, 131, 139, 159. 179, 231, 
278, 288. 295. 307. 315, 334. 348, 358, 421, 430. 
439, 454. 462. 470, 490, 506. 518. 
Accounting Department, organization, 305, 365. 
Accounting Division, commissary, 250. 
Accounts, general, 202, 479. 
Acetylene gas, charges, 31. 
Admeasurement board, appointment, 344, 526. 
Age limit, employes", 356. 
Air ser\'ice, transfer. 438. 
Annual reports, material, 430. 
Appropriations, 381, 518. 526, 
Army, hospital treatment, 366, 4l6. 
Artificial limbs, 345. 
Artisans, transfer, 39, 356, 393. 
Atlantic Division: 

Abolished. 211. 

Engineer, acting, 75. 
Attorney, special, appointment, 323, 365. 
Auditor, duties, 365. 
Automobile tariff, 171, 179. 
Bathing in Canal. 150. 
Bench marks, 366. 
Bills: 

Approval, 393. 

Prepar-iitiou and rendition, 365. 
Binders, 334. 
Blueprints, sale. 345. 
Boiler inspection, 480-2. 

Sec also steamship inspection. 
Boiler inspectors, appointments, 344, 526. 
Bonds, employes", 365. 
Boundary' monuments. 366. 
Brake service, charges. 14. 
Bread Ghipmtnts. commissary. 433. 
Breakwater work tran^ferreJ. 211. 438, 454. 
BridL-e. Empire, suspc^nsion, removal, 369. 
Building on public lands, 344. 
Caua! Record, organization, 365. 
Captain of ports: 

Appointments, 7, 14, 369. 

Duties, 410. 
Cement bags, invoicing and care, 103, 139, 517. 
Central Division: 

Abolished, 51. 

Accountant, chief, appointment, 14. 

Sections changed, 31. 
Chairman and Chief Engineer: 

Acting. 250. 

Chief Clerk, acting. 87. 

Inspector, appointment, 95. 
Chauffeurs, examination, 403-8. 
Chicc'go House Wrecking Co., work for. 111. 
Church building lots, 382. 
Citizenship, employes', 355. 



INDEX 



Circulars, official: 

Civil Administration Department, accountable 

officer. 288. 
Civil affairs, division, organization. 31j. 3bS. 
Civil Service rules, amendment. 526. 
Coal: 

Handling plant, engineer in charge, 369. 
Purchase. 369. 
Waste in unloading. 39. 
Cold storaee. delivery, 7. 
Collector, duties. 365. 
Commissary: 

Accountine. 3oS. 

Accounting division, transfer, 250. 
Coupon books. 51. 171. 223, 366. 443, 454. 
Manager, acting, 139. 
Commissary and Subsistence Department: 

Assistant Chief Clerk, appointment, 271. 
Chir.f Clerk, appointment. 271. 
Complaints, employes", 346. 

Conduct and efficiency ratings, 271, 393. 490. 
Congress, legislation. See Congress. 
Construction Division: 
Organization, 355. 
Work transfer, 438. 
Consular Corps, hospital treatment. 366. 
Contractors, hospital treatment, 366, 416. 
Contracts, preparation, 87, 346. 
Corral charges, 416. 430. 
Correspondence, preparation, 171, 368. 
Coupon books. 51. 171. 223, 366, 443. 454. 
Courts, organization. 305, 315. 365. 
Cremation of bodies. 187, 295, 345. 
Debts, employes', 346. 
Demurrage. Ci r. 242. 
Dentists. 346. 

Deportation of invalids, 346. 
Depot Quartermaster, appointment, 51, 150. 
Deputy Collector of Revenues, acting. 23. 
Dike, Gatun locks, track- removal. 7. 
Diplomatic Corps, liospital treatment, 366, 416. 
Disbursing office cashier, appointment, 31. 
Discharge ot employes, 393. 
Discipline oi employes, 340. 
District Attorney, appointment. 365, 369. 
District Quartermaster, changes. 15, 187. 
Docks, rules governing design and construction, 

111, 417. 
Drawings, mailing, 31. 
Dredges, positions on, 392. 
Dredging division, organization, 211, 306. 
Dry dock, Cristobal, rates, for use, 119. 
Dumps, Balboa, work transfer, 438, 454. 
Electric current, rates, 295, 506. 
Electric transmission line, energization, 439. 
Electrical and Mechanical Engineer, acting, 392. 
Electrical Division, organization, 306, 355. 367. 
Employes, gold, list, 315. 
Engine failures, 480. 
Equipment: 

Disposition and preservation. 39. 63. 05_ ]03, 

231. 
Floating, appraisal, 403. 
Interference with use, 344. 
Purchase, 382. 
Rental, rates, 479. 
Retirement, 470. 

Sales, rules governing, 6, 392, 438. 
Stock reduction, 36). 
Survey requests, 6. 103. 223, 381. 
Transfer and marking, 356. 
Transfer requests, 2.S8. 356. 
Turned into stores. 344. 
Erection Division: 
Abolished, 470. 
Accountable officer, 334, 470. 
Organization, 306. 
Excuse cards. 334. 358, 392, 479. 
Executive Department, organization. 365. 
Executive Office: 

Bureau heads, 358. 
Chief Clerk, appointment, M3. 
Organization. 305-0, 315. 365. 
Executive Orders, drafts, 526, 
Expenditures: 

Accounts, classified, 7, 150. 
Approval, 393. 

Personal, reimbursement, 202, 380, 4S0. 
Fifth Division: 

Abolished, 211. 

Accountable officer, I3i, 139. )50. 
Acting head, 87. 
Fire drills, volunteer companies, 309. 
tire CMuipniePt. buildings, 95. 
Fire Protection Division. Sec Police and Fire 

Division. 
Floating equipment, appraisal, 403. 
Floaiing shop, rates for use, 179. 
Force reijorts, issuance. 454. 
Foremen, force reduction, 131. 



Circulars, official: i 

Foremen's orders, 482. 
Fortifications: 

Accountable officer, 334, 454. 
Assistant Engineer, appointment, 439. 
Organization, 306. 
Reservations, 75, 393. 
Visitors, 75. 
Fourth Division: 

Accountable officer. 179. 
Personnel changes, 179. 
Work assigned, 21 1. 
French property, inventory, 6. 
Furlough pending reemployment, 393. 
Furniture, inspection board, 242. 
Gamboa dike tracks, 14. 
Gravel : 

Handling, i^lant, Gamboa, 179. 
Measurements, standard, 344. 394. 430. 
Hand cars, rules governing use, 242. 344. 
Health Department, organization, 305, 517. 
Holidays. 87. Ill, 159. 242, 295, 382. 
Hospi Lai : 

Choice, privilege discontinued, 103. 
Colon, accommodations reduced. 111. 
Farm. Corozal, 333. 
Patients, chronic, disposition, 103. 
Santo Tomas. 333. 392. 
Treatment, rules, governing, 366, 394, 416. 
Visitors' hours, 139, 
Hotel: 

Accounting, .'08. 

Asp nwall, rates and rules. 211, 263. 
Coupon books, 366, 454. 
Hours, work ng, 179. 356. 
Household goods, shipment, 51, 231. 470. 
HuL in pectors, appointment, 344, 526. 
Hunting in Canal Zone. 171, 346. 
Hydroelectric, station, transfer, 442. 
Ice deliverj, . 7, 443. 
Identification certificates, 490. 
Income tax law, 241-2. 
Increase of force papers, 369, 417. 
Inflammable liquids, 346. 
Injury clamis, 393. 

Insane, hospital treatment, 366, 394, 416. 
Interments and cremation of bodies, 187, 295, 345. 
Invalids, deportation, 346. 
Issuance and publication, -345, 369, 430. 
Judson, Lieut.-Col. W. V., transfer, 315. 
Jury list. 506. 
Labor surcharge, 6. 
Laborers: 

Employment and promotion, 159. 
Hours of work, 179. 
Name and check numbers, 480. 
Transfer, 103. 
Launch trips for masters and mates, 31, 63. 
Leave : 

Accrued, 15, 295, 307. 315, 334. 429. 

Aliens. 295. 

Conditions, general. 295, 306. 334. 344, 358, 

369, 392, 394. 470. 479, 506. 
Invoicing, 15, 139. 
Quarters, retention, 202, 369. 
Relief days^ 344, 369. 
Reports. 334. 358. 392. 479. 
Requests, form, 392. 
Sick, less half day, 334. 
Termination of service, 202, 364, 394, 470, 

506. 
Transfer slips, 15, 139. 
See also Executive Orders, 228, 265. 
Lepers, hospital treatment, 334. 366, 394, 416. 
Level rods, unserviceable, 231. 
Licenses, rules and regulations, 403-8. 
Lighthouse Division, organization, 306. 
Limbs, artificial, 345. 
Local Inspectors: 

Appointments, 111, 223, 344, 526. 
Steamship inspection, 4C3-8. 
Lock work, Gatun. transfer, 75. 
Locks: 

.'Accountable officer. 470. 490, 506. 
Miraflorcs, construction bridge, removal. 150. 
Permits to visit. 394. 
Superhitendcnls, 370, 430. 
Locomotive: 

Failures, 480. 

Service charges, invoicing, 223. 
Lottcri' tickets, sale lorbidden, 340. 
Lubricants, standard, 14, 103, 111,* 439-42. 
Magistrates courts, 306, 315. 
Mariner's notices. 131. 417, 430, 479. 490. 526. 
Material. See Equipment. 
Meal tickets, issuance, 366, 454. 
Meclianical Division: 

-■Vccountable officer. 278, 307. 
Duties, 382. 



Circulars, official: 

Organization, 306. 
Personnel changes. 111. 
Shops, transfer, 250. 
Superintendent, appointment, 231. 
Medical storekeeper, accountable officer, 358. 
Medical treatment requests, 95. 
Memorandum receipts, preparation, 307. 
Messes, accounting, 308. 
Metal cliecks. 454, 462. 479. 
Military reservations, 75, 393. 
Moneys received, disposition, 381. 
Motor boat navigator examination, 403-8. 
Municipal Engineering Division: 
Chemist, water analysis, 394. 
Organization, 306. 
Superintendents, acting, 39, 430. 
Navigation aids, notices. 131. 417, 430, 479,490, 

526. 
Nepotism, 346. 
Notaries public, 39, 416. 
Number, list, 430. 
Oil drums, accounting, 517. 
Oil houses, transfer, 14. 

Oils and lubricants, standard, 14, 103. 111,439-42. 
Operation and Maintenance Department orgari- 

zation, 305, 306. 355. 
Oxygen gas. charges, 31. 
Panama, charges and credits, 368. 
Par ama Railroad. See Panama Railroad. 
Parcel post packages, 334. 490. 
Patients, chronic, disposition, 103. 
Pay: 

Car, schedule. 102, 139, 343. 
Receipts, unclaimed, 139. 
Reduction, 346. 
Rolls approval. 393. 
Paymaster, duties. 365. 
Payment for services, for vessels, employes, and 

others, 416. 
Penitentiary, rules, 203. 
Photographs, issuance and sale, 345. 
Physical examination, 346, 356. ^ 
Pilot service, 416. 517. 
Pilots, examination and applications, 242. 2^0, 

403-8. 
Plumbing work, 357. 

Police and Fire Division, organization, 315, 365. 
Police and Prisons, Division: 

Assistant Chief, appointment, 150. 
Chief, acting. 171. 
Police stations, 171. 179. 
Port Captains: 

Appointments, 7. 14. 369. 
. Duties. 416. 
Posts, Division: 

Abolished. 438. 
Inspector, acting, 31. 
Offices, 295, 33a. 
Organization, 315, 365. 
Prisoners, rules governing, 203. 
Private business during working hours. 150. 
Profane and abusive language, 346. 
Promotions, 345, 350. 
Property: 

Accountable officers, 87, 131, 139, 159, 179. 
231. 278, 288. 295, 307. 315, 334. 348, 3S8, 
421. 430, 439, 454, 462. 470, 490, 506. 
Accounting, 187, 263. 307, 368. 514. 
Foremen's orders, 482. 
French, inventory, 6. 

Memorandum receipts, 307. 
Nonexpendable. 223, 307, 514-7. 
Private, rights, 393. 
Release, 179, 462, 479. 
Returns, receiving and auditing, 179. 
Survey requests. 6. 103, 223. 381. 
Transfer requests. 288. 
Publication, 345. 369, 430. 
Purchasing Agent, appointment. 51. 150. 
Purchasing Department, organization. 305. 
Quarantire rules and regulations. 418-21. 
Quarr>' work, transfer, 211, 421. 
Quartermaster's Department: 

Chief. Assistant, appointment. 39, 
Depot Quartermaster, appointment, 51, ISO. 
District Quartermasters, changes. 15, 187. 
Purchasing Agent, appointment. 51, 150. 
Quarters: 

Applications, list, 369. 
Release, 202, 4o2, 479. 
Rental, silver employes, 187, 345, 438. 
Retention during leave, 202, 369. 
Ratings and rates of pay. 103, 111, 139, 159, 179. 

211, 250. 323, 357-S. 370. 402-3. 
Records, preservation, 334. 
Red Cross ball, 14. 
Reduction in force, 345, 393. 
Reemployment, 350. 381. 
Relatives, employment, 346. 



INDEX 



Circulars, official; 

Reports, annual, material, 430. 

Reservations, military, 75, 393. 

Responsibilities of employes. 365. 

Sand, standard measurements. 344, 394. 430. 

Sand service, Miraflores, transfer, 438. 

Sanitary Department, Chief Officer, acting. 75. 

Santo Tomas hospital 332, 392. 

School: 

Holidays, 111. 139. 

Hours, change. 103. 

Organization, 315, 365. 

Superintendent, appointment. 87. 
Scrap: 

Brass and copper, handlins^, 87. 

Credits allowed. 179. 

Recover>', 231, 355. 
Seamen. American, hospital treatment, 366, 416. 
Second Division: 

Accountable officer. 131, 139. 

Superintendent of Transportation, acting, 211. 

Work assigned. 211. 
Seniority, employes'. 345, 393. 
Ser\-ice records. 271. 393. 490. 
Shipments: 

Employes'. 51. 231. .^34. 

Household goods. 51, 231. 470. 

Instructions and claims for losses, 439. 

Sample, 6. 
Shops : 

E.Kpense percentage, 6. 103. 

Floating, rates for use, 179. 

General Foreman. Balboa, acting, 455. 

Permanent, designation. 6. 

Transfer. 250. 
Shovels, standard, 51, 392. 
Sixth Division: 

Accountable officer. 131. 139. 

Designated Dredging Division, 211. 
Stationery forms, standard, 307, 367. 
Steamships: 

Alterations to prevent accidents in Canal, 382. 

Inspection. 403-8. 490. 

Transportation and rates, 263. 344. 380. 
Steamshovel engineers and crancmen, extra, 139. 
Stone, stand rd measurements. 344. 394, 430. 
Store. Brlboa. accountable officer, 231, 295. 
Subsistence, employes on floating equipment, 490. 
Subsistence Department: 

Accountable officer, 295. 

Officer, appointment, 250. 288. 
Supply Department: 

Inspector, special, appointment. 421. 

Organization, 305, 335. 
Surcharge: 

Labor, 0. 

Material sales, 250, 438. 
Survey and Appraisal Board, 31, 119. 
Survey requests, 6, 103. 223, 381. 
Surveving Officer, appointment and duties, 344, 

392. 393. 
Suspension and reprimand, 346. 
Swimming in Canal, 150. 
Telephones. 278, 315. 455. 
Terminal Construction Division: 

Accountable officers. 334, 430, 462. 

Organization. 306. 
Termination of service papers, 51, 242. 358, 442. 

462, 479. 
Ties, railroad, second-hand, 150. 
Tiraebooks, 223, 454, 491. 
Timekeeper. Chief, mail address, 470. 
Timekeeper: 

Consolidation. 211, 462. 

Inspector, appointment, 63. 
Time vouchers, 75. 526. 
Tolls, exemption, repeal. 470. 
Tonnage certificates, 418. 
Tracings, mailing. 31. 
Trackspan bridges, climbing. 430. 
Transfer slips. 15. Ill, 506. 
Transfers, 345. 356. 470. 
Transmission line, energization, 439. 
Transportation : 

Labor gangs, 231. 

Panama railroad. 171. 430. 442. 

Steamship, 263, 344, 380. 
Transportation Department, changes. 75. 
Transportation Division, organization, 306. 
Traveling engineer, duties. 381. 
Traveling expenses. 202, 380, 480. 
\'acation. See Leave. 
Vouchers, approval, 393. 
Wage scales, 103. Ill, 139, 179. 211, 250. 323. 

357-8. 370, 402-3. 
Washington office, organization. 305. 
Waste, standard, 439-42. 
Water and air service, transfer, 438. 



Circulars, official: 

W'ater, rules and regulations, 14. 355. 

Wharv'es. design Lrd construction. Ill, 417. 

Wildman, Maj. L. D.. detail, 442. 

Wireless station. Darien, 369. 

Women, employment, 356. 

Work for emplo^es and others. 202, 21). 344. 

Work requests. 87. 95. 355. 370. 381. 416. 506. 

Wrecking crane, charges. 278. 
Circuit Courts, last sessions, 313. 
Citizenship, employes", 355. 
Civil Administration Department, pccountable officer, 

288. 
Civil Affairs. Division, organization, 315, 365. 

Civil Service: 

Examination notices, 30. 42, 157, 221. 226, 227, 
274, 291, 399. 434. 458, 505. 

Rules, amendment. 526. 
Clubhouses, V. M. C. A: 

Balboa, recreation, 105. 

Colored, Culebra. 35. 

Culebra. anniversary and closing. 387. 

Privileges for Tenth Infantrj'men, 479. 
See also each issue. 

Coal: 

Consumption reduced, 97. 

Handhng plants, 20-1, 129. 369, 376, 457. 

Purchase, 369. 

See also Governor's reports, monthly, 45. 80. 
125, 165. 217. 257. 303, 342, 389. 449. 488, 

Storage rent, private dealers, 25. 

Trantportation, 124, 

Wharf, temporary. 457. 

Waste, 39. 
Coast Artillery, arrival. 164. 398. 
Coca Cola bottling works, removal, 293. 
Cold storage deliver>', 7. 
Cold storage prices. See each issue. 
Cole, Harr>' O., resignation. 215. 
Collector, duties. 365. 
Collier Ceci7 wrecked. 273. 282. 
Colliers, contract let. 341. 378. 
Colombia, employment. 122. 
Columbus Day exercises. 55. 
Colon: 

Extension, 216. 

Water main extension, 1. 

Water supply. 141. 
Commissary" 

Accounting Division, transfer, 250. 

Accounting, 368. 

Ancon, building, 25, 155. 396, 431. 

Balboa. 512. 

Bread shipments. 443. 

Bulletins, weekly. 360. 371. 396, 423, 431, 443, 
453, 463. 471. 483. 491. 507, 519. 527. 

Cold storage prices. See each issue. 

Coupon books. 51, 171, 223, 321, 366, 423. 443. 
454. 

Cristobal, changes. 327. 

Ice. deliver!' and sale. 7, 396, 443, 519. 

Inventory, 491. 

Manager, acting, 139. 

Manager suspended and indicted. 236. 312. 415. 

Offices, transfer, 396. 

Orders, special, 431. 

Organization. 443. 452. 

Pedro Miguel, ice box. 183. 

Privilege, 465. 

Reports, monthly and fiscal year, 169, 443. 

Salesmen, instructions, 452. 

Storehouse, 371. 

Suggestions from patrons. 360. 
Commissary and Subsistence Department: 

Assistant Chief Clerk, appointment, 271. 

Chief Clerk, appointment, 271. 
Complaints, employes. 346. 
Concrete: 

Blocks, manufacture. 260. 

Cableways. Gatun Locks, removal, 222. 

Locks, completion and records, 3b. 

Materials, consumption comparison. 496. 

Mixers ordered, 397. 

Mixer record, 44. 

Plant, portable, 320. 

Records, 2. 10, 18. 28, 37. 42. 54. 67. 68. 78. 93. 
116, 118, 15b. 161. 164, 201. 208, 246, 248. 284. 
292,309,329.388,436. 

Tile blocks, manufacture. 117, 184. 
Conduct and efficiency rating'?, 271, 393. 490. 
Congress, legislation: 

Alaska railroad. 105, 319. 

Appropriation. 381, 518, 526. 

Canal Act, 213. 

Income tax, 241-2. 

McClintic-Marshall Construction Company claim, 
investigation, 476. 

Opium, importation and use. 469. 

Tolls, exemption, repeal, 470. 



Constables, duties, 523. 
Construction Division: 

Organization, 355. 

Work transfer, 438. 
Consular Corps: 

Directory. 24, 62. 106, 190, 285. 386. 447. 

Hospital treatment. 366, 416. 
Contractors, hospital treatment, 366. 416. 
Contracts, preparation, 87, 346. 
Cooke, Thomas M.. resignation, 298. 
Corral charges. 416. 430. 

Correspondence, official, preparation, 171. 368. 
Cost statements. Part 2, Nos. 19. 36. 
Costa Rica, employment, 99. 
Cotton, hybrid, < xperiments, 299. 
Counterfeit money. 92. 

Couplings, dredge pipelines, 89, 261. ' 

Coupon books. 51, 171, 223. 321, 366. 443, 454. 
Courts: 

Circuit, la&t sessions. 313. 

Constables, duties. 523. 

Decisions, volume, 321. 

District clerk, duties. 475. 

Organization. 305-6, 315, 365. 

Review, 313. 

Supreme, last session. 445. 

See also Governor's reports, monthly. 45, 80, 
125, 165,217, 257.303,342.389.449.488. 
Crane boat, passage through Canal, 181. 
Cranes: 

Cargo handling, motors, 317. 

Floating, 292, 378, 397, 465, 485. 

Wrecking, disposition, 138. 
Cremation, bodies. 187. 240. 295, 345. 
Crematory building. 89. 240. 
Cresson, \\'illiam P.. appointment, 510. 
Criminal procedure, amendment. 30. 
Critchlow, Howard T., resignation, 319. 
Cruces, history, 73. 
Cuba, laborers wanted, 142. 
Culebra Cut: 

Drainage, 1 . 25. 

Dredge wharf. Paraiso, 134. 

Dredging. 53. 65-6. 77. 89. 105. 115. 121. 134, 141. 
153. 161. 181. 189, 205. 213, 254, 265, 373, 374. 

Flooding, 1-2. 17. 25, 41, 53, 65-6, 77. 

Grader, hydraulic, 321, 509. 

Navigation prohibited, 73. 

Observation platform, 138, 181. 

Slide, west bank. 385. 

Sluicing, 77, 115, 213, 222, 246, 254. 321, 374, 509. 

Steamshovel operations, 1, 17, 25, 121, 157, 201, 
274, 289, 374. 

Water, rate of rise, 77-8. 
Curundu River culvert, 129, 269, 325. 
Customs, baggage, 237. 

D 
Dairy inspection. 428. 

Dams: 

Cost statements. Part 2, Nos. 19, 36. 

Emergency, 374. 494. 

Fill placed, monthly, 28. 68. 116, 156, 208, 248. 
284. 329, 388. 436. 

Fills, 375. 

Gatun. completion, 161, 289. 
Darling, Dr. S. T.. to South Africa, 67. 164. 
Debts, employes'. 346. 
Deeks, Dr. W. E.. resignation. 267. 
Demurrage system and rates, P. R. R., 213, 242. 
Dentists, 34o. 

Depopulation of the Zone, 378. 
Deportation of invalids. 346. 
Deported persons, return. 67. 
Depot Quartermaster, appointment. 51, 150. 
Deputy Collector of Revenues, appointment. 23. 
Deshon, Lieut. -Col. George D.. appointment, 293. 
Detroit, opportunities. 134, 182, 192. 
Devol, Brig.-Gen. C. A., visit. 267. 
Diablo demolished. 233. 

Dickson, Lieut. -Col. Tracy C, resignation, 277. 
Dike: 

Gamboa. removal, 1-2. 14, 25. 41. 53. 65-6. 77. 

Gatun Lake. Cano saddle. 103. 112. 133. 173. 364. 

Gatun locks, removal, 7. 17. 

Miraflores. removal, 1. 9. 

Rio Grande. 205. 
Diplomatic Corps: 

Directory, 24. ICo. 

Hospital treatment. 366. 416. 

Secretary of American Legation. ap,>ointment. 510. 

American Minister, appointment. 56. 74. 
Directory : 

Canal officials. 8. 151. 464. 

Consular Corps. 24. 62. 105. 190, 285, 386, 447. 

Diplomatic Corps, 24. 106, 5lO. 
Disbursing Office Cashier, appointment, 31. 
Discharge, employes", 393. 
DiscipHne, employes'. 346. 
Dispensary: 

Bas Obispo and Las Cascadas closed, 201. 



INDEX 



Dispensary: 

Tivoli, consolidation, 33S. 
District Attorney, appointment, 2S9, 365. 369. 
District Quartermasters, changes, 15, 187. 
Diversion, Rio Grande, 1, 9. 205. 317. 
Docks. See Wharves. 
Drawings, mailing, 31 

Dredge: 

Corozal. dry docked in locks. 265. 281. 297, 317. 

Couplings, pipeline. 89, 261. 

Dipper, two 15-yard. 101, 247.273. 281, 309.349, 

378. 379. 385. 425. 
Dipper, work comparison, 457. 
Mole, retirement and sale, 297. 
Passage through Gatun Lake. 1. 
Passed through locks, 65, 77. 133, 253. 
Positions on. 392. 
Pumps, record change, 233. 
Repairs. 253. 
Transfers, 205. 

Dredging: 

Atlantic entrance. 17. 

Culebra Cut. 17. 53. 65. 89, 105, 115. 121, 134. 
141, 153. 161. 181, 189. 205, 213. 254. 265. 373. 
Division, organization, 211, 306. 

See also Governor's reports, monthly, 45, 80, 

125. 165, 217. 257, 303, 342, 389. 449, 488. 

Drill barge destroyed by explosion. 475, 485. 486. 494. 

Drill boat sunk. 174, 259. 

Drownings, accidental. 54. 55. 78, 162, 261. 268, 363. 

387. 
Dry Docks: 

Balboa terminal, 26, 254-5, 376, 473. 
Cristobal, rates for use, 1 19. 

See also Governor's reports, monthly. 45. SO, 
125. 165, 217. 257. 303. 342, 389, 449, 438. 
Dumps. Balboa work transfer. 438. 454. 
Dynamite: 

Explosion, premature. 475, 485, 486, 494. 
Magazine explosions, 350, 460. 
Theft. 379. 401. 



Earth for sanitarj' fills. 401. 

Earthquakes, 53. 73, 91. 114, 144-9, 233, 277, 397. 

Easter services, 311. 

Electric: 

Current, rates. 295. 506. 

Generating equipment transferred to Miraflores, 
189. • 

Power plants, 337, 425. 

Street railway. Panama, 41. 92, 184, 457, 474. 

Substations. 100, 190, 213. 362, 375. 473. 

Transmission: 

Overhead lines. 33. 174. 268. 309, 375. 439, 

473. 
Underground duct, 100. 153, 192. 245, 318, 
337. 376. 385, 401, 425. 
Electrical and Mechanical Engineer, acting. 392. 
Electrical material for duct line, 401. 
Electrical Division: 

Accountable officer, 334. 

Office, temporarj', 338. 

Organization, 306, 355, 367. 

See also Governor's reports, monthly. 45. 80. 
125, 165, 217. 257. 303, 342, 389, 449, 488, 
Electrocutions, accidental, 261. 387. 398. 
Elliott. Rev. CarlH., 143. 
Elysisus James Education Committee. 79. 118, 175, 

354. 505. 
Emergency dam, 36, 141, 494. 
Emery. Walter, resignation, 135. 
Emigration, monthly reports, 50, 85, 106, 154, :00, 259, 

292. 318, 364, 412, 477. 513. 
Employment conditions, permanent force, 228, 233, 

235, 345, 346. 355, 356, 381. 393. 
Engine failures, 480. 

Engine house, Pedro Miguel, dismantled. 33. 
Equipment: 

Available for -Maska, 105, 319. 

Disposition and preservation, 9, 39, 63, 95, 103, 
231. 

Floating, appraisal, 403. 

Ipterchargeablt use, 385. 

Interference with use. 344. 

Purchase. 382. 

Retired, sale, 105. 

Retirement, 470. 

Sales, value. 106, 216. 451. 

Sales, rules governing, 6, 392, 438. 

Stock reduction. 367. 

Survey requests, 6, 103, 223, 381. 

Transfer and marking, 356. 

Transfer requests, 288. 356. 

Turned into stores, 344. 
Erection Division: 

Abolished, 470. 

Accountable officer, 334, 470. 

Organization, 3G6. 



Erection Division: 

See also Governor's reports, monthly, 45, 80, 
125, 165, 217, 257. 303, 342, 389, 449. 488. 
Estates: 

Administrator, appointment notice. 520, 526, 528. 
Administrator's sale, 359. 370. 
Escheat notice. 508, 519. 528. 
List, weekly. 326. 339. 358, 362. 382, 386, 398, 
410, 426, 434. 446, 458. 466. 474. 487. 494, 510. 
522. 
Excavation: 

Central Division, totals. 49. 

Cost statements, Part 2, Nos. 19, 36. 

Culebra Cut: 

Dredging, 17, 53, 65, 89. 105. 115, 121, 134. 

141, 153. 161, 181. 189, 205. 213. 254, 265, 

373. 

Hydraulic, 77, 1 15. 213. 222. 254, 26o. 321, 509. 

Steamshovel, I, 17, 25.1 21. 157, 207. 289. 409. 

Records, monthly, 19. 26, o7. 78. 108, 115. 154, 

206, 246. 282, 325. 385. 433. 485. 
Records, monthly since American occupation. 28, 
68. 116, 156, 208. 248. 2S4, 329. 388, 436. 48o. 
See also Governor's reports, monthly, 45, SO, 
125. 165, 217. 257, 303, 342. 389. 449, 488. 
Excuse cards, 334, 358, 392. 479. 
Executive Department, organization. 365. 
Executive Office: 

Accountable officer. 334. 
Bureau heads, 358. 
Chief Clerk, appointment, 323. 
Organization, 306-6, 315. 365. 
Executive Orders: 

Admeasurement Board, 487. 

Bail bonds, 30. 

Bills, payment by steamship companies. 350. 

Birds, protection, 5. 

Board of Health, 523. 

Bribery. 229. 

Canal: 

Act effective. 213. 
Commissioner, appointment, 5. 
Opening committee, 399. 
Operation and navigation, 497-504. 
Organization, permanent, 213, 233. 235, 285. 
Civil Service rules, amendment, 526. 
Constables, duties, 523. 
Courts. 305, 475. 

Criminal procedure, amendment, 30. 
Culebra Cut, navigation prohibited, 73. 
Deported persons, 67. 
Drafts, 526. 

Employment conditions, permanent force, 22S. 
Fines, remission, 399. 
Firearms, carrying, 123. 
Hunting, 236. 

Injury compensation, 300-3. 
Interest rate. 123. 
Isthmian Canal Commission: 

Acts and resolutions approved, 285-0, 386. 
Commissioner, appointment, 5. 
Special commissioner, compensation. 229. 
Johnson, Professor Emory R.. compensation, 229. 
Judiciary. 305, 475. 

Land commission, payment of members, 386. 
Leave regulations, 228. 265. 
Naval reservations. 412, 523. 

Navigation and operation of Canal, 497-504. 517. 
Organization, Canal, permanent, 213, 333, 235. 

28. >. 
Pardons, remission of fines, 399. 
Pilot service, 350, 497-504, 517. 
Registrar of property. 475. 
Quarantine, maritime, regulations. 57-9. 
Radio stations, naval, 412, 523. 
Tipping prohibited, 229. 
Tolls, bills for material, etc., payment. 350. 
Washington office, organization, 28o. 
Wireless apparatus on steamships, 487. 
Wireless stations, naval. 412, 523. 
Expenditures: 

Accounts, classified, 7. 150,. 

Approval. 393. 

Classified, monthly. 31, 56. 93, 101, 159. 209, 223. 

260. 364, 415. 478. 505. 512. 
Cost statements. Part 2, Nos. 19. 36. 
Personal, reimbursement, 202, 380, 480. 
Vouchers, approval, 393. 
Explosives, amount used by Central Division, 49. 
Explosions: 

Dynamite. Cucaracha slide. 475, 485, 486, 494. 
Powder magazines, 350. 460. 
Exposition: 

Panama, 42. 99, 181, 509. 
Panama-Pacific, 91, 504. 



Farm, hospital, Corozal. 245, 333. 
Falkner. Dr. Roland P., resignation, 158. 



Fender chain and machines. 266. 375, 425. 
Fifth Division: 

Abolished, 211. 221. 
Accountable officer. 131, 139. 159. 
Head, acting, 87. 
Filtration plants, 106. 260, 265. 
Fines, remission, 399. 
Fire: 

Alarm, procedure. 266. 
Drill, volunteer companies, 369. 
Equipment, buildings, 95. 
Protection, 169, 209. 269. 

Protection Division, See Police and Fire Division 
Stations, monthly inspection, 415. 
Whistle, 429. 
Firearms, permit to carry, 123. 175. 
Fires. 78, 182. 216, 325. 
First aid packages, 17. 
First Division offices consolidated, 293. 
Fisher, Lieut. C. W., transfer, 458. 
Flagmen, instructions, 442. 
Floating equipment, appraisal, 403. 
Force reports: 

Issuance, 454. 

Monthly. 10. 48, 90, 122. 168. 214, 259, 290, 338. 
413, 438. 
Foremen, force reduction, 131. 
Forging press, Balboa shops, 192. 
Fortifications: 

Accountable officer, 334, 454. 
Assistant Engineer, appointment, 439. 
Organization. 306. 
Reservations, 75. 393. 
Visitors, 75. 
Foundry, Balboa shops, 19. 
Fortney, C. P.. resignation, 158. 
Fourth Division: 

Accountable officer. 179. 
Personn I changes, 179. 
Work assigned. 211. 
Fourth of July celebration, 399. 415. 427, 437. 448. 459. 
Fram. Polar ship, visit. 106, 157. 
Freight on express shipments, 334. 
French: 

Administration buildin;. history and sale. 249. 
Cruiser Montcalm, visit, 350. 
Property inventory. 6. 
Fruit growing, Subsistence Department, 93, 213, 234. 

321. 
Furlough pending reemployment, 393. 
Furniture inspection board, 242, 267. 



G 



Gaillard. Lieut. -Col. D. D.: 

Obituary. 142, 157. 

Retention as commissioner, 54. 
Gamboa dike, removal. 1-2, 14, 25, 41. 53, 65-6. 
Gamboa stockade, prisoners' entertainment, 27. 
Garbage, cans and collection. 428. 
Garrison, Edgar, S., resignation, 261. 
Gasoline, sale by commissaries, 371, 
Gatun Lake: 

Depopulation of area, 22, 174, 299. 

Dikes, Cano saddle, 103. 112, 133, 173. 364. 

Dock charges, 263, 433. 

Elevation, 225. 256. 

Filling, 373. 

Hydroelectric station. 17, 190, 352-4, 442. 

Levee, 16. 

Rise, 113. 

Run-off, dry season, 461. 

Seismograph station removed, 253. 

Sightseeing trips, 27, 236, 274, 379, 394. 

Spillway, 41. 164. 173, 225. 256. 

Stages, See each issue. 

Water for Colon and Cristobal, 141. 

Water stage registers. 54. 385. 
Gatun River bascule bridge, 122. 
German cruiser Nuernberg, visit, 412. 
Goethals, Colonel Geo. W., appointment, 225, 233. 
Goethals, Lieut. Geo. R., detail. 446. 
Gold claims investigated. 129. 
Goldmark, Henry, resignation, 339. 
Gorgas, Colonel William C: 

Nomination for Surgeon-General, 207. 

Trip to South Africa, 56, 67, 164. 
Gorgona, social history. 35. 
Governor of The Panama Canal: 

Nomination and appointment. 225. 233. 

Reports, monthly. 45, SO, 125, 165. 217, 303, 342, 
389, 449, 488. 
Grade crossing protection, 474. 
Grader, hydraulic, 321, 509. 
Gravel : 

Consumption, comparison, 496. 

Loading record, 25. 

Measurements, standard, 344. 394, 430. 

Plant, Chagres River, 141, 173. 179. 293. 



Gravel: 

Sale. 505. 
Greene. Colonel Henry A., relieved. 291. 
Greenslade. Geo. A., resignation. 426. 
Gudger, Hezekiah A., resignation, 446. 

H 

Hamburg-American Line: 
Office building, new. 410. 
Rates, 380. 415. 
Sailings suspended, 493. 
Hand cars, rules governing use. 242, 344. 
Health Board, 523. 
Health Department: 

Accountable officer. 33A. 

Board of Health, 523. 

Chief Health Officer, appointment, 281. 

Chief Quarantine Officer, appointment, 289. 

Organization, 233, 235. 305. 517. 

See also Governor's reports, monthly. 45, 80. 
125, 165. 217. 257. 303, 342. 389. 449, 488. 
Hebard. R. W.. and Company: 
Chiriqui railroad. 234. 414. 
Exposition building contract. 181. 
Highways: 

Erapire-Gamboa, 266. 
Oiling. 268. 
Hodges, Col. Harry F.. appointment, 281, 289. 
Hoffman, Major George M.. transfer. 49. 
Holidays. 87, HI, 159. 242. 295, 382. 
Holmes. W. J., resignation, 434. 
Homicide case. 412. 
Hospital: 

Ancon — 

Building sites, change, 364. 
Rebuilding, committee. 327. 
Smoking in wards prohibited, 216. 
Superintendent, appointment, 293. 
Tivoli dispens r>- consolidated. 33S. 
Choice privilege discontinued, 103. 
Colon — 

Accommodations reduced, 111, 240. 
Organization, new. 162. 
Cristobal, proposed. 349. 
Eyeglass account, 201. 
Farm. Corozal, 245. 333. 
Patients, chronic, disposition. 103. 
Private. 473. 
Santo Tomas, 333. 392. 

Treatment, rules governing, 124, 366, 394, 416. 
Visitors, hours, 139. 
Hotel: 

Accounting. 368. 

Aspinwall. Taboga Island, 91, 184. 205. 211. 263, 

348, 423. 
Cigar stands, 338. 

Commission, Ancon and Pedro Miguel. ;<, 9. 
Coupon books, 211, 366, 454. 
Report, fiscal year. 98. 
Tivoli, improvements, 2, 133. 
Tivoli annex, bachelor quarters, 277. 
Washington, interior decorations, 317. 
Hours of work, 179, 356. 
Household goods, moving and shipment, 1. 5, 51. 231. 

256. 475. 
Houston, J. Frank, pardoned, 37. 
Hull inspectors, appointment, 344. 526. 
Hunting in Canal Zone, 171, 236. 346. 
Hydrants, water, award. 155. 

Hydroelectric station, Gatun Lake, 17, 190, 352-4, 375, 
442. 

See also Governor's reports, monthly, 45, 80, 125, 
165, 217, 257, 303, 342. 389. 449, 488. 
Hygiene lectures, 510. 

I 
Ice delivery and sale, 7, 396, 443, 519. 
Identification certificates. 490. 
Immigration reports, monthly, 50. 85. 1C6. 154, 200, 

259. 292, 318, 364. 412, 477. 513. 
Inca Society, annual dimner. 310, 350. 
Income tax law, 241-2. 
Increase of force papers. 369, 417. 
Independent Order of Odd Fellows, election, 142, 177. 
Index. Canal Record, 25. 
Infant feeding. 447. 
Inflammable liquids, 346. 
Injunction suit, 201. 
Injury compensation, 300-3, 393. 
Insane, hospital treatment, 366, 394, 416. 
Insect trap, 239. 
Insurance, mail matter, 249. 
Interest rate. 123. 

Interment and cremation of bodies. 187, 295, 345. 
International Insurance Company, withdrawal, 338, 

359,372, 383. 
Invalids, deportation, 346. 
Isthmian Canal Commission: 

Acts and resolutions approved, 285, 386. 

Commissioner, appointed, 5. 

Gaillard, Lieut.-Col. D. D., retained. 54. 



INDEX 

Isthmian Canal Commission: 

Special commissioner, compensation, 229. 



Jervey, Major James P., transfer, 49. 

Johnson, Professor Emory R., compensation. 229. 

Joint Land Commission. See Land Commission. 

Jordan, Thomas H., resignation, 184. 

Juan Mina Island, assignment, 254. 

Judiciary, See Courts. 

Judson, Lieut.-Col. W. V.. transfer, 315. 

Jury list, 506. 

K 

Kerr, J. L.. watch inspection contract. 474. 
Kitchens, laborers', report, 98. 
Knights of Columbus, election, 91 
Koemer, Chas. F., resignation, 158. 



La Boca, townsite. 155, 209. 

Labor force, monthly, 10, 48. 90, 122, 168. 214, 259. 

290, 338, 413. 438. 504. 
Labor trains. 31, 63, 62, 238. 271, 278, 290, 307. 317. 

482, 513. 
Laborers : 

Employment and promotion. 159. 
Hours of work, 179. 
Name and check number. 480. 
Transfer, 103. 
Lacroisade, Dr. Jean Pierre, obituary, 234. 
Land Commission: 

Appointments. 385. 522. 
Awards. 4. 11, 19. 34, 59. 69. 
Claims, time limitation. 552. 
Compensation for members, 386. 
Disagreements, 107, 130. 
Opinions, 94. 107, 130. 
Hearings, 44, 39S. 412, 467. 
Meetings resumed. 385. 
Resolution, 461. 

Rules dismissing claims. 4, 72. 83. 94. 107, 461 , 467. 
Settlements, 164, 478. 
Tour of inspection, 433. 
Land Department, Panama railroad report, 176. 
Larvacide, sale, 184, 428. 
Launches: 

Gasoline, new, 92. 157, 265. 

Transferred to Transportation Department. 445. 
Laundry consolidation, 460. 
Leave. See Circulars. 
Lee, Ernest T:., resignation. 474. 
Lenten services, 247. 
Leper asylum. Palo Seco: 
Christmas box, 175. 
Christmas box, 175. 

Removal of inhabitants in vicinity, 378. 
Visiting days, 292. 
Lepers, hospital treatment, 334, 366, 394, 416. 
LePrince, Joseph A., resignation. 298. 
Leprosy, 334. 

Letters, misdirected. See each issue. 
Levee, Gatun spillway, 164. 
Level rods, unserviceable, 231. 
Levelman, examination. 18, 164, 310, 466. 
Lewis, Fitz J., resignation, 466. 
Leyland Line, rates, 380. 
License for sale of merchandise, 401. 
Licenses: 

Cancellation, 114. 
Rules and regulations. 403-8. 
Notice to applicants, 446. 
Lidgerwood cars, disposal, 95. 
Life boats for lock approaches, 445. 
Life saving medal awarded, 412. 
Lighthouse: 

Construction resume, 375. 
Electric transmission line, 77. 
Manzanilfo Point, removal, 78. 
Lighthouse Division: 

Accountable officer, 33i, 490. 
Organization. 306. 
Transfer. 425. 

See oho Governor's reports, monthly, 45, SO, 125, 
165, 217, 257. 303, 342, 389, 449, 488. 
Lightning strikes r*inge tower, 445. 
Limbs, artificial, 124, 345. 
Limestone, soil treatment. 213, 234, 321. 
Linemen, tools, purchase, 273. 
Local Inspectors: 

Appointments, 111, 223, 344, 526. 
Examination notices, 27. 48, 67, 91, 108, 131, ISO, 
171, 187, ^12, 231. 252. 271, 288, 308. 323. 348, 
370. 396, 421. 442. 462, 491, 506, 527. 
Rules and regulations, 403-S. 
Locks : 

Accountable officer, 470, 490, 506. 

Cable pulling record, 1. 

Caisson dams, 136-8, 201, 376. 509. 



Locks: 

Construction, 374. 

Concrete, See Concrete. 

Cost statements. Part 2, Nos. 19, 36. 

Emergency dam, 36, 141. 374. 494. 

Fender chains and machines. 266. 374. 425. 

Filling, water required. 114. 

Gates, completion. 36, 97. 157, 216. 

Gatun : 

Cable installation, 41. 

Cableway, removal, 222. 

Concrete mbcing plant, closed, 5. 

Control board, operation, 361, 373. 

Dike, removal, 7, 17. 

Dredge dry docked. 265, 281. 297, 317. 

Dredging fleet, passage. 53. 65. 77. 

Illumination, 274. 

Operations. 41, 410. 

Submarines dry docked, 256, 273, 297, 317. 

Track connection, center wall, .removed, 33. 

Valves, test, 190. 

Work, transfer, 75. 
Guard. Tenth Infantry, 337. 465. 
Machinery, operating, 36. 
Miraflores: 

Backfilling. 121. 

Chamber cranes, dismantling. 13. 

Current. 309. 

Emergency dams, 141. 

Construction bridges, removal. 150. 
Operation, first, 65. 

Water density, 309. 
Operations. 41, 65, 133, 374, 409. 
Permits to visit, 394. 
Summary' of work, 36. 108, 374. 
Superintendents, appointment, 370, 430. 
Towing locomotives. 213, 265, 317, 374. 
Valves, test, 190. 

See also Governor's reports, monthly, 45. 80, 
125, 165, 217, 257, 303, 342, 389. 449, 488. 
Locomotive: 

Charges, invoicing, 223. 
Engineers, force reduction, 282. 
Equipment, additions, 173. 
Failures, 480. 

Retirement and sale, 113. 
Lost articles, 216. 

Lottery tickets, sale forbidden, 346. 
Lubricants, standard, 14, 103, 111. 439-42. 
Lumber received, record month, 35. 



M 

MacDonald, Donald F., resignation. 143. 
Machines, shop, numbers, 43. 
Magazines, powder, explosions, 350, 460. 
Mail, handling. Panama railroad, 242. 
Mail service. United Fruit Company, 98. 
Maps, p^eser^'atio^, 167. 
Market public, Panama, 397. 
Marine Corps: 

Departure for Vera Cruz. 205. 317. 

Railroad instruction, 161. 
Mariners' notices, 131,417, 430, 479. 490, 526. 

See also Sailing directions, 523-6. 
Marshal. District, appointment, 289. 
Masonic Temple, Colon, transfer. 56. 
Masons, visit, 190. 
Material. See Equipment. 
McCann, \V. R., resignation. 494. 
McClintic-Marshall Construction Company's 

claims, investigation, 476. 

Local office closed, 293. 
Mears, Lieut. Frederick, detail, 398. 
Mechanical Division: 

Accountable officer, 278, 288, 307, 334. 

Duties, 382. 

Organization, 306. 

Personnel changes. 111. 

Shops transferred, 250, 273. 

Superintendent, appointment, 227, 231. 

See also Governor's reports, monthly. 45. 80, 
125, 165, 217. 257, 303. 342, 389, 449, 488. 
Medals. Canal. 92, 330-3. 
Medical storekeeper, accountable officer, 358. 
Medical treatment requests, 95. 
Memorandum receipts, 307. 
Memorial Day exercises, 387. 
Mess: 

Accounting. 368. 

Ancon, 9. 

Report, fiscal year. 98. 
Metal checks. 40S, 454, 462, 479. 
Metal Trades Council, 303, 434. 
Metcalfe. Richard Lee, 5. 298. 
Military reservations. 75, 393, 412. 
Miraflores Lake: 

Elevation, 253, 410. 

Excavation, 374. 

Filling. 374. 

Location and outline, 55. 



8 



INDEX 



Miraflores Lake: 

Mosquito breeding, 349. 

Run-oflF, dr>' season, 461. 

Spillway. 18. 25, 121. 260. 281. 

Water loss, 173. 

Water stage registers. 54. 

Water works, 29. 89, 174, 389. 
Mitchell, John P., visit. 118. 
Moneys received, disposition. 381. 
Morgan, John T.. memorial tablet, 77. 108. 
Mosquito breeding. Miraflores Lake, 349. 
Mosquito trap, 239. 

Motor boat, navigators' examination. 403-8. 
Motorcycle licenses issued. 214. 
Motor busses, 510. 

Motsett, Charles H., appointment. 417, 426. 
Moving pictures, official. Canal work, 201. 
Municipal Engineering Department: 

Accountable officer. 334. 

Chemist, 394. 

Organization, 306. 394. 

Superintendent, acting, 39, 430. 

See also Governor's reports, monthly, 45. 80, 
125, 165, 217. 257, 303, 342, 389, 449, 488. 
Munitions, Panama, sale, 154, 227. 
Murderer apprehended, 387. 

N 

Naos Island breakwater, 49, 113. 
National Grain Dealers Association, visit, 91. 
National Navigation Company, rates, 380. 
National Surety Company, withdrawal, 2ol. 
Naval reservations. 412, 523. 

Navigation aids, 131, 375, 417, 430. 479. 490. 526. 
Navigation and operation of Canal, 497-504. 
See also Canal sailing directions, 523-6. 
Nepotism, 346. 

New Gorgona, townsite, 22, 174. 299. 
New Orleans, bubonic plague, 446. 
New Zealand, cruiser, visit, 1. 
Ninas, Geo. A., resignation, 298. 
Nixon, Capt. Courtland, resignation, 175. 
Noble, Maj. Robert E., trip to South Africa, 67, 104. 
Notaries public, 39, 266, 416. 
Nutting. D. C, Jr., appointment, 227, 231. 

o 

Obiiuary: 

Arango, Ricardo M., 221. 

Archer, Fred A.. 387. 

Arthur, George Edward, 222. 

Baty. Gordon, 458. 

Bernsee, Mrs. F. L., 79. 

Brendle. Warren E., 175. 

Brodeur, Napoleon. 99. 

Buker, Theodore A., 298. 

Cameron, Frank F., 291. 

Canfield, Dr. Herman, 339. 

Cody, Mrs. Catherine, 291. 

Crafts. Charles W., 311. 

Cleveland, George F.. 398. 

Dahl. Victors., 415. 

Deemer, Willard, 261. 

DeLong, Irvin, N.. 311. 

Dodds. Charles W., 486. 

Ellsworth, Chas. M., 363. 

Eramett, William P.. 30. 

French, Mrs. Margaret V., 363. 

French, Marvin. 261. 

Gaillard, Lieut. -Col. D. D., 142, 157. 

Gartell, Frank D.. 3. 

Gray, Harry, 321. ^ 

Grover, Charles C, 234. 

Hall. Mrs. Emma, 261. 

Halloran. Edward P., 175. 

Hand. ElKvoodS., 468. 

Harrell, John H., 468. 

Haynie. Mrs. Gladys B., 486. 

Haywood, Harry K., 99. 

Hern, J. F.. Mrs.. 55. 

Heverly. Ernest W., 157. 

Hibben^ James H.. 30. 

Hill. George F.. 135. 

Hobson, Clarence O.. 428. 

Isgren, Carl J., 363. 

Jackson. Samuel. 55. 

Johnson. Mrs. J. C. 175. 

Johnson, William R., 475. 

Jones. Joseph W., 486. 

Kett. David. 486. 

Lacroisade. Dr. Jean Pierre, 234. 

Lagan, .Arthur, 162. 

Lenzen. Marj' Jane, 73. 

Logan, Orren, 114. 

Lokerson. Mrs. Albert C, 157. 

Markham, Albert V., 468. 

Marks, David. 475. 

Martin, George L., 78. 

McPhadden. Herbert C, 387. 

McPherson, Mrs. Clinton, 222. 

Miller, Albert Joseph. 142. 

Miller. Jay P., 387. 



Obituary: 

Murphy. John J.. 475. 
Nessler, Ernest M.. 261. 

Noonan, Edward. 387. 

O'Shaughnessy, Philip, 30. 

Pollard, Etta, 22o. 

Reynolds. William T.. 55. 

Roake, James H.. 496. 

Rottger. Charles E.. 496. 

Sackett, Charles, 486. 

Sheehy. Dennis D.. 311. 

Sherman. Mrs. M. A.. 270. 

Shettel. Jacob R., 446. 

Simpson, William, 207. 

Smith, Hugh G., 475. 

Smith, James F., 486. 

Spanner, Helen, 327. 

Stanton, John F.. 54. 

Stepp. Mrs. Jennie. 291. 

Stor^'. Enio. 268. 

Stuert. Stephen B.. 523. 

Telfer. William. 123. 

Turner. James M., 283. 

Warren, John Crittenden, 496. 

Whalen. Clarence E.. 234. 

Wellman. Glenni V.. 175. 

White. Marquis. 283. 

Wilkins, John M., Jr.. 114. 

Wilson, James. 496. 

Zook, Elhanan. 226. 
Observation platform, Culebra Cut, 138, 181. 
Oil: 

Berth for vessels. 213. 473. 

Houses, transfer, 14. 

Kerosene, contract, 494. 

Mexican for Union Oil Company. 181. 

Pipeline broken by fire. 216. 

Supply for shops. 201. 

Standard, list, 14. 103. HI, 439-42. 

Storage rent, private dealers, 25. 

Tank steamers for Union Oil Company. 181. 

Tanks, fire protection. 362. 
Oiling streets and roads. 268. 
Ornithological history* of Isthmus, 219. 
Operation and Maintenance Department: 

Organization. 233. 235. 289, 305, 455. 

See also Governor's reports, monthly. 45, SO, 
125. 165, 217. 257. 303, 342, 389, 449, 488. 
Opium, importation and use, 469. 
Ordinance, licensing chauff^eurs. 266. 
Oxygen gas. charges, 31. 
Oysters, native, warning. 266. 



Pacific Mail Steamship Company: 

Rates, 380. 

Sale of the Acapulco. 410. 
Palo Seco leper asylum: 

Christmas box, 175. 

Removal of inhabitants in vicinity. 378. 

Visiting days, 292. 
Panama: 

Calidonia bridge, footwalk, 433. 

Charges and credits. 368. 

Chiriqui railroad. 234, 414. 

Electric street railway. 41, 92, 184,457, 474. 

Exposition, 42, 99, 181, 509. 

Fill of marshy area. 9. 

Fire precautions. 43. 

Infant mortality, 447. 

Market, sanitar>' conditions, 397. 

Munitions, sale. 154, 227. 

Patients, hospital treatment. 366, 394, 416. 

Policeman, found dead, 461. 

Powder magazine explosion, 350. 

Railroad station, old and new, 9. 44. 1 19, 340, 

Sanitation, 401. 428. 

Street cleaning, 9. 

Street impfovements, 162, 229. 238. 266. 349. 

Swamp reclamation, 433. 

Tenth Infantr\' patrol, 106. 

Water supply. 28. S9. 174. 3S9. 
Panama Agencies Company, 135. 
Panama- Pacific Exposition. 91. 504. 
Panama railroad : 

Accountable officers, 334. 421. 439. 518. 

Agent, local, acting. 470, 506. 

Auditor, local, appointment. 39, 51. 

Baggage, 153, 240. 312, 421. 

Barge, sightseeing. 189. 206. 226. 236. 254. 310. 

Bridge: 

Bascule. Gatun river. 122. 
Calidonia. widening footwalk, 433. 
Pontoon, crossing Canal. 17. 121. 14!. 190, 
213. 245, 280. 349. 362. 379. 

Bulletins. 87. 95. 103. 139, 150, 159, 171. 179, 187, 
203. 211. 231, 242. 263. 271. 278, 288, 295, 223. 
383, 442. 

Cara, passenger service, 286. 

Coal transportation, 124. 



Panama Railroad: 

Commissar>'. See Commissary'. 
Culvert, Curundu River. 129. 269, 325. 
Demurrage system and rates. 213. 242. 
Embankments, 97. 494. 
Engine failures, 480. 
Firemen, bids for runs, 285. 
Flagmen, instructions, 442. 

Freight: 

Agency, local. 7, 335. 
Shipments, delay, 103. 
Traffic, fiscal year. 176. 

Transfer. 521. 
Gatun valley embankment. 97, 494. 
Gold Hill line. 86. 
Grade crossing protection. 474. 
Gravel plant. 141, 173. 176. 179, 293. 
Hand cars, rules. 242. 344. 
Hotel operations, fiscal year. 176. 
Income, fiscal year. 176. 

Interlocking signal service. 122, 177, 325. 386. 450, 
457. 

See also Bulletins. 
Labor trains, 31, 62, 63, 238, 271. 278, 290, 307. 

317,482,513. 
Land Department, report, fiscal year, 176. 
Lighthouse, Colon, removal. 78. 
Locomotive equipment, additions, 173. 
•Lost articles. 216. 

Mail handling on baggage cars. 242. 
Master of transportation, office organization, 260. 
News agency. 469, 494, 
Office hours, 227. 
Parlor car ser\'ice, 7. 
Passenger traffic, fiscal year. 176. 
Passes, card. 179. 
Paymaster, appointment, 491. 
Port captains, appointment, 7, 14. 
Property inventory. 307. 
Relocation, 377. 
Report, fiscal year, 176. 
Restaurant, 164. 
Receiving and forwarding agent, appointment, 

131. 
Right-of-way, encroachments. 119. 
Rolling stock, inventor^'. 168. 
Seawall. Cristobal, construction, 115. 
Sightseeing service. 27, 93, 138, 171. 181. 189. 206, 

226, 236, 254, 274. 310, 394. 
Signal service: 

Bulletins. 87, 95. 103, 139. 150. 159, 187. 203, 
211. 242. 271, 278, 288, 295, 307, 383, 442. 

Interlocking plant, 122, 177, 325, 386, 450, 
457. 
Special trains, 63, 87, 334. 
Stations : 

Balboa. 268, 445. 

Corozal. remodeled. 133. 

Darien, 415. 

Miraflores. 254. 273. 415. 

Panama, 9, 44, 119, 340. 

Paraiso, site, 273. 
Steamship; 

Advance converted for freight, 318, 410. 

Baggage. 312. 

Cristobal taken from service, 526. 

Lockages, 410. 

Tickets, mailing, 18. 

Ticket agent, acting, 470, 507. 

Tourist traffic, 97. 

Rates, 344. 380. ^ 

Report, fiscal year, 176. 

Reservations, 379. 
Storage rates, 213. 

Superintendent, appointment, 75, 139, 344, 417. 
Telegraph office. Cairaito. closed. 307. 
Telephone and signal departments, consolidation, 

31. 
Telephones, 278, 315. 455. 
Ties, use and life, report. 85. 
Timetables. 1. 3, 7. 22. 39. 42, 43. 62. 131. 183, 

250, 433. 435. 455. 493, 495. 513. 
Tracks through Central Division dumps, 205. 
Trainmaster, appointment, 14. 179. 
Transportation forms. 171. 430. 442, 
Transportation and traffic conditions, 313. 
Transportation Department, organization. 211. 
Treasurer, local, acting, 315. 
Velocipedes, operation. 242. 
Washout, 522. 

Watch inspection contract. 474. 
Watchman service. 266. 
Wharves. See Wharves. 
Wreck and coroner's verdict, 109, 114, 142. 
Yardmaster, appointment, 179. 
Yards, i^, 184, 226, 292. 

Sec also Governor's reports, monthly, 45, 80, 
125, 165, 217, 257, 303. 342, 389, 449, 488. 
Paraiso spring water discontinued, 253. 
Parcel post packages, 334, 490. 
Pardons, 37. 399. 



INDEX 



Parlor car service. Panama railroad, 7. 
Patients, chronic, 103. 
Pavins brick contract, 493. 

Pay: 

Car schedule. 102. 139.343. 
Receipts, unclaimed. 139. 
Rolls, approval. 393. 
Paymaster, duties, 365. 
Pedro Miguel: 

Buildings, changes, 5, 106. 
Fill, 106. 

Municipal work, 325. . 

Penitentiary-: 

Conditions, investigation, 99. 

Entertainments, prisoners', 27. 

Prisoners discharged given money and clothing, 

201. 
Prisoners, escape. 182. 
Rules governing prisoners, 203. 
Perry, Surgeon James C, resignation, 310. 
Peruvian war vessel passed through Canal, 521. 
Phillips, Col. John L., resignation, 298. 
Photographs. 345. 
Physical examination, 346, 356. 
Pierce, Surgeon Claude C, resignation. 143. 
Piers. See Wharves. 
Pile? rafted through Canal, 297. 317. 
Pilot hoat. Pacific entrance, 337. 
Pilouge : 

Amount collected, monthly, 466. 
Regulations, 350, 517. 
Pilots: 

Applications and examination. 242, 250, 349,403-8. 
Appointments, 401, 475. 
Uniforms, 362. 
Pilson, F. K., pardoned, 37. 
Pinball, game. 222. 
Pistol shoot, Police Division, 427. 
Pittier, Henry, visit, 291. 
Plague: 

Case reported on S. S. Aysen, 321. 
Precautions. 269, 361, 397, 446. 
Plants for townsites, 200. 
Plastering, portable staging, 290. 
Playgrounds, permanent, 35, 312. 
Plows, retirement, 470. 
Plumbing work, 357. 
Polar ship Frcm. 106, 157. 

Police and Fire Div.sion, organization, 315, 365. 
Police and Prisons: 

Assistant Chief, appointment, 150. 
Chief, acting, 171. 
Stations, 171, 179. 

See also Governor's reports, monthly, 45, 80, 
125, 165, 217, 257. 303, 342. 389. 449, 488. 
Pontoon bridge, crossing Canal, 17, 121, 141, 190. 213, 

245. 289, 349, 379. 
Port Captains: 

Appointments. 7, 14, 281, 369. 
Duties, 416. 
Offices established, 349. 
Postage due stamps. 269. 
Postal insurance and c. o. d. service, 249. 
Postal savings, monthly statements. 12, 130, 170. 192, 

240. 274. 322. 363. 410, 504. 
Posts, Division: 

Abolished. 438. 
Inspector, acting, 31. 
Offices, 295. 336, 361. 
Organization, 315, 365. 

See also Governor's reports, monthly, 45. 80, 
125. 165, 217, 257. 303, 342, 389, 449, 488. 
Powder magazine explosions. 350, 460. 
Precipitation, monthly, 23. 63, HI, 150, 188. 210, 252. 

279. 3IS. 370. 422. 462. 
Price, William J., appointment, 56, 74. 
Prisoners. See Penitentiary. 
Private business during working hours, 150. 
Profanit>', 346. 
Promotions, 345, 356. 
Property : 

Accountable officers. 87. 131, 139. 159, 231, 278. 
288, 295, 307, 315. 334. 348, 358. 421, 430, 439, 
454. 462, 470. 490, 506. 
Accounting, 181, 187, 263, 307. 368, 514. 
Foremen's orders, 482. 
French, inventor>'. 6. 
Memorandum receipts, 307. 
Nonexpendable, 223. 307. 514-7. 
Panama railroad, inventoo*. 307. 
Registrar, 475. 
Releases, 179, 462, 479. 
Returns, receiving and auditing, 179. 
Rights, private, 393. 
Transfer requests, 288 
Pumping equipment, awards. 97. 
Pumping stations, 11. 134, 2o5. 
Purchasing Agent, appointment. 51. 150. 
Purchasing Department: 

General Purchasing Officer, appointment,. 289. 



Purchasing Department : 
Organization, 235. 305. 

Q 

Quarantine: 

Bubonic plague precautions. 269, 361, 397. 446. 
Officer, appointed, 298. 
Regulations, 57-9, 418-21. 
Station. Cristobal. 343. 429, 485. 
Quarry: 

Ancon, crusher statements, 10, 19, 34, 51, 78, 
104, 107, 114. 142. 162. 177, 184. 195, 229, 240, 
249. 256. 268, 274. 286. 31S. 362. 386. 
Porto Bello closed. 378. 
Sosa Hill, operation suspended, 289. 
Work transfer, 211. 
Quartermaster's Department: 
Accountable officers. 334. 
Chief Quartermaster. Assistant, appointment. 39. 

289. 
Depot Quartermaster, appointment, 51. 150. 
District Quartermasters, transfer. 15. 187. 
Purchasing Agent, appointment. 51, 150. 
Quarters: 

Abandonment, west side Canal. 281. 

Applications, list. 369. 

Assignments, Empire and Culebra, 225. 

Assignments, permanent force, 228. 

Building by employes, 465. 

Dismantling, Empire and Culebra, 225. 

List of applicants, monthly. 31. 95. 120. 159. 204. 

252, 2S6. 336. 3S3, 442. 490. 
Permanent. 33. 253, 309, 429, 512. 
Release, 202. 462. 479. 

Renting, silver employes. 187, 225. 345. 438. 
Reports, monthly. 10, 48, 90. 122, 168. 214. 259. 

290. 338. 413. 438. 504. 
Retentionduring leave, 202. 369. 
Rules governing, 369. 



Radio stations: See Wireless. 
Rail bending device. 328. 
Rail joint, portable tracks, 185. 
Rainfall: 

Dry season. 411. 

Heavy, record. 521. 

Records, monthly, 23. 51, 63, 102, 138. 188. 231. 

270. 313,358. 454, 462. 507. 
Records, weekly. See each issue. 
Tables, monthly, three years, 23, 63, 111. 150. 188. 

210, 252. 278. 315, 370, 422, 462. 518. 
Year 1913. chart. 262. 

5fea/5o Weather reports. 23, 63. Ill, 150, 188. 
210. 252, 278, 315, 370, 422. 462, 518. 
Ratings, duties to conform. 356. 
Ratings and rates of pay. 103, 111. 139. 159, 179.311, 

250, 323. 357-8. 370, 402-3. 
Records, preser^'ation. 334. 
Recreation hall, Balboa, 105. 
Red Cross: 
Ball, 14. 

Christmas seals. 142. 
Election of officers, 227. 
Financial statements. 48. 119. 159. 216. 260, 268. 

318, 363, 412, 479. 
Lectures, 427. 477. 
Reemployment applications. 356, 381. 
Registrar of property. 475. 
Relatives, employment. 346. 
Report, annual, material, 430. 
Rerdell, M. C. resignation, 143. 
Reser\'ations established. 33. 75, 393, 412, 523. 
Responsibihties of employes, 365. 
Restaurant, Panama railroad, 164. 
Rewards for murderers, 135. 
Rice straw, contract, 493. 
Rio Grande dike. 1. 9, 205. 317. 

Rock crusher. Ancon quarr>-. weekly statement. 10. 19. 
34, 51, 78, 104. 107, 114. 142. 162. 177. 184, 195, 229. 
240. 249, 256. 268, 274. 2S6, 318, 362. 386. 
Rock specimens for Smithsonian Institution, 153. 
Rock storage pile, 162,318. 
Rolling stock: 

Accountability, 87. 
Inventor^', 168. 
Transfer and marking. 356. 
Roundhouse, locomotive, Balboa. 189. 
Rowe, Dr. L. S.. resignation, 35. 
Royal Mail Steam Packet Company, rates, 380. 



Sailing directions. Canal, 523-6. 
Sailor, U. S. N., stabbed, 21. 
Salvation Army, 118, 267, 511. 
Sand: 

Consumption, comparison. 496. 

Measurements, standard. 344. 394. 430. 

Miraflores service transferred. 438. 



Sand: 

Service discontinued and resumed, 256, 277, 337. 
Sanitarium. Taboga Island. See Hotel Aspinwall. 91, 

184, 205, 2\lt 263, 348, 423. 
Sanitary Department, Chief Cfficer, acting, 75. 
San Juan, health conditions, 5, 21. 
Santo Tomas hospital. 333. 392. 
Sault Ste. Marie Canal, lockages. 461. 
Schiavoni, M. J., resignation. 158. 
Schildhauer, EMward, resignation, 466. 

School: 

Athletic league and meet, 327. 429. 

Attendance, 89. 191. 328. 

Commencement exercises, 437, 447. 

Consolidation, 261. 

Culebra. white, change, 227. 

Fire driU. 101. 

High, principal, appointment. 118. 

Holidays, 111. 139. 

Hours, change, 103. 

Las Cascadas, changes, 175. 

Opening, 27. 54. 191. 

Organization. 315. 365. 

Paper, The Zonian, 427. 

Play, 411, 427. 

Reception, 283. 291. 

Report, annual, 477. 

Superintendent, appointment. 87. 

Teachers' meetings. 37, 191. 

See also Governor's reports, monthly, 45 80 
125, 165. 217. 257. 303. 342. 389. 449, 488! 
Scrap: 

Brass and copper, handling, 87. 
Credits allowed, 179. 
Recoveo'. 231, 355. 
Sales. 11. 391. 504. 
Seamen, American, hospital treatment, 366, 416. 
Second Division: 

Accountable officers. 131, 139. 
Organization increase. 293. 
Work assigned. 211. 
Seawall construction, Cristobal. 115. 
Seismic disturbance, 53. 73, 91, 114, 144.9 233 277 
397. ' - . . 

Seismograph station, Gatun Lake, removed. 253 

Seniority, 345, 393. 

Ser\'ice records. 271, 393. 490. 

Sessions, Arthur, resignation, SO. 

Shipments: 

Employes. 51. 231. 334. 470. 

Instructions and loss claims. 439. 

Sample. 6. 

Shops : 

Balboa: 

Designation, 6. 

Erection, 92, 376. 

Fire protection. 162. 

Forging press, 192. 

Foundry. 19. 

General foreman, acting, 455. 

Layout. 254-6. 

Machines, numbering, 43, 

Office building, 282, 397. 473. 

Time clocks, 505. 

Paraiso : 

Air compressors, 337. 
Reopened. 97. 

Transfer. 250, 273. 

Expense, percentage, 6. 103, 

Floating, rates for use, 179. 

Forging press. 192. , 

Gatun, closed. 297. 

Oil supply. 201. 

Permanent, designation, 6. 

Shipways. designation. 6. 

See also Governor's reports, monthly, 45. 80. 
125, 165, 217. 257. 303. 342. 389, 449, 488. 
Steamshovels. standard, 51, 392. 
Shriners, visit, 2, 13. 
Sibert, Lieut.-Col. Wm. L.: 

Appointment. China service. 426. 

Resignation, 283, 291, 298. 
Sightseeing barge. 189. 206. 
Sightseeing ser\ice. 27, 93, 138, 171, 226, 236, 254, 

274. 310. 379, 394. 
Sixth Division: 

Accountable officer, 131, 139. 

Consolidation, 105. 

Designated Dredging Division. 211. 
Slides, Culebra Cut: 

Dredging, 53, 65-6. 89, 105. 115, 121. 134. 141, 
153, 161. 181. 189, 205, 254, 265. 373. 

Sluicing. 77. 115. 213,222, 254, 265, 321, 509. 

West bank opposite Las Cascadas. 385. 
SmUlpox case, 114. 

Smithsonian Institution, rock specimens. 153. 
Spearhead found, 458. 



10 

Spillways : 

Concrete. See Concrete. 

Cost statements. Part 2. Nos. 19, 36. 

Construction. 375. 

Gatun Lake. 41. 164, 173. 225. 

Miraflores Lake. 18. 25, 121. 260, 281. 

See also Governor's report, monthly. 45, 80. 
125, 165. 217, 257, 303, 342, 389, 449, 488. 
Spreaders, retirement, 470. 
Stationery forms, standardization, 307, 367. 
Steamship : 

Alterations to prevent accidents in Canal. 382. 

Canal service, 409. 

Inspection, rules ?nd regulations, 403-8, 490. 

Measurement. 193-200, 475. 

Passed through Canal. 493. 510. 521. 

Rates, 87, 180, 228, 263, 327. 344, 362, 380, 415, 
458. 

Sailings. See each issue. 

Tonnage certificates, 199, 416. 

Tourist, 109. 226. 

Transportation, employes, 228, 344. 

Wireless apparatus. 487. 
Stea msliovel : 

Culebra Cut. operations, 1-2, 17, 25. 121, 157, 201, 
289, 409. 

Engineers and cranemen, extra, 139. 

Rail joint for portable track. 185. 

Records. See Excavation. 

Sample for Brooklyn Navy Yard, 245. 
Steel, structural, contract, 433. 
Stone, standard measurements, 344, 394, 430. 
Storage rates. Panama railroad, 213. 
Storehouse; 

Accountable officer, 231, 295. 

Mount Hope, removal of section, 493. 
Strangers Club, 158, 434. 
Street cleaning. Panama, 9 
Street improvements, 162, 229, 238, 266, 349. 
Submarine flotilla: 

Arrival, 157, 

Do' docked in locks. 256, 273. 297, 317. 

Storage batteries renewed, 190. 
Subsistence Department : 

Accountable officer, 295. 

Fruit growing. 93, 213, 234. 321. 

Hotels, and messes report. 98. 

Subsistence Officer, appointment, 250, 288. 

See also Governor's reports, monthly 45 80 
125,165,217,257,303,342,389,449,488 ' ' 
Subsistence, emplojes on floating equipment 490 
Suez Canal traffic, 293, 461. 
Suicide. 78. 
Supplies: 

Receipt, weekly. See each issue. 

Received, value, 341, 451. 
Supply Department: 

Accountable officer, 334. 

Chief Quartermaster, appointment, 289 

Inspector, special, appointment, 421 

Organization, 233, 235, 305. 335. 

See also Governor's reports, monthly, 45, 80 125 
165, 217, 257, 303, 342, 389, 449, 488. 
Supreme Court; 

Decisions, volume. 321. 

Dissolved, 445. 
Surcharge: 

Labor, 6. 

Material, sales, 250, 438. 
Survey and Appraisal, board, 31, 119. 
Survey requests, 6, 103, 223, 381. 
Surveying Officer, appointment and duties. 344, 392, 

Swamp reclamation, 190, 256, 273, 433. 
Swim through Canal, 123. 
Swimming in Canal, 150. 



Taboga Island, convalescents, 247. 

See also Hotel .Aspinwall,' 91,'l84, 205 211 263 
348, 423. • ^^• 

Tehuantepec route, vessels diverted, 337. 
Telephone; 

Duct lines, 100. 153, 192, 245, 318, 337, 385. 401, 

Installation, 315, 455. 



INDEX 

Telephone: 

Repairs, 278. 
Telephone and Signal Department, consolidation, 31. 
Teller, William, will for probate, 335, 347. 
Temperature, monthly. 23, 63, HI, 150, 188. 210, 252, 

279, 315, 370, 422, 462. 
Ten years of Canal work, resume, 373-8. 
Tennis tournaments. 191. 207, 216, 247, 267. 283, 291, 

363, 427. 
Tenth Infantr>': 

Greene, Col. Henry A., relieved, 291. 

Guarding locks. 337, 465. 

Panama patrol, 106. 

Strength increase. 105. 
Terminal Construction Division: 

Accountable Officer, 334, 430, 462. 

Office Dock 13 vacated, 445, 

Organization, 306. 
Termination of service papers, 51, 242, US, 442, 462, 

479. 
Thanksgiving, President's proclamation, 101. 
Tide tables. See each issue. 
Ties, railroad, 85, 150. 
Tile blocks, maunfacture. 117. 
Timber, Chilibre River, 77. 
Time books, 223, 454, 491. 
Time clocks, shops, 505. 
Time vouchers, 75, 526. 
Timekeeper. Chief, mail address, 470. 
Timekeeping: 

Consolidation, 211. 462. 

Inspector, appointment, 63. 
Time tables, Panama railroad, 1, 3, 7, 22, 39, 42, 43, 

62,131,183,250,433.435,455,493,495, 
Tipping proliibited, 229. 
Tivoli Club, annual meeting, 2, 13. 
Tivoli hotel, improvements, 2, 133. 
Tolls: 

Amount collected, monthly. 466. 

Exemption, repeal, 470. 

Payment regulations, 350. 
Tonnage certificates. 416. 
Tools, linemen and wiremen, purchase, 273. 
Tours of the Canal, 3. 
Towage, payment regulations, 350. 
Towboat. gasoline, award, 92, 265. 
Towboat, sale. 33. 

Towing locomotives, locks, 213. 265, 317, 375. 
Townsite : 

Balboa, plan, 153, 276-7. 

La Boca, 155, 209. 
Tracings, mailing. 31. 
Trackspan bridges, climbing, 430. 
Track shifters, retirement. 470. 
Trails, clearing proposals, 314. 
Tramways. Panama. 41. 92, 184, 457, 474. 
Transfer slips, 15, 111, 506. 
Transfers, 345, 356, 470. 

Transformer substations, 100, 190, 213, 362, 473. 
Transmission line, electric, 33, 174, 268, 309, 439, 473. 

See also Governor's reports, monthly, 45, 80! 125 
165, 217, 257. 303, 342. 3.S9, 449. 488. 
Transportation: 

Conditions, permanent force, 228. 

Forms. Panama railroad, 171. 430, 442. 

Labor gangs. 231. 
Transportation Division, organization. 306. 
Trap, animal and mosquito, 124, 239. 
Traveling engineer, duties, 381. 
Traveling expenses, 480. 
Treasury committee, visit, 282. 
Trees for permanent townsite. 200, 413. 
Tug Reliance, voyage around South America, 225. 
Tug service, Balboa, 385. 
Tugboats, steel, 325, 378, 451. 
Typhoid fever from native oysters, 266. 

U 

Union Oil Company; 

Fuel oil from Mexico, 181. 

Tank steamers, new, 181. 
United Fruit Company; 

Building, new, 113. 

Mail service, 98. 

Sailings, change, 268. 

Steamship rates. 87, 180, 263, 327, 362, 380, 458 
University Club, 79. 
Unloader records, 34, 78. 



Vacation. See Leave. 

Vaccination. 428. 

Vacuum cleaning machines, 189. 

Velasquez River, squatters, removal, 4S8. 

Vera Cruz: 

Health Department employes transferred, 387. 

Marine Corps transferred, 205, 317. 
Vessels. See Steamships. 
Vouchers, expenditure, approval, 393. 

w 

Wage scales. 103, 111, 139, 159, 179, 211, 250, 323 

357-8, 370, 402-3. 
Wagg. Frank P., resignation, 79. 
Warren. H. P. resignation, 123. 
Warship, Peruvian, first through Canal, 521. 
Washington office, organization, 285, 305. 
Washout. Panama railroad. 522. 
Waste, cotton, standard. 439-42. 
Watch inspection contract. 474. 
Watchman service, Panama railroad, 266. 
Water: 

Exposition grounds, 425. 

Filtration plants, 106, 260, 265. 

Gatun Lake for Colon and Cristobal. 141, 377. 

Hydrants, award. 155. 

Main. Colon, extension, 1. 

Miraflores Lake for Pacific end, 29, 89, 174, 377 
389, 426. 

Pipe, cast iron, 174, 476. 

Pumping equipment, award, 97. 

Pumping stations. 11. 134, 265. 

Registers, 54, 355. 

Rules and regulations, 14, 355. 

Service, transfer, 438. 
Watersheds, depopuk tion, 17. 
Weather observe tor>, 485. 
Weather reports, monthly, 23, 63, 111, 150, 188, 210, 

252, 279, 315, 370, 422, 4o2, 518. 
Weidman, Charles E., resignation, 426, 
Whaling ship, visit. 485. 
Wharves: 

Balboa terminals. 154, 254-6, 290, 376, 493. 

Cargo handling, 337. 

Coal, temporary, Cristobal, 457. 

Construction, resume, 376. 

Cristobal terminal, 98, 189, 164, 254. 293, 376. 457 
495. 

Design and construction rules. Ill, 417. 

Fire protection, 162, 209. 

Lighting, Cristobal, 164. 

Paving brick contract, 493. 

Steel, structural, contract, 433, 495. 

See also Governor's reports, monthly, 45, 80. 
125. 165, 217, 257, 303, 342, 389, 449, 488. 
Wildman. Major L. D., detail, 442. 
Wills for probate, 336, 347. 
Wireless ; 

Apparatus on steamships, 487. 

Commercial service, 37. 

News service, 509. 

Reservations, 369, 412, 523. 

Shipping notices. 509. 

Stations, erection, 97, 285, 377, 409, 412, 478, 

See 0/50 Governor's reports, monthly, 45, 80, 
125, 165, 217, 257, 303, 342, 389, 449, 488. 
Wiremen, tools, purchase, 273. 
Winn. C. B., acquitted of assault charge, 291. 
Women, employment, 356. 
\^'ood found below sealevel, 253. 
Work, private, by employes, 202, 211, 344. 
Work requests, 87, 95, 355, 370, 381, 416, 506. 
Wreck, Panama railroad, 109, 114, 142. 
Wrecking crane, charges, 278. 
Wrecking equipment, assignments, 326. 



Young Men's Christian Association Clubhouses: 
Balboa, 105. 
Colored, Culebra, 35. 
Culebra, anniversary and closing, 387. 
See also each issue. 



ZiNN, A. S., resignation, 215. 
Zook, Elhanan, obituary, 226. 



Animal trap, 124. 
Balboa: 

Terminal layout. 255. 

Townsite, 276. 
Caisson, lock entrance, 136-7. 
Chiriqui railroad route, 234. 
Commissary, Ancon, 155. 
Concrete mixing plant, portable, 320. 
Culvert, railroad. Curundi River 269 
Dike, Gamboa. 66. 
Earthquake area. 144, 147. 



ILLUSTRATIONS, DRAWINGS, MAPS, DIAGRAMS, ETC. 



Filtration plant. Miraflores, 29. 

Garbage ciin, seUclosing, 428. 

Hydroelectric station, Gatun. 352-4 

Insect trap, 239. 

Lake. Miraflores, 55. 

Lock entrdnce caisson, 136-7. 

Los Santos Province, 147. 

Panama, Isthmus, 144. 

Pinball. game. 222. 

Rail bending device, 328. 

Rail joint, 185. 



Railroad : 

Chiriqui, 234. 

Culvert, CurundQ River, 269. 

Station, Panama, 340. 

Rainfall. 262. 

Red Cross seal. 142. 

Steamship measurement. 193-5. 

Terminals, Balboa, layout, 255. 

Townsite. Balboa. 276. 

Traps, animal and mosquito. 124, 239. 



CANAL 




RECORD 



Volume VII. 



ANCON, CANAL ZONE, WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 27, 1913. 



No. 1. 



The Canal Record 

Published weekly under the authority and supervision of 
the Isthmian Canal Commission. 



The Canal Record is published free of charge, one copy 
each to all employes of the Commission and Panama 
Railroad Company whose names are on the gold roll. 
Extra copies and back numbers can be obtained from the 
new stands of the Panama Railroad Company for five 
cents each. 



Address all Communications, 

THE C-\NAL RECORD, 

Ancon, Canal Zone, 

Isthmus of Panama. 

No communication, either for publication or requesting 
information will receive attention unless signed with the 
*ull name and address of the writer. 

NOTES OF PROGRESS. 

Dredge "No. 82" Passes Through Gatun Lake. 

Suction dredge No. 82 left its mooring at 
the edge of the lake, near the landing for 
small boats at Gatun at 6.20 o'clock, Tuesday 
morning, August 26, and was towed by the 
steam launch Balboa to a point in the Canal 
channel north of the Gamboa dike, where it 
will be set at work within the next few days 
removing mud and gravel brought down and 
deposited there by the Chagres River. The 
dredge has been tied up at Gatun for several 
months waiting for the lake to rise to a height 
so that it could pass through it and begin the 
work of dredging. The 24-mile trip was made 
without incident, the dredge arriving at its 
destination at 3.20 p. m. It is the first large 
vessel that has passed through the lake 

channel. 

♦ 

Moving Employes' Effects in Panama and Colon. 

A ruling has been adopted by the Quarter- 
master's Department to the effect that when 
an employe moves from Ancon or Cristobal 
to private quarters in the cities of Panama and 
Colon, team ser\-ice may be provided, but 
where an employe moves from one house to 
another in those cities, the request for team 
service will be denied. The employe may, 
however, have the service on wTittcn agree- 
ment to pay the cost. 



Water at .South End of Miraflores Locks. 

The waters of the Rio Grande diversion 
were turned into the Canal prism between 
Miraflores Locks and the dike across the 
Canal, 5,000 feet south of the locks proper, 
on the afternoon of August 23, in preparation 
for the removal of the dike, which will open 
a channel from the locks to the Pacific The 
diversion was dammed at a point almost 
opposite the dike, at mile post 42.50, by 
means of a light fill of rock and earth, and 
the water was turned into the prism through 
a shallow trench. The prism is filling rather 
slowly, and it is probable that the Rio Grande 
supply will be augmented by letting in water 



from the sea.. The tripod drills on the side 
of the dike toward the locks continue at work 
and it is proposed to shatter the dike by sub- 
merged blasts on September 1. The lower 
level of the locks is protected against flooding 
by the lower guard gates, which were closed 
on August 20, and by closing the Stoney gate 
valves at the lower ends of the culverts in the 
side and center walls. About 25,000 feet of 
railway track were removed from this section 
of the completed channel, in anticipation of 
its inundation. 



FLOODING CULEBRA CUT. 



New Record in Pulling Cable. 

The cable gang at Gatun Locks, under Mr. 
G. A. Balling, super\-isor ot electrical installa- 
tion, consisting of Foreman Williams, F. W. 
Hallin, P. R. Kiger, N. Owens, N. Gilbert, 
O. \V. Steeds, and silver helpers, established a 
new local record in cable pulling for an 8-hour 
day on Thursday, August 21, by pulling 
9,828 feet of 8-conductor, No. 10 lead-covered 
cable, and 12,300 feet of 5-conductor, No. 10 
lead-covered cable, a total of 22,128 feet. 
A total of 9,200 feet ot cable was pulled dur- 
ing the first three hours. It rained the entire 
day. and on this account, the conditions 
under which the work was carried on were 
unfavorable. The best local recoid foi any 
one month is held at Gatun Lock.=, when 113,- 

002 feet of cable were pulled. 

♦ 

New P. R. R. Time Table. 

A new passenger train time table will go 
into effect on the Panama railroad at 2.30 
a. m., on Tuesday, September 2. The new 
schedule provides for a through main line 
service from Colon to Panama, via the Gold 
Hill cut-off, three trains each way daily ex- 
cept Sunday, with changes in the arriving 
and leaving time. The train leaving Panama 
at 1.30 p. m. daily, except Sunday, has been 
withdrawn. Train service for the villages on 
the west bank of the Canal between Bas 
Obispo and Culebra, inclusive, is provided, 
with five trains each way daily except Sun- 
day, including a train out of Panama each 
week da\- at 9 p. m. For particulars re- 
garding the new changes, attention is in- 
vited to the regular tables which appear on 
Page 3 of this issue. 



Visit of New Zealand Cruiser. 

The New Zealand battle cruiser New 
Zealand, Captain Lionel Halsey, R. N., is 
scheduled to arrive in Panama Bay about 
August 29, for a stay of six days. The vessel 
is of 18,000 tons, and is at present on detached 
duty. A reception will be given the captain 
and officers of the cruiser by the British and 
American residents, at the Hotel Tivoli on 
Wednesday, September 3, at 9 p.m. 
♦ 

The existing 6-inch water main on E street, 
Colon, will be extended south for a distance 
of several hundred feet to supply water to a 
new private laundry and cold storage plant, 
and other demands in that part of the city, 
at an estimated cost of $1,100. 



Steamshovel Work in Cut Proiie*- to ': 
tember 15 — Water To be Admitted ()* 



>,e Sey- 
wber 5. 



All steamshovel operations in Cm 'i •-<. Cut 
proper will be disc jntinned on Fiidaj. Sep- 
tember 15. and between that date and Oc 'ber 
5, when water will be admitted, all cquipn ( nt 
and other material to be rorovered, iucludin^ 
over 36 miles of track, must be out ^ f the 9- 
mile channel between Gamboa dike and 
Pedro Miguel Locks. At the pn ^ent lime, 
about 30 shovels are at work in the Cut, 
all on bottom excavation, with the exception 
of two on each side of the canal on the high- 
er levels engaged in "lightening the load" as 
a preventive measure against future slides. 
The shovels formerly at work on Cucaracha 
slide have been withdrawn, and the mate- 
rial remaining in the slide will be removed by 
dredging. All the bottom material remain- 
ing after September 15 will be drilled and 
blasted, preparatory to its removal by 
dredges. All electric wires crossing the Canal 
from Tower R, north, have been taken down, 

On August 1st, 99S,900cubicyardsrernained 
to be removed from inside of the theoretical 
Canal prism. It is estimated that steam- 
shovel operations between that date and Sep- 
tember 15 will reduce that amount to approxi- 
mately 650,000 cubic yards, which will be 
taken out by dredges. This is exclusive of all 
slide e.xcavation, and does not include re- 
moval of any of the inclines. 

It is the intention to retain 10 of the 
best conditioned shovels in service, using 
them in the work of removing material from 
the east and west banks, near Culebra, to les- 
sen the danger from slides. About six of these 
machines will be employed on the east bank, 
and four on the west bank, probably until 
May, 1914, and an organization sufficient to 
man and look after the shovels is now under 
consideration. Two of the shovels picked 
out for this work were wrecked beyond the 
point where it would pay to repair them, in a 
slide on the east bank, opposite Culebra 
village, on Sunday night, August 17. Empire 
will very likely be retained as headquarters 
for steamshovel supplies, as long as rail com- 
munication across the Cut is maintained. 
When communication is interrupted, the plan 
is to establish a repair outfit and small 
storehouse in the vicinity of the "Cotton 
tree" dump engine house on the east bank, 
w-ith a similar outfit on the west bank. The 
removal of the Empire suspension bridge will 
probably not be undertaken until the first of 
next year. * 

Water will be admitted to Culebra Cut, 
under the above schedule, on Tuesday, Oc- 
tober 5, five days in advance of the date set for 
the destruction of Gamboa dike. The means 
employed will consist of four 26-inch pipes 
extending underneath the dike, now used 
in pumping the drainage water out of the 
Canal. The equipment in the pump station 
will be removed prior to October 5, and tke 



THE CANAL RECORD 



Vol. VII, No I. 



•omcrete building in whif h it is housed will 
t)e dynamited. It is estimated that it would 
take 17 days to fill the Canal to the level 
of the dilce by this method, and the water 
that will be admitted in the 5-day period is 
mainly intended to act as a cushion against 
the Gamboa dike, which will be dynamited on 
October 10. A battery of drills is now en- 
gaged in sinking holes in the dike to the 
depth of about 30 feet. The blast is not 
•xpected to be spectacular, as it will probably 
only loosen the material, and possibly cause 
a small opening through which water from 
the lake will find its way, gradually increa- 
»ing in size until a considerable stream flows 
into the Cut. 

Gamboa dike was built in 1908 to 
protect Culebra Cut from inundation from 
freshets in the Chagres River. During the 
flood of December, 1906, the river rose to 
81.6 feet at Gamboa but this was before the 
dike was built, and before the Bas Obispo 
section of Culebra Cut had been completed. 
During the flood of November, 1909, the 
water rose to a height of 72.6 feet, and came 
»o close to the top of the dike, which was then 
at 71 feet above sealevel, that sluice gates 
were opened to fill the Cut with wacer to the 
level of the river to avoid heavy washing in 
case a break occurred. Since that year, the 
safety of the dike has never been menaced by 
freshets. When Gatun Lake rose to over 50 
feet in the latter part of 1912, the dike was 
widened to an average of 50 feet by dumping 
clay on the side toward the Cut, and raised 
to an elevation of 78.2 feet above sealevel. 
When the water in Gatun Lake reached 59.1 
feet on August 23, it was still 19.1 feet below 
the highest part of the dike, although that 
section over which trains have been run, is 
much lower. 

The rise of the lake has backed up the 
water in the Camacho Diversion as far as Bas 
Obispo. The diversion parallels the Canal for 
several hundred yards from the point where it 
enters the Chagres River. A small amount 
of water has been seeping into the Cut 
through the barrier between the diversion 
and the Canal, and to avoid any possibility 
of its giving way, a row of piling, spaced on 
2-foot centers, is being driven along the 
levee. In addition, several trainloads of 
earth will be dumped on the west side of 
the embankment. 

A few days ago a hand made dike, designed 
to prevent the water, which drains from the 
Culebra dump into a lagoon near the Lirio 
mill, from passing into the Canal, broke 
through, and gave rise to several rumors. 
No damage was caused, and the break was 
speedily repaired. 

♦ - 

Improvements at Hotel Tivoli. 

Several desirable changes are to be made at 
the Hotel Tivoli, including the extension of 
the driveway and entrance, an addition to the 
number of bathrooms, an increase in laundry 
facilities, and the remodeling of the kitchen. 
The circle in front of the hotel will be extended 
to take in the bandstand, and the driveway 
will pass behind this, about wheft the carriage 
stand is now. The porle cochere is to be length- 
ened to permit four carriages to enter under 
its cover at one time. The entrance stairway 
will be widened and given an easier slops 
outward. At the foot, the stairway will be 
divided to form two approaches to the ve- 
randa, which will be joined by a broad plat- 
form at the top. Under the new arrange- 



ment there will be sufficient space at the en- 
trance for two carriages to approach, and 
turn away again without interfering with each 
other. 

Eight bathrooms will be added in the two 
wings which were opened last year. Fancy 
tile floors will be laid in the barber shop, 
bathrooms, and toilets. 

The remodeling of the kitchen will make it 
one-third larger than at present. The ranges 
will be swung around to the wall that extends 
along the bakery, which will give more con- 
venient space for them, as well as the dish 
washing stands and bain Marie, a container for 
keeping the food hot. There will be three 
pantries, instead of two; the bakci'y prod- 
ucts will be served from one; cold meats, 
salads, and lunch dishes from the second; 
and tea, coffee, and other hot drinks from the 
third. The service tables will be increased 
in number, and be placed in parallel rows 
across the kitchen, with sutScient space be- 
tween each to permit the waiters to pass with- 
out crowding. 

Dining quarters for the women employes of 
the hotel are to be built in the basement. The 
cement flooring in this compaitmcnt is being 

laid. 

.^ 

Concrete Work in Locks and Spillways. 

.Concrete work in the Canal locks is nearly 
completed, the aggregate amount in place 
at the close of work on August 23, being 
4,477,796 cubic yards. 

A statement of the concrete laid in the 
three sets of locks for the Canal, and in 
Gatun and Miraflores spillways, as of August 
23, follows : 

Gatun Locks. 

The last concrete for the locks proper, as distinguished 
from that necessary to finishing work by the First 
Division, was mixed and placed on August 16. 1913. 
At the close of work on that day the total amount of 
concrete placed by the Atlanuic liivision amounted to 
2,045.485 cubic yards. 

PEDRO MIGUEL LOCK. 

Concrete laid. 
Cubic yards. 

Aug. 17 88 

Aug. 18 S3 

Aug. 19 38 

Aug. 20 , 27 

Aug. 21 22 

Aug. 22 41 

Aug. 23 42 

Total 311 

Previously reported 922,952 

Grand to;al 923,263 

MIRAFLORES LOCKS. 

Aug. 18 117 

Aug. 19 107 

Aug. 20 129 

Aug. 21 SO 

Aug. 22 106 

Aug. 23 96 

Total 635 

Previously reported 1,508,413 

Grand total 1,509,048 

GATUN SPILLWAY.* 

Aug. 18 93 

Aug. 19 118 

Aug. 20 136 

Aug. 21 120 

Aug. 22 56 

Aug. 23 100 

Total 628 

Previously reported 232,572 

Grand total 233,200 

MIRAFLORES SPILLWAY. 

Aug. 18 126 

Aug. 19 34 

Aug. 20 44 

Aug. 21 90 

Aug. 22 76 

Aug. 23 86 

Total 456 

Previously reported 74,990 

Grand total 75.446 

^Includes hydroelectric station. 



SOCIAL LIFE OF THE ZONE. 



Program for Visit of Shrlners. 

The United Fruit Company's steamship 
Ttirrialba is due to arrive on Thursday, Au- 
gust 28, bringing members of the Ancient 
Arabic Order, Nobles of the IVIystic Shrine, who 
are making a pilgrimage to the Isthmus under 
the auspices of Osman Temple of St. Paul, 
Minn., to view the Canal and to conduct the 
ceremony of initiation in one of the locks at 
Miraflores. The boat will dock at pier 16, 
Cristobal, and upon disembarking, the Shri- 
ners will form into a parade and march along 
Roosevelt avenue to Colon, thence up Front 
and Seventh streets to the Panama Govern- 
ment building, thence on Bolivar street to 
the Hotel Washington. The steamer Cartage, 
with the remainder of the party on board, is 
due to arrive at Colon on Saturday, August 
30. The Turrialha will bring Mr. J. Harry 
Lewis, the imperial potentate of the order, 
the Osman Temple band, and the patrol, to- 
gether with the paraphernalia incident to the 
initiation ceremony. 

The following program has been arranged: 

Thursday, August 28 — Embarkation and 
parade from steamer Turrialba to Hotel Wash- 
ington. Remainder of day to be devoted to 
individual sightseeing in Colon and Cristobal. 

Friday, August 29 — Sightseeing trip to 
Gafun Locks, dam, and spillway. Train 
leaves Hotel Washington at 8 a.m.; returning, 
leaves Gatun at 9.50. Round trip tickets, 70 
cents. The afternoon will be spent in Colon. 

Saturday, August 30 — Local and visiting 
Shriners will meet steamer Cartage at dock 
to welcome incoming members, and a special 
train will leave dock No. 16, on the arrival 
of the boat, for Panama. In the evening a 
reception and ball will be given in honor of the 
visiting Nobles, ladies, and invited guests at 
the Hotel Tivoli. 

Sunday, August 31 — A special sightseeing 
train will leave the Panama station, going 
over the Pacific and Central divisions of the ■ 
Canal, including Culebra Cut. Tickets $3. 
3 p. ni — Parade from Hotel Tivoli up Central 
avenue, Panama, and return. S.30 p. m — 
Band concert at the Tivoli by the Osman 
Temple band. 

Monday, September 1 {Labor Day) — Train 
leaves Tivoli spur, back of hotel at 6 a. m., 
for Miraflores Locks. Ceremonial at 7 a. m., 
sharp, followed by installation of bronze 
tablet in the locks. 2.30 p. m. — Special train 
will leave Panama station for Colon, going 
through without stop. P p. tn. — Traditional 
banquet at the Hotel Washington. Admis- 
sion by 1913 green card only. P p. m. — Re- 
ception to visiting and local Shrine ladies by 
ladies of the Eastern Star in the south wing 
of the Hotel Washington. 

Tuesday, September 2 — Visitors will depart 
for Bocas del Toro, where they will spend a 
few hours on their return trip. 

Prize Contest for Boys and Girls. 

The Cristobal Union Church announces a 
contest for boys and girls 15 years old, and 
under. For the best answer containing not 
less than 100 and not more than 150 words 
to the question, "What is your favorite book 
and why?" a suitable prize will be given. 
The essays must be in before September 1. 
Address "Prize Contest", Box 420, Cristobal, 
Canal Zone. 

The annual meeting of the Tivoli Club will 
be held at the Hotel Tivoli on Sunday morn- 
ing, August 31, at 10 o'clock. 



August 27, 1913. 



THE CANAL RECORID 



PANAMA RAILROAD COMPANY. 



PASSENGER TRAIN TIME TABLE No. I5-IN EFFECT SEPTEMBER 2, I9I3. 

PANAMA-COLON MAIN LINE SERVICE. 











SOUTHWARD 










Station. 








NORTHWARD. 








FIRST CLASS. 


FIRST CLASS. 


Satur- 
day 
only. 


Sunday only. 


Daily except Sunday. 


Daily. 


Dis- 
tance 

from 
Colon. 


Daily except Sunday. 


Sunday only. 


Mon- 
day 
only. 


71 


29 1 27 


25 , 23 , 21 


7 


5 


3 


I 


2 1 4 


6 


20 


22 


24 


26 


2> 


P.M. 
7.35 
7.40 


P.M. P.M. 

10.45 7.10 

slO.50 S7.15 


P.M. 
2.50 
S2.55 


A.M. 

10.50 

sl0,55 


A.M. 
6.45 
S6.50 


P.M. 
4.00 
S4.05 


A.M. 

10.40 

slO.45 


A.M. 

6.00 
S6.05 
S6.15 
S6.20 
S6.32 
S6.4S 
S6.56 
s7.06 
17.16 

s7.26 

s7.38 
7.43 
7.50 


A.M. 
3.00 
3.15 
3.20 
3.25 
3.30 
3.53 
4.05 
4.15 
4.35 

4.60 

5.00 
5.15 
5.25 


Lt. tColon Arr. 

JMount Hope.. . 1.57 

fMindi .. 4.40 


A.M. P.M. 
8.40 . 12.40 
S8.35 ,sl2.35 


P.M. 

6.50 

S6.45 


A.M. 
8.40 
S8.35 


P.M. 

12.45 

S12.40 


P.M. 
4.45 
S4.40 


P.M. 
8.15 
S8.10 


A.M. 

I.IS 
•1.10 


S7.50 
S7.S5 
S8.08 
S8.21 
8.30 
18.41 

sS.51 

S9.03 
S9.C8 
S9.16 
S9.18 


sii.66 

sll.05 
sU.18 
sll.31 

11.40 
fll.51 

A.M. 
S12.01 

S12.13 
12.18 
12.26 


S7.2."; 

s7.30 
S7.43 
s7.56 
S8.06 
18. IS 

S8.28 

s8.40 
8.45 
8.53 


s.i.6s 

S3.10 
s3 23 
S3.36 
s3.46 
f3.58 

S4.03 

34.20 
4.25 
4.33 


sll.05 

Sll.lO 
sll.23 
sll.36 
si 1.46 
fll.5S 
P.M. 
S12.08 

S12.20 
12.25 
12.33 


S7.66 
S7.05 
S7.18 
S7.31 
S7.41 
f7.S3 

S8.03 

sS.15 
8.20 
8.28 


S4.12 
S4.17 
S4.30 
S4.41 
S4.51 
15.01 

s5.ll 

S5.23 
S.28 
S.35 


slO.52 
S10.S7 
Sll.lO 
sll.21 
sll.31 
fll.41 

sll.51 
P.M. 

S12.0S 
12.10 
12.17 


.... New Gatun. . . 

. . . .fGatun 

. . . .fMonte Lirio. . . 

.... f Frijoles 

. . . .fCaimito 

f Tower "R" 

fNew Culebra... 

f Pedro Miguel Jc 

. . . . Miraflores 

fCorozal 

Diahln 


5.94 
6.79 
14.48 
20.92 
26.13 
30.85 

35.19 

40.23 
41.74 
44.24 
44.92 
47.08 


s8.26 

S8.22 
s8.08 
S7.56 
S7.46 
.7.34 

S7.26 

S7.15 
S7.10 
S7.03 


S12.26 
S12.22 
S12.08 
sll.56 
si 1.46 
fll.34 

sll.26 

SU.IS 
Sll.lO 
sll.03 


S6.36 
S6.32 
S6.18 
S6.06 
S5.56 
f5.44 

S5.36 

S5.23 
s5.1S 
s5.C8 


S8.26 

,s8.22 
S8.08 
S7.56 
S7.46 
f7.34 

s7.26 

S7.1S 
7.10 
7.03 


S12.31 
S12.27 
S12.13 
612.01 
sll.51 
fH.39 

sll.31 

sll.20 
11.15 
11.08 


S4.31 
S4.27 
S4, 13 
S4.01 
S3.51 
f3.39 

S3.31 

s3.20 
3.15 
3.08 


■8.01 

37.57 
17.43 
87.31 
37.21 
17.09 

•7.01 

S6.50 
6.45 
6.38 


• 1.01 
•13.57 
•12.43 
•12.31 
312.21 
fl2,09 

•12.01 

A.M. 

ell. 50 

11.45 

11.3* 


9 25 
P.M. 


i2.3S 

A.M. 


9.00 
P.M. 


4.40 
P.M. 


12.40 1 8.35 
P.M. 1 A.M. 


5.45 
P.M. 


12.25 

P.M. 


8.00 

A.M. 


5.40 ijArr. Panama. Lv. 

A.M. 


6.55 
A.M. 


10.55 5.00 
A.M. P.M. 


6.55 
A.M. 


11.00 

A.M. 


3.00 
P.M. 


6. 30 
P.M. 


11.30 
P.M. 


71 


29 


27 


25 


23 21 


7 


5 


3 


1 tTelegraph Station, s 
;Stop. f Flag Station. 




2 


4 


6 


20 


22 


24 


26 


n 















PANAMA-BAS OBISPO PASSENGER TRAIN TIME TABLE. 












SOUTHWARD. 


Station. 


NORTHWARD. 


SECOND CLASS. 


SECOND CLASS. 


Sat. 
only. 


Sunday only. 


Daily except Sunday. 


Daily except Sunday. 


Sunday only. 


iMon- 

lol5!;. 


73 


59 


57 


55 I 53 1 51 


49 1 47 1 45 1 43 1 41 


40 


42 1 44 


46 


48 


50 52 


54 


56 1 58 


72 


P.M. 
11.00 
11.05 


P.M. 
11.00 
11.05 
il.lO 
11.15 
11.28 
11.30 
11.35 
11.42 
11.44 
1 1 . .SO 
P.M. 


P. M. 
6.00 
6.05 
6.10 
6.15 
6.28 
6.30 
6.35 
6.42 
6.44 
6.50 

P. M. 


P. m.'a. m. 

2.3010.30 
2.35,10.35 


A. M. 
6.30 
6.35 
6.40 


P. M.lp. M. 
6.10 3.40 
6,15 3.45 
6.20 3,50 
6.25 3.55 
6.38 4.08 
6.40 4 10 
6.451 4.15 
6.52' 4.22 
6.54! 4.24 
7.00 4.30 

p. M. P. M. 
\ 


P. M.'a. M. 

1.30 10.30 
1.35 10.35 
1.4010.40 
1.45 10.45 


A.M. 
6.30 
6.35 
6 40 
6.45 
6.58 
7.00 
7.05 
7.12 
7.14 
7.20 

A.M. 


Leave. Bas Obispo Arrive. 


A.M. 
8.20 
8.16 
8.10 
8.05 
7.53 
7.50 
7.45 
7.38 
7.36 
7.30 

A. M. 


P.M. 
12.40 
12.36 


P.M. 
3.20 
3 16 


P.M. 
6.0o 
6.01 


P.M. 
9.50 
9.46 
9.40 
9.35 
9.22 
9.20 
9.15 
9.08 
9.06 
9.00 

P.M. 


A.M. A.M. 
I.IOJ 9.00 
1.06 8.56 
1.00 8.50 

12.55 8.45 


P.M. 
1.05 
1.01 
12.55 
12.50 
12.37 
12.35 
12.30 
12.23 
12.21 
12.15 
P.M. 


P. M. P. M. 
5.0510.50 
5.01 10.46 
4.55 10.40 
4.5010.35 


A.M. 
1.10 
1.06 


11.10 


2.40 
2.45 
2.58 
3.00 
3.05 
3.12 
3.14 
3.20 
P. M. 


10.40 


f Empire 


12.30 
12.25 
12.12 
12 00 
11.55 
11.48 
11.46 
11.40 
A.M. 


3.101 5.55 
3.05 5.50 


1.00 


11 IS 


10.45 6.45 
10.581 6.58 
U.OO! 7.00 
11.05: 7.05 
11.121 7.12 
11.14! 7.14 
11.20 7.20 
A. M. A. M. 


f Culebra 


12.55 


11.28 
11.30 
11.35 
11.42 
11.44 
11.50 
P. M. 


1.58 
2.00 
2.05 
2.12 
2.14 
2.20 
P.M. 


10.58 
11.00 
11.05 
11.12 
11.14 
11.20 
A.M. 


f Paraiso Jet. 

f Pedro Miguel Jet 

Miraflores 

fCorozal 

Diablo 

Arrive Panama. Leave. 


2.52 
2.50 
2.45 
2.38 
2.36 
2.30 
P.M. 


5.37 
5.35 
5.30 
5.23 
5.21 
5.15 
P.M. 


12.42 
12.40 
12.35 
12.28 
12.26 
12.20 
A.M. 


8.32 
8.30 
8.25 
8.18 
8.16 
8.10 
A.M. 


4.37 10.22112.42 
4.35 10.2012 40 
4.3010 IS 12.35 
4.2310.08 12.28 
4.2110.06 12.26 
4.15 10.00';i2.20 
P. M.|P. M.A.M. 


73 1 59 


57 


55 


53 51 


49 1 47 


45 


43 


41 


40 


42 44 


46 


48 


50 


52 


54 1 56 1 58 II 72 



COLON-CATUN SHUTTLE TRAIN SERVICE. 

SUPPLEMENT NO. I TO TIME TABLE NO. 15. 



Effective Tuesday, September 2, 1913, daily, except Sundays, shuttle trains will be operated between Colon and Gatun on following 
schedule, making stops as shown: 



SOUTHWARD. 


STATION. 


NORTHWARD. 


SECOND CLASS. 


SECOND CLASS. 


135 


133 131 129 127 


125 


123 


121 


120 


122 


124 


126 


128 130 


132 


IM 


P.M. 


P. M. P. M. 


P. M. : P. M. 


A.M. 


A. M. 


A. M. 


Leave. Arrive. 

Third Street. Colon 


A. M. 


A.M. 


A.M. 


P. M. 


P. M. P. M. 


P. M. 


P. M. 


5.50 


4.50 
4.52 
4,54 
4.56 
4.58 
5.02 
5.08 


2.50 
2.52 
2.54 
2.56 
2.58 
3.02 
3.08 


1.50 12.50 
1.52 12.52 
1.54 ' 12.54 
1.56 1 12.56 
1.58 12.58 
2.02 1 1.02 
2.08 ■ 1.08 
2.12 i 1.12 
2.15 1.15 


9.45 
9.47 
9.49 
9.51 
9.53 
9.57 


8.45 
8.47 
8.49 
8.51 
8.53 
8.57 


7.40. 
7.42 
7.44 
7.46 
7.48 
7.52 
7.58 
8.02 
8.05 


8.35 
8.33 
8.31 
8.29 
8.26 
8.22 
8.16 
8.13 
8.10 


9.40 
9.37 
9.35 
9.33 
9.31 
9.27 
9.21 
9.18 
9.15 


10.40 
10.37 
10.35 
10.33 
10.31 
10.27 
10.21 
10.18 
10.15 


1.45 
1.42 
1.40 
1.38 
1.36 
1.32 
1.26 
1.23 
1.20 


2.45 
2.42 
2.40 
2.38 
2.36 
2.32 


3.45 
3.42 
3,40 
3.38 
3.36 
3.32 


5.45 
5.42 
5.40 
5.38 
5.36 
5.32 
5.2« 
5.23 
5.20 


64S 


5.52 




6.4J 


5.54 




6.40 


5.56 




6.38 


5.58 




6.36 


6.02 




6.32 


6.08 


10,03 , 9.03 
10.07 1 9.07 
10.10 1 9.10 


Mindi 


2.26 3.26 


6.26 


6.12 


5.12 3.12 
5.15 3.15 




2.23 
2.20 


3.23 
3.20 


6. 23 


6.15 




6.20 










P.M. 


P. M. P. M. 1 P .M. : P. M. 


A.M. A.M. 


A. M. 


Arrive. Leave. 


\.U. 


A. ii. 


A.M. 


P.M. 


P.M. 


P. M. 


P. M. 


P. M. 


135 


133 131 1 129 1 127 


125 123 


121 


120 


122 


124 


126 


128 


130 


132 


1S4 



Fatal Accident. 

Frank D. Gartrell, a conductor in the em- 
ploy of the Fifth Division, was fatally in- 
jured early Friday morning, August 22, 
while riding on a flat car loaded with railroad 
cross-ties. At the time of the accident, he 
was endeavoring to prevent a violent coupling 
with other cars, also loaded with ties, by means 
of the hand brake. The cars came together 
with sufficient force to shift the loads, and he 
was caught between them, sustaining in- 



juries from which he died on the way to 
Ancon Hospital. He was 24 years of age, 
unmarried, and is survived by a sister, Mrs. 
V. H. Smith, living at Memphis, Tenn. 



National Grain Dealers' Association; Oc- 
tober 25, Mississippi Valley Medical As- 
sociation; November 8, National Laundry- 
men's Association; November 12, Nashville 
Board of Trade. 



Tours of the Canal. 

Mr. H. R. Gregory, president of the travel 
service bureau of St. Louis, announces that 
the following five parties will vi.'iit the Canal 
on the dates mentioned: October 18, Louis- 
ville Chamber of Commerce; October 18, 



Strangers Club activities during the month 
of September include an informal dance om 
the second and fourth Thursday!; special 
dinners each Sunday and Thursday, with 
music at the Thursday dinner. 



THE CANAL RECORD 



VoL VII, No, I. 



JOINT LAND COM MISSION. 



Additional Awards. 

The following additional awards were an- 
nounced by the Joint Land Commission at a 
public session held on Monday, August 18: 

Award No. 19 — In the matter of the claims of Fran- 
cisco V. de la Espriella. and Jose H. Stilson, to the 
Property designated as "Mnaflnres" — To Francisco V. 
dp la Espriella. for his interest in the lands of "Mira- 
flures" lorated within the Canal Zone, together with 
any impro\ements whi'.h may be claimed by the same, 
$17,500. To Jose H. Stilson, for his interest in the lands 
of "Miraflores" located within the Canal Zone, not 
heretofore acquired by the United States, together 
with any improvements, which may be claimed by the 
same. S7.500. Total. S25.000. 

Award No. 20 — In the matter of the claim of .Serafin 
Achurra. for improvements on lands of Talenquera, 
Obispo, and Gaynhoa — To Serafin Achurra, for the 
Bettlcment of all rights, claims, or other interests in all 
growing crops, fruit trees and buildings, and all other 
improvements of every kind, and all other rights and 
claims in lands designated as Talenquera, Obispo, and 
Gamboa on the property map of the Canal Zone, 
$1,190. 

Award No. Zl — In the matter of certain claims for 
houses in the town of Gorgona — In an opinion of the 
Joint Land Commission, dated July 25, 1913, on the 
demurrer of Counsel of the United Scates to the juris- 
diction of the Commission, in the matter of the claim 
of Juan Sotillo, the Commission reached the decision 
that it had jurisdiction to consider the claims of persons 
who were the owners of the houses in Gorgona, for 
whose value Oiey now ^laim, prior to the issue of leases 
fo: su. •' prn^^eriy by ..he Isthmian Canal Commission, 
or are the Iieirs of such persona, and to make awards 
against it-o Unitei States in favor of said claimants. 
The evirimce before ine Conmiission shows that the 
persons hereinafter named were either the owners of 
tlK- properties hereinafter referred to. before they ac- 
ccptrd any leases from the Isthmian Canal Commission, 
or are thf heir? of such persons. In no case did the 
persnn- ..'.tein.-Ucr named make any claim to the 
owuerslL, .it the land. 1 o the owners of buildings, for 
'.he srltl. 1 ..nt ot ail right?, claims, or other interests 
\.hich thrv may iiave in ii'.e same, together with any 
other iii:provK.ieni3 on the Jots with houses designated 
by th^ir to,:, numb -s. as follows: Antonio Andrade, 
tax No. 7J.'. St'i^""; tax No. T'^S, §6,500; total, $6,900; 
E. Cadet, ta^ . 749, ^i,7C"- tax No. 762. $630; tax 
No. 831, i4iu; loLal. $2,9''!; uliis award is subject to 
such equities, if any, as may be possessed by third 
parties, and it is ordered that the amount of this award 
be deposited in the Circuit Court of the Second Ju- 
dicial Circuit at Empire for distribution in accordance 
with the terms of this award;) W. H. Carrington, 
administrator of the estate of George Andrade, de- 
ceased, tax No. 747. £540; tax No. 751, $1,500; tax 
No. 752. Sl.SOO, total. $3,840; Lillian Cookhom. 
administratrix of the estate of Horatio Cookhorn, de- 
ceased, tax No. 842. $200; Ferdinand Fanfan, tax 
No. 829, $130; Pastora Gordon, tax No. 789, $85; 
tax No. 790, $80; total, $165; Charles Laurent, tax 
No. 784. $250; Modesta Leon, tax No. 803, $200; 
Guadaloupp Lopez, tax No. 815, $75; Alejandro Ramos, 
tax No. 755. $1,100 (This award is subject to such 
equities, if any, as may be possessed by third parties, 
and it is ordered that the amount of this award be de- 
posited in the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial 
Circuit at Empire for distribution in accordance with 
the terms of this award.) Grand total, $15,810. 

Award No. 22 — In the mniter of c.rlain claims for 
house:, in thf town oj Gurnuua — In an opinion of the 
Joint Land Comrai'isinn. dated July 25, 1913. on the 
demurrer of Counsel of the United States to the juris- 
diction of the Commission in tlie matter of Juan Sotillo, 
the Commission reached the conclusion that it had 
jurisdiction to consider the claims of persons who were 
the owners of the houses in Gorgona, for whose value 
they now claim, prior to the issue of leases for such 
property by the Isthmian Canal Commission; or are 
the heirs of such persons, and to make awards against 
the United States in favor of said claimants. The 
evidence before the Commission shows that the persons 
hereinafter named were either the owners of the proper" 
ties hereinafter referred to, before they accepted any 
leases from the Isthmian Canal Commission, or are 
the heirs of such persons. In the cases of the persons 
hereinafter named, claim was also made for the owner- 
ahip of the land. The evidence submitted to the Com- 
mission does not sustain this contention, and in making 
awards to the persons hereinafter named for their 
buildings in the town ol Gorgona. it is to be understood 
that the Commission dismisses, without award, the 
claims presented by them for ownership in the lands- 
To the owners of buildimis, for the setLlement of all 
rights, claims, or other interests, which they may have 
in th« same, together with any other improvements lo- 



cated on the lots with houses designated by their tax 
numbers, as follows: Joaquina U. de Lasso de la Vega, 
tax No. 744. $960; Benita Teran, tax No. 787, $1,050. 
Total, $2,000. 



said claims, the register number of the account, and the 
amount agreed upon is, as follows: 



NAME. 



Rin.E DISMISSING CLAIMS ALREADY SETTLED. 

In the matter of sundry claims on the lands oj Mata- 
chin — The Disbursing Officer of the Canal Zone has 
certified to the Commission that payments have been 
made in 1913 to the persons herein named, for their 
houses and other improvements on the lands of Mata- 
chin, covering claims which have been before the Com- 
mission for consideration. The record of these claims, 
showing name, together with the tax number of houses 
included in such claim, and the record of the Disbursing 
Ofificet showing the voucher number of each payment, 
its amount, and the month of the year 1913 in which 
the same was paid is, as follows: 



Anglin, Joseph 

Black, Joseph. . . . 
Brown, Emanuel.. 
Burnett, Samuel. . 
Campbell, Marion 



Collins, John(Johanna).. 
Grossman, Christopher. 
Constantine. Hypolite.. 

Daley, VVm 

Davidson. Joseph 

Davis, Aaron 



Dellpratt, Thomas.. . 
Diaz, Jose Maria. . . . 
Dougherty. Solomon. 

Douglas, Emily 

Duncan, Eliza 



House Mo. Vou. 
No. paid. No. 



Green, George 

Hawkins, Zachariah. 
Heath, Wilford Samuel, 

Henry, Daniel 

Henry, Samuel 

Hinds, Isaac and Rebec 



Hunter. Francis 
Hutchinson, James E- 

manuel , 

Jackson, Alexander. . . 
Jameson, Edgar Jere^ 

miah(Jamieson, Edgar 

J.). 



Kennedy, James 

King. Benjamin 

Lansicut, Augusta. ... 

Lewin. Jolin 

Louis, Areas 

Lynch, Martha 

Mariette, Benjamin. . . 
McCarthy, John 



McKenzie, Thomas . . . 

McPherson, Frederick. 

Mills, John B 

Monte, Josepha 

Mullen, Mary 



Muschette, Phillis. 
Pennant, Maria. . . . 
Robinson, Mary. . . 
Rowe, James 



Samuels, Jacob. . 
Smitli. Marion. . 
Stokes, Edward . 

Torres, Jose 

Tull, Conrad. . . . 



Valentine, Eliza. . 
VVaUer, Albert E. 



Watson, David 

Williams, Alexander. 
V\ illianis. David. . . . 
Wilmot. Philiti 



546 

103 

58, 

584 

502 

533 

557 

97 

65 

631 

63 

1,722 
573 
574 
550 

1,688 
563 

1,759 
454 

1,704 

1,715 

575 

632 

59 

582 

86 
52 

633 
69 



1,686 

72 

36 

74 

62 

1,556 

1,712 

1,553 

1,711 

1,716 

156 

157 

552 

1,562 

1,755 

466 

467 

469 

2,041 

1.761 

462 

87 

104 

1,745 

10 

577 

1,752 

44 

l,5S2 

629 

S3 

55 

1,719 

576 

84 

603 

635 



June 
July 
July 
July 



July 
July 
July 
June 
July 
June 

June 
July 
July 
July 
June 

July 
June 
June 
July 
June 
June 

July 
June 

July 
July 



July 
July 
July 
July 
June 
July 
June 
July 

July 

July 
July 
June 
June 



July 
July 
July 
June 

June 
July 
June 
July 
July 

July 
June 

July 
July 
June 
July 

July 



25,072 
25,837 
25,595 
25,834 



25,847 
25,843 
25,416 
25,357 
25,605 
25,296 

25,348 
25,849 
25,607 
25,418 
25.295 

25,594 
25,281 
25,349 
25,842 
2.S,292 
25,359 

25,598 
25,351 

25,608 
25.417 



25,599 
25,590 
25,604 
23,606 
25.069 
25,591 
25,286 
25,593 

25,845 

25,848 
25,596 
25,360 
25,356 



25,846 
25,361 
25,600 
25,353 

25,290 
25,839 
25,354 
25,835 
25,602 

25.592 
25,362 

25,603 
25,836 
24,968 
25,589 

25,844 



Am't 



S50 
80 
65 
65 



ISO 
300 
150 
125 
65 
180 

125 
60 
100 
150 
SO 

150 
60 

75 

lis 

SO 
45 

100 

55 

85 
60 



110 
100 
110 
100 
125 

65 
110 

70 

275 

lis 

40 
250 
110 



275 

135 

50 

so 

425 
80 
45 
65 

125 

100 
SO 

ISO 
125 
50 
170 

175 



In view of the payments noted, the foregoing claims 
call for no further action by this Commission, and they 
are accordingly dismissed. 

(Signed) Federico Boyd, Roland P. Falkner, 
Samuel Lewis, L. S. Rowe, Commissioners, 

RULE DISMISSING CLAIMS 

Jn the matter of sundry <laims on tht lands of Mata- 
i-hin — The Disbursing Officer of the Canal Zone has 
certified to the Commission that vouchers have been 
prepared and are ready for payment in the name of the 
persons hereinafter named for the purchase of their 
houses and other improvements on the lands of Mata- 
chin. covering claims which have been before the Com- 
mission for consideration. Although these claim.s have 
not as yet been paid, the persons concerned have signed 
a written agreement pledging themselves to accept the 
sums mentioned in payment for the property in ques- 
tion. The record of these claims, showing name, to- 
gether with the tax number of the houses included in the 



Barrett, Aaron A 

Bethune. Henry 

Burglier, Thos. and Thea- 
dosiah 

Byfield, Chailes 

Campbell, David 

Chambers, Jeremiah 

Chambers, Walwin R. and 

Evelina 

Douglas. Codrington.. ... 

Douglas. Codrington 

Dunckley. Sylvia 

Ewers. Margeret 

Hanson, Robert 

Knight, Henry B 

Lawrence, Richard 

Lowyow, Leon 

Pitkin, Stephen 

Rankin, Edward 

Thomas, William 

Viana, Pedro 

Wilson, Margeret 



House 


Reg, 




No. 


No. 




Farm 






only 


28,165 


$15 


61 


28,234 


90 


499 






529 


28,350 


125 


1,728 


27,384 


200 


75 


28.313 


75 


68 


28,162 


40 


445 






1,703 


28,547 


220 


460 


28,310 


Not 


Half 




given 


interest 






476 


28,310 


Not 
given 


14 


28,312 


169 


Farm 


28,549 


IS 


only 






82 






85 


28,462 


110 


589 






590 


28,464 


175 


76 


28,316 


60 


81 


28.320 


55 


79 


28,317 


Not 
given 


578 


28,315 


Not 
given 


460 


Not 


100 


Half 


given 




interest 






1,747 


Not 
given 


350 


45 






49 






57 


28,230 


125 



In view of the agreements before noted, the foregoing 
claims call for no further action by this Commission, 
and they are accordingly dismissed. 

(Signed) Federico Boyd, Roland P. Falkner, 
Samuel Lewis, L. S. Rowe, Commissioneis. 



The two tanks which formerly supplied 
the Gorgona shops with fuel oil will be re- 
crecfed on Sosa Hill, near Balboa. 



Rainfall. August 1 to August 23, 1913, Inclusive. 



Stations. 




a; 


Total for 
rcriod . 


Pacific Section — 


Ins. 

2.61 
2,06 
1.04 
1.10 
1.28 

2.17 
2.13 
1.86 
3.31 
1.94 
1.47 
1.37 
2.63 
2.00 

3.04 


17 
17 
10 
10 
12 

23 
23 
6 
17 
23 
8 
6 
6 
6 

10 


Ins. 
6.58 


Balboa 


5.58 




3.88 




4.81 


Rio Grande 

Central Stclion — 

Culebra 


6.80 
8.28 


*Camacho 


8.84 




9.26 




13.06 




8.73 


Alhajuela 


8.81 


*E1 Vigia 


8.03 




11.98 




6.32 


Atlantic Section — 


9.90 








3.29 
6.06 


10 
10 


12., 38 


tPorto Bello 


18.78 



♦Standard rain gage, readings at 5 p. m. daily; 

automatic rain gage at unstarred stations — values 
midnight to midnighc. 

fTo -S p. m., August 22. 



Stages of the Chagres. 

Maximum height of Chagres River for the week 
ending midnight, Saturday, August 23, 1913. All 
heights are in feet above mean sealevel. 





Stations. 


Dai: and Date. 


Vigia. 


5 


1 

E 

O 


a • 


Sun., August 17 

Mon.. August 18 

Tues.. August 19 

Wed., August 20 

Thurs.. August 21 

Fri.. August 22 


129.3 
129.6 
128.1 
127.4 

ny <; 

vii'.i 

128.6 


94.9 
95.2 
94.8 
93.6 
93.6 
93.7 
94.4 


57.8 
58.1 
58.2 
58.3 
5.S 6 
58.9 
59.2 


SI .1 
57.9 
58.1 
58.3 
58.6 
58. 9 
59.1 






Height of low water to 
nearest foot 


125.0 


91.0 44.0 





•Sluice gates in spillway ot Gatun Dam were closed 
on June 27, 1913, with lake at elevation 48.25. 



August 27, 1913. 



THE C'AiNAL^RECORD 



EXECUTIVE ORDERS. 

Appointment of Richard Lee Metcalfe Member of 
the Isthmian Canal Commission. 

Richard Lee Metcalfe is hereby appointed a 
member of the Isthmian Canal Commission 
at the rate of Fourteen Thousand Dollars 
($14,000) per annum, effective this date. 

Commissioner Metcalfe will be allowed the 
use of a furnished dwelling house on the Isth- 
mus of Panama and will be allowed and paid 
his actual and necessary expenses while away 
from the Isthmus on official business. 

WooDRow Wilson. 
The White House, 
August 9, 1913. 

[No. 1S12.1 

ProWding for the Protection of Birds and their 
Nests in the Canal Zone. 

By virtue of the authority vested in me, I 
hereby establish the following Executive Or- 
der for the Canal Zone; 

Section 1. It shall be unlawful for any 
person to hunt, trap, capture, wilfully disturb, 
or kill any bird of any kind whatever, or to 
take the eggs of any bird, except in the form 
and manner permitted by the regulations pro- 
vided for by this Order. 

Section 2. The Isthmian Canal Commis- 
sion, or the Governor of the Panama Canal 
after the reorganization is established, is here- 
by empowered and directed to enact suitable 
regulations, from time to time, for the protec- 
tion of birds and their nests, and prescribing 
the form and manner in which birds may be 
hunted, and those that shall not be molested. 

Section 3. A violation of any of the regu- 
lations established under this Order shall be 
punished by a fine of not more than one hun- 
dred (100) dollars or by imprisonment for not 
more than thirty days for each offense. 

Section 4. This Order shall take effect 
thirty days after its publication in The Canal 
Record. 

WooDROw Wilson. 

The White House, , 

March 19, 1913. 

(Published in The Canal Record of April 9. 1913.) 



Pursuant to Section 2 of the above Execu- 
tive Order, the following regulations for the 
protection of birds and their nests in the Canal 
Zone are enacted by the Isthmian Canal Com- 
mission: 

Section 1. Birds' nests and eggs shall not 
be taken nor wilfully destroyed or disturbed. 

Section 2. No bird shall be held or sold, 
nor shall any bird be snared, trapped, or cap- 
tured by any device, except native, or foreign 
live cage birds known as parrots, parrakeets, 
macaws, skylarks, and canaries. 

Section 3. Exceptingthe hereinafter named 
game birds, and excepting birds of prey in 
pursuit of their quarry, no bird shall be hunted 
or killed, shot at or wilfully disturbed. 

Section 4. During the periods specified, 
but at no other times, the following named 
game birds may be hunted and killed, but 
only by a person holding a license to hunt in 
the Canal Zone: 

From and including June 1 , to and including 
October 15 of every year: 

The various species of native wild 

ducks, pigeons and doves, and the native 

game birds belonging to the families of 

birds known as quail, currasows and 

guans. 

From and includingOctober 15, to and includ- 
ing January 31 of every year: 



{a) The migratory ducks known as 
blue- winged teel, broad-bill, mallard, pin- 
tail, and shoveler. 

(b) The migratory shore-birds known 
as Wilson's or jack-snipe, and those 
known as yellow-legs. 

Section 5. The taking of all birds, their 
nests and eggs for purely scientific purposes 
may be authorized by the Chairman of the 
Isthmian Canal Commission, or by the Gover- 
nor of the Panama Canal, provided that any 
person desiring such authority shall first sub- 
mit in writing satisfactory evidence of his or 
her object which shall be endorsed by some 
known ornithologist, or the head of a scientific 
institution of good standing. 

Section 6. Possession of a bird, or any part 
thereof, plumage, nest, or egg shall be prima 
facie evidence of the violation of these regula- 
tions upon the part of the person having it in 
possession. 

Geo. W. Goethals, 
Chairman and Chief Engineer. 
Culebra, C. Z., August 22, 1913. 



CONCRETE PLANT CLOSED. 



Changes at Pedro Miguel. 

The Commission hotel at Pedro Miguel will 
be dismantled within the next few days, and 
will not be rebuilt. Arrangements have been 
made by the Subsistence Department to con- 
vert a part of the building containing the 
European laborers' mess into a dining room 
for tlie gold employes, the two sections to be 
entirely independent. The commissary, 
formerly at Gorgona, will be reerected at 
Pedro Miguel on a site, on the east side of the 
track, near the present railroad station, at a 
point where a flower bed existed until a few 
days ago. Other changes in the settlement 
consist of the dismantling and reerection on 
higher ground of bachelor quarters Nos. 100, 
101, 104, and 105, using the material to con- 
struct eight smaller buildings; the removal of 
cottages Nos. 91 to 99, inclusive, to sites 
selected by the landscape architect; raising 
houses Nos. 85 to 89, inclusive, under which 
concrete piers will be placed; removal of the 
building in the rear of the hotel, formerly 
used by the waiters, to Balboa, and the re- 
moval of house No. 106, occupied by the 
commissary help, also to Balboa. The police 
station, formerly at Gorgona, has been reerec- 
ted at Pedro Miguel, and the material from 
the Gorgona clubhouse is on the ground. 



Suggested Method for Shipping Employes* House- 
hold Goods. 

If employes of the Canal Commission, the 
Panama railroad, and of the contractors en- 
gaged in Canal work, will check their per- 
sonal effects and household goods as baggage, 
properly boxed, the shipments will be unload- 
ed as soon as the ship docks at New York, and 
can then be passed by the customs inspector, 
and forwarded the same day to an out-of-town 
destination. In this way, the delay in New 
York incident to waiting for freight to be 
discharged from ship will be obviated, and the 
shipper will be saved the expense incurred 
by entry through the office of a customs 
broker. 



Mixing Plant No. 1 at Catun, Largest in Canal 
Work, Being Dismantled. 

The dismantling of the large concrete 
mixing plant on the west side of Gatun Locks, 
known as plant No. 1, or the permanent mix- 
ing plant, was begun on Saturday, August 16. 
Three of the eigljt 64-cubic foot Chicago cube 
mixers have been lifted out to date, and the 
superstructure and electric tracks for serving 
material to the mixers and carrying concrete 
to the cableways have been removed. The 
Atlantic Division completed on August 15 
the work of decking the lower approach and 
wing walls, allotted to it from the First 
Division, and its remaining work in the locks 
comprises a few parapets and the control 
house. The three last charges mixed at 
plant No. 1 were placed in a manhole of the 
permanent duct line from the hydroelectric 
station, at the spillway to the locks, on the 
morning of August 16. That afternoon, the 
dismantling began. The first concrete de- 
livered from this plant was on August 24, 
1909, for the floor of the upper lock; the plant 
has thus been in ser\'ice almost four years . 
During that time, it has mixed over 1,600,000 
cubic yards of concrete. A description of the 
plant, with its electric services from the 
stock piles and to the cableways, was published 
in The Canal Record of September 1, 1909. 

The auxiliary plant, of two 2-cubic yard mix- 
ers, situated east of the upper approach to the 
locks, was closed on March 11, 1912, after 
operation since December 31, 1909, and 
dismantled shortly afterward. The third 
large plant, erected to supply concrete for the 
spillway of Gatun Dam. and equipped with 
two 2-yard mixers, remains in service. Con 
Crete work for the spillway was 98.53 per cent 
completed on August 1; the placing of con- 
crete in the walls of the hydroelectric station 
has just begun. The Atlantic Division is now 
operating two J-yard portable mi.xers at the 
locks, for paving slope on the east dam, and 
constructing the control house. 

The estimate of concrete to be placed in the 
locks by the Atlantic Division, was 2,043,730 
cubic yards. The amount actually placed, 
as shown by monthly place measurements up 
to June 1, 1913, and by bucket measurement 
since that date, is approximately 2,045,000 
cubic yards. The difference between the 
amount estimated and the amount placed 
is thus about one hundredth of one per cent 
in the masonry estimate for the largest con- 
crete structure ever built 

The following records, from The Canal 
Record, and other official reports, give the 
best daily, monthly, and yearly outputs from 
the lock plants at Gatun: 

Dav. Month. Fiscal year. 
Cubic yards 4,443 89.J91 911.137 

♦ 



Dr. C. A. Hearne, quarantine officer at 
Colon and Cristobal, has oeen detailed to 
visit the native village of San Juan on the 
Pequeni River, and inquire into the unusual 
mortality, which is reported to have taken 
place among the inhabitants at that point. 



Missing Men. 

Any one having information regarding the 
whereabouts of Mr. Gibson B. Smith, former- 
ly in the Tenth LInited .States Infantry, is re- 
quested to communicate with the American 
Legation, Panama. 

Any one having information regarding the 
whereabouts of Mr. Lawrence Madden, who 
is believed to be on the Isthmus, is requested 
to communicate with Mr. Joseph F. Merritt, 
858 Junction avenue, Detroit, Mich. 



Lost — At Bas Obispo, or Gorgona shops, a gold signet 
ring set with a moonstone. "A. J. Mettler" engraved 
on inside. Reward, if returned to Mr. Robert Richard- 
son. House 8.1. Room 8. Cristobal. 



THE CANAL R.ECORD 



Vol. VII, No. 1. 



OFFICIAL CIRCULARS. 



St«amsbip Accommodations for Gold Employes 
Leaving the Service In October. 

CULEBRA. C. Z.. August 27, 1913. 
Heads of Departments and Divisions: 

It is anticipated that, in view of the reduction in 
force, beginning on or about October 10. there will be 
an exceptionally heavy demand for accommodations on 
Panama railroad steamers sailing shortly after that 
date. In order to meet this situation, it is desired, 
so far as possible, all accommodations on the steamer 
Colon, sailing October 12; Ancon, sailing on or about 
October 13; Advance, sailing October 18. and Panama, 
sailing October 23, be reserved exclusively for employes 
leaving the service. 

Applications for leave of absence with requests for 
transportation on any of the above sailings will not 
be approved unless good and suiHcient reasons therefor 
are submitted, and employes are urgently requested to 
make their arrangements accordingly. 

Geo. W. Goethals, 
Chairman, Is'.hmian Canal Commission. 
President, Panama Railroad Company. 



Rules Governing Sules of Material. 

Culebra. C. Z., August 23, 1913. 
Circular No. 399-b: 

1. Effective September 1, 1913, Circular No. 399-A 
is cancelled, and the following rules will govern sales 
of material. 

2. Sales of material, supplies, and equipment, in- 
cluding fabricated articles, rock, sand, and gravel, and 
excluding only sales of medical and surgical supplies, 
and sales of school books and supplies, which latter 
may continue to be sold by the Chief Sanitary Officer, 
and the Superintendent of Schools, as now authorized, 
will be made by the Chief Quartermaster, as follows: 

a. Material and supplies tliat can be spared may 
be sold to officers and emplo^'es of the Isthmian 
Canal Commission and the Panama Railroad Com- 
pany, and other departments of the United States 
Government, for their personal use, and to clubs, 
societies, and other organizations of such em- 
ployes. 

6. Material and supplies that can be spared may 
be sold to the Canal Zone Government. Panama 
Railroad Company. Commission clubhouses, and 
to other departments of the United States Govern- 
ment, also to steamship companies and their agents 
for use on ships. 

c. Material and supplies that can be spared and 
are not obtainable in the local markets, may be 
sold to individuals and companies, except that if 
the amount of sale in any case exceeds $250, prior 
authority from the Chairman must first be ob- 
tained. 

3. SALES OF material: 

a. Sales o/ regular stock material and supplies, 
fabricvled articles, rock, sand, and gravel. Request 
for purchase should be made through the Chief 
Quartermaster. Culebra, who will deliver the 
material through the nearest storehouse from 
which the material can be supplied, at price book 
prices, plus the usual surcharge, except in such 
cases as may be otherwise provided for by con- 
tract. 

6. Sales of second-hand lumber, second-hand roof- 
ing, and other miscellaneous second-hand material. 
Request for purchase should be made through 
the Chief Quartermaster, who will deUver the 
material at the point where it is available, at prices 
set by the Board of Appraisal. 

c. Sales of Surplus and obsolete material thai has 
been turned into the storehause for obsolete material at 
Mount Hope Requests for purchase of this class 
of material should be made direct upon the Depot 
Quartermaster at Mount Hope, who will be given 
blanket authority to make sales of such material, 
at prices set by the Board of Appraisal, a detailed 
report of such sales to be made monthly to the 
Chief Quartermaster. 

4. sales of equipment: 

a. Sales of all surplus and obsolete equipment 
turned in by the various departments and divisions 
will be handled exclusively by the Chief Quarter- 
master. 

6. The Quartermaster's Department will act as 
sales agent for the Panama Railroad Company 
in the sale or disposition of any surplus or obsolete 
equipment retired by that company. 

c. All inquiries from prospective purchasers of 
equipment should be referred to the Chief Quarter- 
master. 

5. BOARD OF appraisal: 

a. The value of all second-hand material, obso- 
lete or surplus material, and of all equipment 
offered for sale, shall be appraised by the Board of 
Appraisal, appointed by the Chairman, which shall 
meet weekly. The Board of Appraisal shall fix 



the selling price for auch material, supplies, and 
equipment. After such prices are approved by the 
Chairman, sales may be made by the Chief Quar- 
termaster without additional authority, at the 
prices thus fLxed, to an amount in any one case of 
$100. 

b. All requests for appraisal of material, supplies, 
and equipment will be forwarded to the Board of 
Appraisal through the Chief Quartermaster, who 
will submit all data available with the request. 

c- The Chief Quartermaster will furnish all 
necessary clerical work for the proper keeping of 
the records of the board, and will keep the files of 
all papers in connection therewith. 
6. Terms of SaU — All sales shall be made on a cash 

basis unless otherwise specifically au,,horized by the 

Chairman, except the followinf^; 

a. Sales to other departments of the United 
States Government, the Canal Zone Government, 
the Panama railroad, the Commission clubhouses, 
and the Republic of Panama. 

b. Sales to contractors with the Isthmian Canal 
Commission or Panama Railroad Company, and to 
steamship companies, and others, in cases where 
such individuals or companies secure payment for 
the material, supplies and equipment, by making 
a deposit of cash or satisfactory certified check, 
or by giving a bond in form, with sureties satis- 
factory to the Examiner of Accounts of the Com- 
mission, in an amount to be fixed by the Chief 
Quartermaster to cover the line of credit which it 
is deemed advisable to grant, and condition'^d upon 
the payment forsuch material, supplies and equip- 
ment within thirty days from the close of the 
month within which delivery of the material, sup- 
plies, or equipment is made. 

c. Sales to contractors with the Isthmian Canal 
Commission and the Panama Railroad Company, 
and to steamship companies, in cases where the 
Isthmian Canal Commission or the Panama rail- 
road is indebted to such contractors or companies 
for material furnished or services rendered by them 
to the Commission or the railroad company, in an 
amount equal to or in excess of the value of any 
material, supplies, or equipment sold. 

7. FREIGHT charges: 

a. On second-hand, surplus, and obsolete ma- 
terial and equipment, shipment over the Panama 
railroad will be made at the expense of the pur- 
chaser, unless otherwise provided for in the terms 
of sale. 

b. The purchaser will, however, be granted the 
freight rates fixed by the tariff for Isthmian Canal 
Commission business, effective January 1. 1907, 
and supplements thereto, namely. $2.25 a ton of 
2,000 pounds, minimum carload weight 20,000 
pounds, and minimum charge of 20 cents. $50 for 
each movement' dead weight in train, for special 
equipmeni., such as steamshovels, locomotives, 
cranes, and pile drivers, and $5 for each empty 
car. If the general local tariS rates are lower than 
the rates specified above such rates will apply. 

8. DUTY PAYABLE : 

a. Material, supplies, and equipment sold for 
use within the Republic of Panama and the Canal 
Zone, shall be subject to payment of customs duty 
by the purchaser to the Republic of Panama. 

b. Delivery of such material, supplies, and equip- 
ment will not be made to the purchaser until he 
shall have presented to the depot quartermaster 
at Mount Hope, or to the district quartermaster 
at Ancon. two copies of bill covering sale, on which 
are endorsed certificates signed by the Treasurer 
of the Republic of Panama or his authorized repre- 
sentative in Panama or Colon, that customs duties 
on such material, supplies, and equipment have 
been paid, or have been remitted. 

c. This provision shall not apply, however, to 
sales made: 

1. To individuals and companies who have 
been granted blanket authority by the Re- 
public of Panama to make purchases without 
payment of customs duties. 

2. To the Panama Railroad Company, the 
Canal Zone Government, other departments of 
the United States Government, or contractors 
with the Commission or the Panama Railroad 
Company when articles purchased are for use 
in connection with their contracts- 

3. To steamship companies and other indi- 
viduals and companies when the articles pur- 
chased are for use solely outside of the terri- 
torial limits of the Canal Zone and the Re- 
public of Panama. 

4. To churches and charitable organiza- 
tions. 

5. To officers and employes of the Isthmian 
Canal Commission and the Panama Railroad 
Company, officers and enlisted men of the 
United States Array, Navy, and Marine Corps, 
or officers and employes of other departments 



of the United States Government, where the 
articles are purchased for personal use. 

6. To clubs, societies, or other organiza- 
tions of such officers, employes, and enlisted 
men in the Government service. 

Geo. W. Goethals, 
Chairman, Isthmian Canal Commission. 
President, Panama Railroad Company. 

Physical Inventory of French Property. 

Culebra, C. Z., August 20, 1913. 
Circular No. 497: 

Effective August 30, 1913, an inventory will be taken 
by all accountable officers of all French property, ma- 
terial, and equipment stored, or in use in the various 
departments and divisions. Great care must be taken 
to see that this inventory is properly compiled and full 
information must be shown, so that every article listed 
thereon can be readily identified. This is to be an actual 
physical inventory, and noc to be taken from the prop- 
erty records. 

When inventories are completed they should be 
transmitted direct to the Examiner of Accounts. 
Geo. W. Goethals. 
Chairman and Chief Engineer. 



Surcharges on Labor- 

CULEBRA, C. Z., July 31, 1913. 
Circular No. 169-n: 

Effective August 1, 1913, the following surcharges on 
labor, without machinery, for supervision and use of 
tools, will be applied: 

BETWEEN DEPARTMENTS AND DIVISIONS OF THE COMMIS- 
SION, GOVERNMENT OF THE CANAL ZONE. AND THE 
PANAMA RAILROAD COMPANY. 

On silver labor Ten per cent. 

On gold labor Twenty-five per cent. 

FOR INDIVIDUALS AND COMPANIES. 

On silver labor Fifteen per cent. 

On gold labor Forty per cent. 

All previous circulars relating to sure harges'on labor 
are modified accordingly. 

Geo. W. Goethals, 
Chairman and Chief Engineer. 



Permanent Shops at Balboa. 

Culebra, C. Z., August 26, 1913. 
Circular No. 498: 

The permanent shops at Balboa will hereafter be 
known and designated as the "Balboa shops." 

The shops operated by the Sixth Division and here- 
tofore known as the Balboa shops will hereafter be 
known and designated as the "Shipways shops." 
Geo. W. Goethals, 
Chairman and ChieJ Engineer. 

Showing Location of Equipment on Survey 
Request. 

Culebra, C. Z., August 26, 1913. 
Circular No. 323-d: 

Accountable officers presenting rolling stock and 
other equipment for survey are required to show on 
survey requests, location of such equipment, so that 
the surveying officer can readily locate and pass on 
same, and such equipment will not be removed from 
location shown on survey requests until after survey 
has been made and approved by this office, unless the 
surveying officer shall have been notified of the re- 
moval. Geo. W. Goethals, 

Chairman. 

Shop Expense Percentages. 

Culebra, C. Z., August 22, 1913. 
Heads of Departments and Divisions; 

In accordance with the provisions of Circular No. 
169-E, the following shop expense percentage for each 
shop is hereby fixed, effective September 1, 1913, and 
will be applied, until further orders, to the distributed 
labor used in all shop work, in accordance with the pro. 
visions of Circular No. 264-A, viz: 

Shop 
expense 
Division or shop. percentura. 

Mechanical Division 50 

Dry dock shop 60 

Balboa shop 25 

Porto Bello 40 

Toro Point 40 

Circular letter from this office dated March 29, 
1913. is revoked. 

Geo. W. Goethals, 
Chairman and Chief Engineer. 



Sample Shiptnents. 

Culebra, C. Z., August 22. 1913. 
Heads of Departments and Divisions; 

Several cases have recently been brought to the at- 
tention of this office in which samples of material to b« 
used for testing and other purposes in connection with 
Commission work have been ordered by •mployei 



August 27, 1913. 



THE CANAL RECORD 



under personal consignment, which results in annoyanct 
to both the employe and this office in adjusting trans- 
portation charges. 

In the future, when a sample shipment is desired 
for official purposes, the same must be obtained through 
the Quartermaster's Department. 

Geo. W. Goethals, 

Chairman. 

Appointment of Port Captain at Cristobal. 

CULEBRA. C. Z., August 20, 1913. 
Circular No. 410-c: 

Mr. R. \V. Bergin, receiving and forwarding agent. 
Colon, is hereby appointed captain of the port of Cris- 
tobal, effective September 15, 1913. vice Mr. J. St. C. 
Hunt. 

Geo. W. Goethals. 

Chairman. 



COMMISSION CLUBHOUSES. 



RemoTal of Track over Dike at Gatun Locks. 

Gatun, C. Z.. August 37, 1913. 
To All Concerned — The track across the dike at the 
north end of Gatun Locks will be broken at 7 a. ra., 
on September 2, by the removal of the steel truss 
bridge over which this track passes. 

Wm. L. SiBERT, 

Division Engincn. 

New Account in Classified Expenditures. 
Empire, C Z., August 19, 1913. 
Circular No. 48: 

The following new account in classified expenditures 
of th:; Isthmian Canal Commission is hereby authorized 
in the Department of Construction and Engineering — 
general: 

Account 352 — permanent town sites. 
To this account will be charged all expenses 
incurred in connection with the construction of 
permanent tovn sites in the Canal Zone, includ- 
ing salaries and wages, material and supplies, 
and other incidental expenses in connection there- 
with. 

H. A. A. Smith. 
Approved : Examiner of Accounts. 

Geo. W. Goethals, 
Chairman. 



Ice and Cold Storage Deliveries. 

Panama Railrc^d Commissary Department, 

Cristobal. C. Z.. August 20, 1913. 
Circular No. 459-a: 

To All Concerned — Circular No. 459, published in The 
Canal Record of August 13, is amended, as follows, 
effective today: 

Deliveries will be made as specified but only to 
those employes on the gold roll who are entitled to 
make application for Commission and Panama rail- 
road quarters. John Burke. 
Approved: Manager. 
F. O. Whitlock, 

Acting Subsistence OJJicer. 



Eflectlve Date of New Panama Railroad Time- 
table. 
Panama Railroad Company, 
Office of General Superintendent, 

Colon. R. P.. August 23, 1913. 
Circular No. 177: 

All Concerned — Circular No. 162, dated August 16, 
1913, in regard to abandoning Gorgona and Matachin 
stations and printing of new time table, should read 
that the new time card will be put into effecc on Tues- 
day, September 2, 1913, instead of Monday, September 
2. 1913. John D. Patterson, 

General Superintendent. 



Panama Railroad Parlor Car Service. 

PANA^L\ Railro.\d Company. 
Office of General Superintendent, 

Colon, R. P.. August 19. 1913. 
Circular No. 172: 

All Concerned — Circular No. 138, dated July IS. in 
regard to parlor car service on Panama railroad trains. 
is hereby cancelled. Effective August 17, parlor car 
service will be maintained on the regular schedule, as 
iadicated in pocket timetable No. 14. 

John D. Patterson, 
General Superintendent. 



Cbang« in Colon Local Freight Agency. 
Panama Railroad Company, 
Office of General Superintendent. 
Colon. R. P., August 16. 1913. 
Circular No. 161: 

All Conterned — Effective September 15. 1913, the 
Colon local freight agency will be segregated from the 
Colon freight department, and Mr. J. C. Warren is 
appointed local freight agent, effective on that date, 
reporting to th« freight and passenger agent. 

J. D. Patterson, 
GmutoI Superintendent. 



Activities of the Young Men's Christian Associa- 
tion. 

general. 

Nearly 100 entries have been received for the athletic 
and aquatic meet to be held at Corozal on Labor Day, 
September 1. The athletic events will begin at 9 a. m.. 
and the aquatic events at 2 p. m. There will be a special 
train to take the spectators to the point at which the 
aquatic events are to be held. Music will be provided 
by the bands from the Marine Corps and Tenth In 
fantry. The work on the ahtletic field has been com- 
pleted, and special arrangements are being made for 
the handling of the crowds that are expected. 

The schedule for moving pictures for the week. Sep- 
tember 1 to 6 is, as follows: Monday, Culebra; Tues- 
day, Cristobal; Wednesday, Gatun; Thursday. Coro- 
zal; Friday. Empire and Porto Bello. 

COROZAL. 

The Culebra basketball team defeated the Corozal 
team by a score of 18 to 16 on Saturday, August 23. 
The game was closely contested from start to finish. 

The standing in the handicap tenpin tournament is, 
as follows: Albert, first; Ward, second; Walker, 
third. 

High scores in bowling for the week are, as follows: 

Tenpins— Bovdt. 205, 204; Start, 202. 200; VMUer. 
201, 213; Whiston, 204. DurAfms— Burke, 106; 
Beall, 108. 

The funeral services of the late Frank Dewitt Gar- 
trell were held at St- Luke's Chapel, Ancon, under the 
auspices of the Corozal Y. M. C. A., on Sunday after- 
noon, August 24. Mr. Gartrell was an enthusiastic 
supporter of the Y. M. C. A., and expecially interested 
in the chess and checker clubs. A number of the 
prominent chess and checker players have drawn up a 
set of resolutions in his memory. 

In addition to the athletic and aquatic meet to be 
held at Corozal on Labor Day, there will be an invi- 
tation bowling tournament under the management of 
the Corozal Y. M. C. A., in which all Y. M. C. A. 
bowlers are invited to participate. Suitable medals will 
be offered as prizes. 

culebra. 

On Friday evening, August 22, a "Smokeless smoker" 
was held under the auspices of the Culebra Y. M. C. A., 
at the srhoolhouse. The following program was ren- 
dered: Mandolin orchestra. Messrs. Ramsey. Ar- 
buckle and Pearsall; piano solo. Mr. Pearsall; reading, 
Mr. Silver; soprano solo, Mrs. Frank Roberts; selec- 
tion, mandolin orchestra; exhibition with handcuffs. 
Carolo Rodriguez; "Twelve minutes in China," 
Messrs. Aaron and Homer; exhibition of roller skating. 
Miss Edith Carson. The orchestra played before and 
after the program. Refreshments of ice cream, home- 
made cake, and lemonade were served. 

At the service on Sunday evening. Rev. Harry 
Corapton gave an address on the subject, "Forget it." 

High scores in tenpins during the week are. as follows 
Grossberg, 216; Dougherty, 223, 212, 202; Case, 201. 

EMPIRE. 

The Empire glee club gave a very enjoyable con- 
cert on Sunday evening, August 24. at which about 
150 people were present. The program was. as follows: 
Prelude, piano solo. "Rachmaninoff," by Mrs. J. F. 
Storing; mixed chorus, "They that sow in tears." 
from "The Holy City;" soprano solo. "Calm as the 
night." Bohm. by Mrs. J. L. Caldwell; solos, duet, 
and chorus. "Christian, the morn breaks sweetly o'er 
thee," Shelley; soprano solo by Mrs. Young; bass solo 
by Mr, F. C. Conner; tenor solo and chorus, "Seek 
ye the Lord." Roberts. Mr. H. W. Dohrmann and 
chorus; soprano solo, "Oh. dry those tears," Mrs. 
Roberts; chorus. "Thine is the kingdom." from "The 
Holy City," by the glee club. Mrs. J. F. Storing was 
accompanist, and Mr. H. W. Dohrmann musical direc- 
or. 

About 250 men attended the "Smoker" given on 
Monday evening, August 18. The program consisted 
of moving pictures, tenor solos, wTestling. and fencing 
bouts, piano solos, and fancy roller skating. Refresh- 
ments were served. 

The Culebra basketball team played the Empire team 
on Wednesday evening, August 20. and was defeated, 
58 to 13. 

GATUN. 

The musical smoker held on Saturday evening, Au- 
gust 23. drew a large attendance. The program was, 
as follows: Tenth Infantry orchestra, opening selection; 
Edith Carson, roller skating; Aaron and Homer, piano 
duet; Otis. Burraeister, and Morrison, Barbadian 
talk: Tenth Infantr>^ squad. Army calischenici; 
Ramsey and Arbuckle. mandolin duet; McSparran and 
Simon, fencing match; Camp Elliott squad, saxaphone 
sextet; Aaron and company. "Thirteen minutes in 
China;" C. C Pearsall, piano solo; Thomas Riley, 
ballad singing; Ed. King, Irish yodeling; Prince Rajah, 
Hindoo magic; Quyan and Huber, wrestling match. 

The Taoth Infantry band.will give^a concert at the 



Gatun Y. M. C. A. on Saturday evening. August 30. 
The admission prices will be. members, free; nonmem- 
bers, 50 cents; children, 25 cents. All seats will be 
reserved. The band will be assisted by several prom- 
inent vocalists. 

The standing of the popular handicap pool tourna- 
ment on Saturday evening. August 23, was, as follows: 
Name. Won. Lost. P.C. 

Bailey 2 1.000 

Townsley 2 1.000 

O'Hara 2 .... 1.000 

Kerruish 2 1.000 

Dewey 1 1.000 

Pettitt 1 1 500 

Johnson 1 1 500 

Carkeet 1 1 500 

Dennis I 2 333 

Hammill 1 000 

Von 1 000 

Reisner 1 000 

Gray 2 000 

Bradley 2 000 

Wall 2 000 

A large crowd was present on Wednesday evening 
August 20, at the north end of Gatun Locks, when 
swimming events were conducted by the local Y. M. 
C. A. The results of the men's relay race were, as fol- 
lows: First, Locks team — J. Mitchell, captain. Huber, 
Joe Smith. Wright. Seiond, First Division team — Reis- 
ner, captain, Schutt, Dustheimer, Gray. Third, dredge 
team — Parsons, captain, Forstrom, Gardner, I arcsson. 
Fourth. M cCliniic-M ar shall team — D. C. Galloway, 
captain, W. Galloway. Roberts. Farle>. Fifth, 
testing engiiiter s team — Seeley, captain, Shaw, Wa- 
them. Kyes. Sixth, spillway team — Porter, captain, 
Desvey, Waster, Walker. 

The boys finished in a 75-yard swim in the following 
order: Atkins, Sisson, Christian, F. Garrison, Kerr, 
P. Baker, G. Butcher, C. Dewey. H. Butcher, D. 
Grant. 

The results of the indoor baseball games in the week 
ending August 23 were: Won — First Division, Mc- 
Clintic Marshall office. Transportation, First Division. 
Lost — First McClintic-Marshall field. Commissary, 
Second McClintic-Marshall field. Commissary. 

CRISTOBAL. 

The Cristobal ladies reversed their defeat by the 
Gatun ladies' duckpin team by winning all three games 
on the Cristobal alleys on Wednesday. August 20. 
The totals were, as follows: 
Cristobal... 415 419 390 Gatun 36$ 402 383 

The Cristobal tenpin team won from the Empire 
team, two out of three, on Saturday, August 23, by the 
following scores: 

Empire. Cristobal. 

Simms 168 159 134 Harrison... 154 211 ISO 

Patterson... 182 156 136 Buser 162 172 142 

Beattie 192 150 151 Collins 174 158 170 

Gilmore 138 172 157 Bamum 178 !36 225 

Gustavson.. 175 177 190 Bullard 175 228 170 



855 814 768 S43 905 857 

Mr. G. R. Raymond, handcuff aitist, assisted in the 
entertainment at the moving picture show on Saturday 
nii;ht. August 23. 

The first regulai meeting of the discussion club was 
held on Tuesday. August 26. After the committee 
on nominations and the ronstitut ion had reported 
Mr. W. B. Childers of Gatun led in the discussion' 
using as his theme, "Natural law in the world of labor." 
Interest in the chess club is increasing. Tuesday 
night, .\ugust 26. was devoted to considering the Ruy 
Lopez opening and the various masters ' notations on it. 
Mr. Wm. Dubois of Culebra will play a simultaneous 
chess match with the members of the Cristobal club 
at Cristobal on Saturday night, August 30. 



Tide Table. 

The foUow'ing table shows the time of high and low 
tides at Panama for the week ending Sept. 6, 1913: 



Date. 


Low 


High 


Low 


High 


Low 




A.M. 


A.M. 
2.53 
3.40 
4.25 
5.07 

5.50 
6.34 
7.18 


A.M. 

9.07 

9.54 
10.38 
11.23 

P.M. 
12.09 
12.55 

1.44 


P.M. 
3.12 
4.00 
4.45 
5.29 

6.13 
7 00 
7.48 


P.M. 
9.28 


Sept 1. 




10.15 


Sept. 2 




11.00 


Sept 3. 




11.45 


Sept 4 






Sept. S 

Sept. 6 


12.28 
1.15 





75th meridian time. 



LOST — On Wednesday morning, .^ucust 13, a watch 
chain and fob on or near Cristobal beach. The fob 
beais the letterj "A. V. F. S." Finder is requested 
to return article to Cristobal Y. M. C. A.. a«d i«oaiv< 
reward. 



THE CANAL RECORD 



Vol VII, No. 1. 



CANAL DIRBCTORY. 

ISTHMIAN C ANAL C OMMISSION. 

Col. Geo. W. Goethals, U. S. A., Chair- 
man and Chief Engineer, Culebra. 

Col. H. F. Hodges, U. S. A., Culebra. 

Ueut.-Col. D. D. Gaillard, U. S. A., Empire. 

Lieut. -Col. Wm. L. Sibert, U. S. A., Gatun. 

Civil Engineer H. H. Rousseau, IT. S. N.. 
Culebra. 

Col. W. C. Gorgas, U. S. A., Ancon. 

Mr. Richard Iv. Metcalfe, Ancon. 
Mr. Joseph Bucklin Bishop, 

Secretary, Ancon. 

DBPARTMENTS. 



W. H. Bates, Superintendent Steamshovel Re- 
pairs. 
Hartley Rowe, Electrical Superintendent. 



Maj. Robert E. Noble. General Inspector. 
Harry E. Bovay, Chief Clerk. 



Construction and Engineering. 

Office of The Chairman. 

Col. Geo. W. Goethals, Chairman and Chief 
Engineer. 

William Howard May, Secretary to the 
Chairman. 
C. A. Mcllvaine. Chief Clerk. 
W. P. Copeland. Assistant Chief Clerk. 
Ad. Faure, Chief Accountant. 
H. S. Parish, Surveying Officer. 
I^ieat. Geo. R. Goethals. U. S. A., Assistant En- 
gineer. FortificRtions. 
Office of The Chief Engineer. 
First Division. 
Col. H.F. Hodges, Assistant Chief Engineer. 
C. O. Carlson. Secretary. 
Edward Schildhauer, Electrical and Mechanical 

Engineer. 
Henry Goldmark. T. B. Monuiche. Designing 

Engineers. 
Walter F. Beyer. Assistant Engineer. 
Second Division. 

Civil Engineer H. H. Rousseau, Assistant 
to the Chief Engineer. 

J. J. Campbell. Secretary. 
Lieut -Col. T. C. Dickson, U. S. A.. Inspector of 

Shops. 
A. B. Nichols, Office Engineer. 
Ci\nl Engineer F. H. Cooke, U. S. N.. Designing 

Engineer. 
O. E. Malsbury. Assistant Engineer. 
J. A. Walker. Superintendent Balboa Ter- 

mina's. 
W. L. Phillips, Landscape Architect. 

F. D. Willson. Supervisor. 

James G. Craig, Traveling Engineer 
J. E- Johnson. Insoector of Lubricants and 
Equipment 

Third Division. 

(Abolished.) 
Fourth Division. 
Office of the Chief Clerk. 
Fifth Division. 
Headquarters, Corozal. 
H. O. Cole, Resident Engineer. 
J. C. Keller. Chief Clerk 
R. B. Tin<;Iey. Superintendent, Locks. 
J. A. McCiilloch» Superintendent, Steamshovel 

Excavation. 
J. A. Loulan. Superintendent, Ancon Quairy. 
W.J. Holmts. Trainmaster. 
W. D. Stanton. Assistant Engineer. 
Sixth Division. 
Headquarters. Balboa. 
W. G. Comber, Resident Engineer. 

James Macfarlane, Superintendent of Dredg- 
ing. _ 

Central Division, 

Headquarters, PImpire. 
Lieut. -Col. D. D. Gaillard, Division Engi- 
neer. 

W. I Beam. Chief Clerk. 
A. S. Zinn. Resident Engineer. 
W. T. Reynolds. Superintendent Construction. 
J. M. Hagan, Superintendent Construction. 
M. W. Tenny, Superintendent Construction. 
A. Sessions. Superintendent Transportation. 

G. W. A. Palmer, Assistant P'ngineer. 
Ranee Ferguson, General Foreman, Reloca- 
tion Dumps. 

Wm. Pullman, General Foreman, Water Serv- 
ice. 



Atlantic Division. 

Headquarters. Gatun. 
Lieut. -Col. Wm. L. Sibert, Division Engi- 
neer. 

Lieut.-Col. Wm. V. Judson, U. S. A., Assistant 
Division Engineer. 
Ben Jenkins. Chief Clerk. 
Maj. J. p. Jen-ey, U. S. A.. Resident Engineer. 
Maj. G. M. Hoffman. U. S. A., Resident En- 
gineer. 



Division of Municipal Engineering. 

Headquarters. Gatun- 

Geo. yi. AVells, Resident Engineer. 

Geo. B. Carson. Chief Clerk. 
E. H. Chandler Superintendent. Northern Dis- 
trict, Cristobal. 
Dan E. Wright. Superintendent, Soathern 

District. Ancon. 
W. G. Spalding, Assistant Englaeer, Mira- 

flores. 
J. T. B Bowles, Physiologist, Cristobal. 



Subsistence. 

Headquarters. Cristobal. 
Lieut.-Col. Eugene T. Wilson, U. S. A., Sub- 
sistence Officer. 

Capt. Frank O. Whitlock. U. S. A.. Assistant 
Subsistence Officer. 

John Burke, Manager, Commissary Depart- 
ment. 
W. F. Shipley. Chief Clerk. 



Mechanical Division. 

Headquarters. Empire. 
John J. Eason, Assistant Superintendent. 
F. G. Swanson, Chief Clerk. 
C.W.Fisher, Superintendent of Erection. 



Quartermaster's. 

Headquarters. Culebra. 
Capt. R. E. Wood, U. S. A., Chief Quar- 
termaster. 

Joseph Birnie. Chief Clerk. 

C. B Cook, Inspector, Construction and 
Repairs. 

Frank Holmes, Resident Engineer. Per- 
manent Buildings. 
Mario J. Schiavoni, Architect. 

Capt. C. Nixon, U. S. A., Depot Quartermaster, 

Mount Hope. 
C. L. Parker, Assistant Depot Quartermaster. 

Mount Hope. 
R. K. Morris, Storekeeper. Empire. 
X. D. Holt, Storekeeper. Balboa. 

District Quartermasters. 

B. C. Poole. Ancon and Balboa. 

R. C. Shady, Corozal and Mirafiores. 

O. S. Farrar. Acting. Pedro Miguel and 

Paraiso. 
H. F. .Sedwick, Culebra. 
J H K. Humphrey, Empire. 
Harry Dundas. Las Cascadas and Bas Obispo. 
J. T. Smith, Gatun. 

Roy R, Watson, Cristobal, and Toro Point. 
Chas. D. Morgan. Porto Bello. 

Civil Administration. 

Headquarters, Ancon. 

Richard L. Metcalfe, Head of the Depart- 
ment. 

G. A. Ninas, Chief Clerk. 
C. L. Luedtke. Assistant Chief Clerk. 
Tom M. Cooke. Chief. DiWsion of Posts. Cus- 
toms, and Revenues. Ancon. 
Arthur McGown, Deputy Collector, Ancon. 
James D^ly, Deputy Collector. Cristobal. 
Caot. Chas. W. Barber, U. S. A., Chief of Police, 

Ancon . 
A. G. Belknap. Assistant Chief of Police, 
Ancon. 

C. E. Weidman, Fire Chief, Cristobal. 

Chas. F. Koerner, Assistant Fire Chief, Ancon. 

Frank P. Wagg, Superintendent of Schools, 
Ancon . 

Eugene H. Ash. Treasurer of Canal Zone. Em- 
pire. 

Lieut.-Col. Wm. V. Judson, Chairman, James 
Macfarlane, C.J. Anderson, Board of Local 
Inspectors. 

Canal Zone Judiciary. 

Headquarters. Ancon. 
Supreme Court— H. A. Gudger, Chief Justice. 
Walter Emery, Clerk, Ancon. 
Thomas E- Brown. Jr.. Associate Justice. 
William H. Jackson. Associate Justice. 
Circuit Court, First Circuit— H. A. Gudger, 
Judge. 
Walter Emery, Clerk, Ancon. 
Circuit Court, Second Circuit— William H. Jack- 
son. Judge. 

Elbert M. Goolsby, Clerk, Empire. 
Circuit Court. Third Circuit— Thomas E- 
Brown, Jr., Judge. 
Nelson R. Johnson. Clerk. Cristobal. 
M. C. Rerdell, District Judge, Cristobal. 
S. E. Blackburn, District Judge, Ancon. 
Edgar S. Garrison, District Judge, Empifp. 
» 

La^;t. 

Headquarters. Ancon. 
Frank Feuille, Counsel and Chief Attorne\'. 
William K. Jackson, Prosecuting Attorney. 
Charles R. Williams. Assistant Prosecuting At- 
torney. 
R. S. Carlson. Land Agent. 

Sanitation.' 

Headquarters. Ancon. 

Col. W. C. Gorgas, Chief Sanitary Officer. 

Col. John L. Phillips, U. S. A.. Assistant Chief 
Sanitary Officer. 



Lieut.-Col. Charles F. Mason, U. S. A., Superin- 
tendent Ancon Hospital, Ancon. 

Surgeon C. C. Pierce, U. S P H S.. Superin- 
tendent Colon Hospital. Cristobal. 

Surgeon J. C. Perry, U. S. P. H. S . Chief Quar- 
antine Officer, and Health Officer, Panama. 

Dr. C. A. Hearne, Quarantine Officer. Colon. 

Dr. Matthew J. Hoey, Quarantine Officer, 
Panama. 

Joseph A. LePrince. Chief Sanitary Inspector. 
Ancon. 

Dr. M. E. Connor, Health Officer, Colon. 

Disbursements. 

Headquarters. Enipire. 
John H. McL/ean, Disbursing Officer. 
J. C Wood. Chief Clerk. 
C. E. Gilmore. Cashier. 
E. W. Heverly, Paymaster, Ancon. 
E A. Keeling. Paymaster. Cristobal. 

Hxamination of Accounts. 

Headquarters. Empire. 
H. A. A. Smith, Examiner of Accounts 

T. L- Clear, Assistant P'xaminer of Accounts. 
Ptirchasin;3: Department. 

Headquarters. Washington. D C 
Maj. F. C. Boggs, U. S. A., General Pur- 
chasing Officer. 

C. E. Dole. Chief Clerk 

Capt. Courtland Nixon. Purchasing Agent on 
the Isthmus. 

R. E. Rutherford. Commissary Purchasing 
Officer, 24 State Street, New York City. 

Cppt. William O. Smith. U. S. A.. Assistant 
Purchasing Agent. 614 Whitney-Central Build- 
ing. New Orleans. La. 

Panama Railroad Company* 

Headquarters, Colon. 
(General offices, 24 State Street, New York.) 
John D. Patterson, General Superintendent, 
Colon. 

R. L. Mock, Chief Clerk. 
Lieut. Frederick Mears, U. S. A., Cbief Engineer. 
C. W. Northrop. Chief Dispatcher. 
E S. Waid. Terminal Trainmaster, Colon and 

Cristobal. 
S. W. Heald. Terminal Trainmaster, Panama 
and Balboa. 



MOVEMENT OF OCEAN VESSELS. 



The following is a list of sailings of the Panama 
Railroad Steamship Company; of the Royal Mail 
Steam Packet Company; of the Hamburg-American 
Line, and of the United Fruit Company's Line. 

NEW YORK TO CRISTOBAL. 

Panama P. R. R.. Monday Aug. 25 

Allianca P. R. R. .Saturday Aug. 30 

Colon P. R. R. .Saturday Sept. 6 

Advance P. R. R.. Friday Sept. 12 

Panama P. R. R..Thursday Sept. 18 

CRISTOBAL TO NEW YORK. 

Advance P. R. R. Sunday Aug. 31 

Panama P. R. R. -Saturday . . . .Sept. 6 

Allianca P. R. R.. Thursday Sept. 11 

Colon P. R. R. .Thursday Sept. 18 

Colon P. R. R.. Friday Oct. 24 

Advance P. R. R.. Thursday . ...Oct. 30 

Advance P. R. R..Wednesday. .Sept- 24 

NEW YORK TO COLON. 

Zacapa U. F. C. Wednesday . .Aug. 20 

Emil L. Boas H.-A Saturday. . . .Aug. 23 

Sixaola U. F. C. . Saturday Aug. 23 

Almirante U. F.C.. Wednesday. .Aug. 27 

Oruba R. M... .Saturday. . . .Aug. 30 

COLON TO NEW YORK. 

Metapan U. F. C. Thursday Aug. 28 

Prinz August Wilhelm.H.-A Tuesday Sept. 2 

Tivives U. F. C. Tuesday Sept. 2 

Trent R. M.... Tuesday Sept. 2 

Zacapa U. F. C. Thursday. . . .Sept. 4 

NEW ORLEANS TO COLON. 

Turrialba U. F. C. .Saturday Aug. 23 

CartajiO U. F. C. .Wednesday . .Aug. 27 

Abangarez U. F. C. . Saturday .... Aug. 30 

Heredia U. F. C. .Wednesday. .Sept. 3 

Atenas U. F. C. Saturday. . . .Sept. 6 

Parismina U. F. C. .Wednesday. .Sept. 10 , 

Turrialba U. F. C. . Saturday Sept. 1 3 

COLON TO NEW ORLEANS. 

Atenas U. F. C. . Thursday. . . Aug. 28 

Parismina U. F. C. . Saturday .... Aug. 30 

Turrialba U. F. C. . Thursday Sept. 4 

Cartago U. F. C. . Saturday .... Sept. 6 

Abangares U. F. C. . Thursday. . . . Sept. 1 1 

Heredia U. F. C. .Saturday Sept. 13 



CANAL 




RECORD 



Volume VII. 



ANCON, CANAL ZONE, WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 3, 1913. 



No. 2. 



The Canal Record 

Published weekly under the authority and supervision of 
the Isthmian Canal Commission. 



The Canal Record is published free of charge, one copy 
each to all employes of the Commi'ision and Panama 
Railroad Company whose names are on the sold roll. 
Extra copies and back numbers can be obtained from the 
newsstands of the Panama Railroad Com p at: y for five 
cents each. 



Address all Communications. 

THE CANAL RECORD, 

Ancon, Canal Zone, 

Isthmus of Panama. 

No communication, either for publication or requesting 
information will receive attention unless signed with the 
full name and addrtss of the writer. 



NOTES OF PROGRESS. 



Opening New Passenger Station at Panama. 

The north wing of the new passenger sta- 
tion at Panama will be opened for use about 
Monday, September 8. This, the second- 
class division, will be used by first-class pas- 
sengers while the south wing is being finished. 
The change is made at this time, in order to 
allow the complete removal of the old station, 
the steel work of which is needed in the erec- 
tion of the baggage room in rear of the new 
station. Second-class passengers will, for 
the present, enter the train shed through a 
gate in rear of the old station; temporary 
waiting benches will be provided for them 
under the shed at the alighting platform, 
and tickets will be sold from a booth 
erected under the runway from the platform 
to the old station. It is expected that the 
new station will be placed in full use about 
November 1, 1913. 



Preservation of Retired Equipment. 

Messrs. W. H. Bates, H. S. Parish, and 
C. T. Cushman, have been appointed a com- 
mittee to investigate the most suitable pro- 
tection against deterioration, through cli- 
matic influences, of equipment permanently 
retired from service. The committee is also 
delegated with the work of preparing a set of 
rules and regulations governing the procedure 
to be followed upon the permanent retire- 
ment from service of any piece of each class of 
equipment, and to recommend the most ad- 
vantageous place or places at which the ap- 
plication of the preservative may be made. 



Canal Commission Takes over Panama Street 
Cleaning. 

A provisional arrangement has been entered 
into between the Panama Government and the 
Canal Commission, whereby the latter, as of 
September 1, has again taken over the work of 
street cleaning, garbage collecting, and street 
sprinkling in the city of Panama. \t the out- 
set, and up to 1908, this work was performed 
gratuitously by the Canal Commission. The 



Panama Government then served notice 
that it desired to take charge of the service, 
and the transfer took place on September 1, 
1908. Since that time, the work has been 
handled by the Panama Government, the 
Canal Commisson contributing the sum of^ 
$10,000 annually toward its cost. Under the 
new arrangement, the Canal Commission will 
have complete jurisdiction over the work, 
and it will continue from year to year, unless 
60 days' notice is given by either party, pre- 
vious to the termination of the contract year, 
of desire for cancellation. The agreement also 
stipulates that Panamanian citizens be given 
preference in the matter of employment. 

♦ 

Mess Hall at Ancon for Gold Emplo.ves. 
A mess hall has been authorized at Ancon 
for gold employes, and the hotel building 
at Pedro Miguel will be used for the purpose. 
It was the original intention to reerect the 
Pedro Miguel hotel as an anne.\ to the mess 
hall at East Balboa, but this arrangement will 
not now be necessar>', inasmuch as eating ac- 
commodations for bachelor employes at 
Ancon will relieve the congestion at the East 
Balboa hotel. The probability that a number 
of bachelors will continue to be quartered at 
Ancon, even after the completion of the Canal, 
was also taken into consideration. The new 
Ancon mess hall will have table accommoda- 
tions for about 100 people at a sitting, and is 
to be situated on the road to Bishop's Hollow, 
near the new quarters recently erected in that 
locality. The hotel privileges will be extended 
to gold emploj'es and their families only, and 
nonemployes will not be served even at the 
50-cent rate. 



MIRAFLORES TO THE SEA. 



Fill of Marshy Area Near Panama. 

The low. swampy area lying between the 
Curundu River on the north, and that part of 
the Calidonia district of the city of Panama, 
known as San Miguel, on the south, will be 
filled in by the Canal Commission. This 
section has made an excellent breeding place 
for mosquitoes in the rainy season, and con- 
stitutes a menace to the health of the people 
living in the vicinity, besides causing con- 
tinual expense in oiling. The owners of the 
property, with one exception, have agreed 
to the proposal, as it will enhance the value 
of their holdings, and be of no e.xpense to 
them. The new sanitary rules and regulations 
placed in effect by the Panama Government, 
and published in the Cacela Oficial of March 
27, 1913, provide: 

Section 92. All premises must be kept in such 
rendition as to prevent mosquito breeding, and 
upon failure of the owner, agent, or occupant of 
such premises to correct the insanitan- conditions 
therein after notice from the health officer, or his 
representative, he shall be fined, and the health 
officer may proceed to correct such condition, 
the cost of same to be a charge against the deiin- 
nuent person to be collected by execution against 
his property. 

It is proposed to make the fill hydraulically. 
using material dredged from the terminal 
basin at Balboa. 



Last Barrier at Pacific End of Canal Destroyed 
on Sunday, August 31. 

The last remaining barrier at the Pacific 
end of the Canal was dynamited at 9.30 
o'clock on Sunday morning, August 31. This 
dike, composed of a trestle fill of rock and 
earth, prevented the water from the sealevel 
channel from entering the steamshovel cut 
5,000 feet long, 500 feet wide, and 46 feet 
below mean tide, extending to Miraflores 
Locks. The Rio Grande Diversion was turned 
into this pit on August 23, but the depth 
of water had only reached about 15 feet by 
Sunday. About 37,000 pounds of 45 and 60 
per cent dynamite were used, the charge being 
placed in 541 holes at an average depth of 30 
feet. A large crowd of spectators was present, 
and pictures of the blast were taken by 
numerous kodaks, and one moving picture 
machine. 

At the time of the explosion the water in 
the channel, south of the barrier, was nearly 
at low tide. The dynamite tore a gap in the 
dike about 100 feet wide, but as the bottom of 
the gap was still at some height above the 
existing tide level, no water passed through. 
An 18-foot tide was predicted for Sunday, 
with its maximum at 3.12 p. m., so that before 
high tide water was expected to flow over the 
gap in the dike. This expectation was fulfilled 
a little earlier than was anticipated, for, at 
1.35 p. m., the water in the sealevel channel 
was nearly even with the top of the gap. At 
this moment a man with a shovel made a 
small trench across the dike through which a 
small stream of water began to flow. This 
rapidly increased in size until 40 minutes 
later, an opening 30 feet wide had been made, 
through which a torrent of water poured in a 
30 or 35-foot fall. The rush of water ate away 
the sides of the opening steadily, carrying 
large sections of the dike, including trestle 
bents, and other debris, into the pit. The 
increasing volume of water filled the pit 
rapidly, and at 3 o'clock, one hour and 25 
minutes after the water first began to flow 
over, the level in the inside channel was that 
of the outside channel, while the gap had been 
widened to 400 feet, or more. Some of the 
Si.xth Division floating equipment was an- 
chored in the sealevel channel just above the, 
break of the barrier, and when the suction 
of the current was at its greatest, a barge was 
cut loose, and was carried through the gap 
with sufiicient force to part a heavy steel cable 
which had been left strung across it. The 
barge then drifted slowly up toward the locks. 

The dredge Marmot has begun excavating 
against the south side of the dike, and another 
dredge will pass through the gap and be set 
at work on the other side within a few days. 
It is expected that enough of the barrier will 
have been removed by October 1 to permit 
large ships to traverse the Pacific end of the 
Canal, a distance of 8 J miles, up to Miraflores 



10 



THE CANAL RECORD 



Vol. VII, No Z. 



Locks. The launch Birdena made the trip 
from the dike to the locks on Tuesday after- 
noon, September 2, the first vessel to pass 
through this section of the Canal under its 
own steam. 



Concrete Work in Locks and Spillways. 

Concrete work in the Canal locks is nearly 
completed, the aggregate amount in place 
at the close of work on August 30, being 
4,478,642 cubic yards. 

A statement of the concrete laid in the 

three sets of locks for the Canal, and in 

Gatun and Miraflores spillways, as ol August 

30, follows : 

Gatun Locks. 
The last concrete for the locks proper, as distinguished 
from that necessary to finishing worii by the First 
Division, was mixed and placed on August 16. 1913. 
At the close of worlc on that day the total amount of 
concrete placed by the Atlantic Division amounted to 
2,045,435 cubic yards. 

PEDRO MIGUEL LOCK. 

Concrete laid. 
Cubic yards. 

Aug. 24 27 

Aug. 2S 34 

Aug. 26 48 

Aug. 27 49 

Aug. 28 32 

Aug. 29 29 

Aug. 30 26 

ToUl 245 

Previously reported 92 ' .263 

Grand toal 923.508 

MIRAFLORES LOCKS. 

Aug. 24 76 

Aug. 25 64 

Aug. 26 104 

Aug. 27 106 

Aug. 28 87 

Aug. 29 89 

Aug. 30 75 

Total 601 

Previously reported. 1,500,048 

Grand total 1,509,649 

GATtra SPILLWAY.* 

Aug. 25 144 

Aug. 26 162 

Aug. 27 14 4 

Aug. 28 V6 

Aug. 29 184 

Aug. 30 184 

Total 954 

Previously reported 233,200 

Grand total 234.154 

MIRAFLORBS SPILLWAY. 

Aug. 25 100 

Aug. 26 36 

Aug 27 10 

Aug. 28 12 

Aug. 29 

Aug. 30 6 

ToUl 164 

Previously reported 75,446 

Grand total 75,610 

♦Includes hydroelectric station. 



able, including rail in condition for reuse, 
and bent rail, which can be straightened; 
and unserviceable, which will be "scrapped." 
The big tree, formerly standing near the 
bank of the Chagres River at Gorgona, in the 
vicinity of the old shops saw mill, has been 
destroyed by dynamite, in order that it might 



not prove an obstruction to future navigation. 

An additional pump and motor will be 
installed at the Gold Hill sluicing plant. 

The pay of the dock laborers at Balboa, 
Colon, and Cristobal has been increased one 
cent an hour, making their present pay 12 
cents an hour. 



LABOR FORCE AND QUARTERS IN JULY. 



The force report for July 30 shows the actual working force of the Canal Commission to 
be 33,830; of the Panama railroad, 5,276, and of the contractors, 3,378, a total effective 
working force of 42,484 men, an increase of 222, as compared with the statement for June. 
The go!d lorce on the Canal work, composed almost exclusively ot while Americans, was 4,173, 
a reduction of 109, as compared with the previous month. A statement of the Canal force 
by divisions, follows; 





SILVER EMPLOYES* 


> 

'm 

(2 


s 

o 




Department or 


Artisans. 


European 
laborers. 


West Indiar 
laborers 


i 


Division. 


c 
o 


2 

c 

c 


2 

c 

a 
o 

11 


t 


i 

u 

O 


2 

c 

S 

.2 


2 
S 

o 


u 


c 

s 

o 


s 


s 

- 


3 

B 

s 

O 


c 
o 


Construction & 
Engineering 


4,638 
131 
651 
886 
715 
6 

4 


12 


362 


1,506 


3986 


2.680 


505 


555 


636 


6.051 


3,S44 


240 


24.726 

131 

1.040 

3.C15 

735 

6 

4 


3,225 

2S6 

318 

193 

48 

18 

85 


27,951 








3 

168 

2 


3 
29S 

i 


5 

390 

1 










8 

279 


368 
959 


t2 
21 
16 


1.353 

3,208 

783 




14 
































Examination of 
























































Total 


7.031 
6,9J9 


12 
:o 


11 

1 1 


535 


1,808 


4.382 


2. 69 J 


505 


555 


6i6 


6,33t 


4.871 


t279 


29,657 


4J73 


33.830 


Month previous 


1 .6511 


4.139 


3.358 


768 


107 


394 


5.92.) 


4.655't24.'( 


28,031 


4.282 


33.213 



I. C. C. force, 33.S30; Panama railroad force, 3.894; Panama railroad commissary force. 1,382; total 39,106. 
♦All wages specified are in gold, flncludes two at five cents, t Includes Uirce at five cents. 

The force report of the Department of Constructitjn and En;::ineering» including the em- 
ployes of contractors, as of July 30, was. as follows; 





SILVER EMPLOYES* 


CJ 

3 
(2 


Total gold. 






Artisans. 


European 
laborers. 


West Indian 
laborers. 


^ 


Division. 


>, 

3 

a 
o 


2 

c 

t 

2 
10 


c: 


a 

0) 

u 

lO 

PJ 

.'40 
56 
52 
14 




1 


2 

c 

a; 
o 


c 
o 
u 


2 

c 

o 

o 




2 

c 

s 


2 
o 


z 


o 

c 
S 
O 


Chief Engineer. 
Mechanical Div. 
Atlantic Div. . . 
Central Division 
U. S. Steel Prod- 


2.795 
251 
555 

1,03/ 


969 
130 
303 
104 


2,691 
420 
547 
32S 


854 

44 

457 

1.325 


195 

1 

140 

169 


489 
66 


231 
105 


3.965 

1.00- 

494 

584 


1.271 

82 

237 

1,954 


1C7 
14 
IS 

101 


13.810 
2.025 
2.S0-1 
6.08: 

155 

16 

2.65S 

24.726 


1.555 
SOS 
263 
599 

190 

4 

355 

.'.225 


15.365 
2,833 
3.067 
6.686 

345 


Chicago House 

Wrecking Co 
McClintic-Mar- 




























20 




























3,013 






12 
10 


- 




















240 




Total 


4.63S 
4.469 


36 2 
391 


1.506 


3,986 


2.680 


505 


555 


636 


6.051 


3.544 


27.951 


Month previous 


1.343 


3,855 


3.315 


767 


106 


394 


5.766 


3.4 24! 23 1 


24.084 


3.224 


27.30 



Ancon Crusher. 

The following is a statement of rock 
crushed at Ancon quarry during the two 
weeks ending August 16: 



*A1I wages specified are in gold, tlndades two at five cents, tlndudes one at five cents. 

QUARTERS. 

A report of Commission quarters occupied on July 31, follows: 



August 4. 
August 5. 
August 6. 
August 7. 
August 8. 
August 9. 

Total. . 
August 1 1 
August ! 2 
August 13 
AuEU?t 14 
August 15 
August 16 

Total . . 



2.205 
1.672 
2.219 
1.589 
2.116 
2.537 



12.338 



Hours 
worked. 



6 00 
7.05 
6.50 
6.40 
7.40 
6.55 



2.954 


3.073 


2,748 


2.207 


2.784 


1.743 


15.509 



41.10 
8.15 
9.55 

11.00 
7.30 
9.30 
6.50 

53.00 



The Fifth and Central Divisions are be- 
ginning to turn in old rail in large quantities. 
This rail will be sorted in two classes, service- 



Place. 


Gold. 


Europeans. 


West Indians. 




Men 


Women 


Chil- 
dren 


Men 


Women 


Chil- 
dren 


Men 


Women 


Chtl- 

dren 


R ilhoa 


354 
516 
789 
16 
325 
221 
365 
724 
196 
108 
195 
657 
781 
S3 
73 


36 

301 

172 

1 

71 

89 

149 

289 

105 

S3 

11 

205 

282 

12 

30 


44 

233 

151 

1 

90 
100 
156 
277 
142 

.54 

4 

212 

319 

17 

28 


409 
6 

458 
358" 
273 
123 
475 
396 
20 
126 






711 
1,072 
579' 
294" 
237 
238 
401 
533 
234 
167 
185 
6M 
1.345 
305 
260 












5 

10 

8 

34 

102 

103 

147 

152 

45 

8 

20 

225 




<^ t 






6 




5 

3 

3 

SO 

46 

12 

10 




11 
2 
12 
95 
■76 
33 
23 


10 




47 




148 


Culebra 


168 




232 




177 




57 




18 




1.011 
80 
92 

127' 


20 


24 


12 




364 










Porto Bello 






2 


4 










Total 


5.373 


1,806 


1.828 


3,954 


149 


276 


7.235 


861 


1.243 



(1) Includes Sabanas Police station. Taboga Island, Culebra Island. Palo Seco and Naos Island. (2) Includes 
71 Panamanians. (3) Includes nine East Indians. (4) Includes 61 Panamanians. (5) Includes Matachin. (6) In- 
cludes Colon Hospital. (7) Includes 23 Asiatics. Gold force of tontractors (included above). 29 families, and 5&S 
bachelors. 



September 3, 1913. 



THE CANAL RECORD 



11 



JOINT LAND COMMISSION. 



Additional Awards. 
The following additional awards were an- 
nounced by the Joint Land Commission at a 
public session held on Monday, August 25: 

Auard No. 23 — In the matter nf sundry claim.'; — An 
award is hereby made against the United States in 
favor of the persons hereinafter named, in the sum of 
$1,455. 

This award shall be paid to the respective claimants 
hereinafter named, in the amounts hereinafter specihed, 
on or before the 24th day of September, l')\6. and if 
payment ur tender of payment of any of the items 
of tliis award is not made on or before tliat date, such 
items shall thereafter bear interest at the rate of six 
per centum, per annum, until paid. 

Jose. A. Alvarez, for all riglits, claims, and other in- 
terests in growing crops, fruit trees, house tax No. 
1846. and any other buildings and any other improve:- 
ments which the said Alvarez may possess on the lanoj 
of Caimito (the said property being distinct from that 
indicated as 48 on the sketch map of tlie Lake Gatun 
and for which a payment was made in Ma> . 1912, by 
Voucher 201S5 to Jose Manual Alvarez), the sum of 
$J5. 

Albert Bnlson, for all rights, claims, and other in- 
terests in growing crops, fruit trees, buildings. ai;d any 
other improvements which tl^e said Albert Batson may 
possess on the lands of BaLamonos Sur, the sum of 
$100. 

Isabella Berry, for all rights, claims, and other in- 
terests in growing crops, fruit trees, buildings, and any 
other improvements which the said Isabella Berry 
may possess in lands located on the estate of Juan 
Grande (said property being distinct from that for 
which an award was made by the joint Land Commis- 
sion in the town of GorgonaJ. the sum of 540. 

Albert Boulon, for all rights, claims, and other in- 
terests in growing crops, fruit trees, buildings, and any 
other improvements which the said Boulon may have 
possessed on or near the Carabali watershed on the 
lands of Juan Grande (the said property being distinct 
from that claimed by Boulon in the town of Corgona) 
the sum of S45. 

William Bycroft, for all rights, claims, and other in 
terests in growing crops, fruit trees, house tax No. 
106S, and any other improvements which the said 
Bycroft may possess on the lands of Caimito Mulato. 
the sum of S'5. 

Estate of Teresa Canoles, for all rights, claims, and 
other interests in growing crops, fruit trees, buildings, 
and any otlier improvements which the said Teresa 
Canoles may have possessed on the lands of TaberniUa, 
the sum of $175. 

Diego Castillo, for all rights, claims, and other in- 
terests in growing crops, fruit trees, buildings and any 
other improvements which the said Castillo may pos- 
sess or may have possessed on the lands of Penas 
Blancas Abajo, the sum of S150. 

Maximiliayio Gomez, for all rights, claims, and other 
interests in growing crops, fruit trees, buildings, and 
any other improvements which the said Gomez may 
possess or may have possessed on lands located on the 
Curutu River, or near the headwaters of the Bailamonos 
River, or on the CarabaU watershed, the sum of $115. 
Cuslodio Herazo, for ail rights, claims and other in- 
terests in growing crops, fruit trees, buildings, and any 
other improvements which the said Herazo may possess 
in lands located above the S7-foot level on the lands cf 
Cano Quebrado (said property being distinct from ti.at 
below the 87-foot level, purchased from the father of 
the claimant, Sebastian Herazo or ErazoJ, the sum of 
$225. 

Eugenia de Leon, for all rights, claims, and other in- 
terests in growing crops, fruit trees, buildings, and any 
other improvements which the said de Leon may have 
possessed in the lands of Barbacoas or Caimito Mulato 
at the time he was notihed to leave the same, less the 
value of annual crops which he has been given an op_ 
portunity to gather, the sum of $23. 

Rosa Morales, for all rights, claims, and other in- 
terests in growing crops, fruit trees, buildings, and any 
other improvements which the said Rosa Morales may 
possess in the lands of Caimito Mulato. the sum of S50. 
Geronimo Ortesa, for all rights, claims, and other in- 
terests in growing crops, fruit trees, house tax No. 
1837, and any other buildings and any other improve- 
ments which the said Ortega may possess in property 
located east of the Panama railroad on the lands of 
Caimito Mulato, the sum of SI20. 

A7idre Phillippe (b:nown also as Henry Phillips and 
Andres Felipe) , for all rights, claims, and other in- 
terests in growing crops, fruit trees, buildings, and any 
other improvements which the said Phillippe may pos- 
sess or may have possessed in the localities known as 
Valdo Ospino and Mujeres Nuevas. the sum of $100. 
Robert Smith, for all rights, claims, and other in- 
ceresta in growing crops, fruit trees, buildings, and any 



other improvements which the said Smith may possess 
on the lands of Caimito Mulato. the sum of $50. 

Manuel Tunon, for all rights, claims, and other in- 
terests in growing crops, fruit trees, buildings, and 
any other improvements which the said Tunon may 
possess or may have possessed in lands lying above the 
87-foot level on the lands of Cafio Quebrado (the said 
property being distinct from the property which was 
purchased from Tunon by the payment in February, 
1912, by Voucher 18842, for improvements below the 
S7-foot level), t le sum of S75. 

Jacob Turner, for all rights, claims, and other in- 
terests in growing crops, fruit trees, buildings, and any 
other improvements which the said Turner may possess 
on lands located east of the Panama railroad on the 
lands of Caimito Mulato (the said property being dis- . 
tinct from the property which was purchased from said 
Turner by the payment in February, 1912, by voucher 
1S65J, for House 1064 at Caimito, and improvements), 
the sum oi $75. Total, SI. 455. 

Award No. 24 — In the mailer of certain claims for 
hr^uses in the town ofGorgona — The evidence before the 
Commission shows that the persons hereinafter named 
were the owners of the properties hereinafter referred to 
before they accepted any leases from the Isthmian 
Canal Commission. In no case did the persons horein- 
:ifter named make any claim to the ownership of the 
land. 

In conformity with the principles formulated in the 
opinion of July 25, 191 i. on the demurrer of Counsel of 
the United States to the jurisdiction of the Commission 
in the matter of the claim of Juan Sotillo, and in ac- 
cordance with the evidence submitted to the Commis- 
sion, an award is hereby made against the United 
States of America for certain buildings hereinafter 
identified by the respective tax numbers, the said 
award to include all rights, claims, and interests of any 
persons in the said buildings, together with all claims 
idi improvements of whatsoever nature on the part c£ 
any persons hereinafter named, and all rights claimed 
by them, in the sum of $700. 

This award shall be paid to the respective persons 
named hereinafter, in the amounts hereinafter specified; 
on or before the 2-lth day of September, 1913, and if 
payment or tender of payment of any of the items 
of this award is not made on or before that date, such 
items shall thereafter bear interest at the rate of six 
per centum, per annum, until paid. 

To the owners of buildings, for the settlement of all 
rights, claims, or other interests which they may have 
in the same, together with any other improvements lo- 
cated on the lots with houses designated by their tax 
numbers, as follows: Felix Armien, tax No. 779, $300; 
Joseph Minier, tax No. 773. $400. Grand total, $7uO. 

Award No. 25 — In the matter of certain claims for 
houses in the town of Gorgona — The evidence before the 
Commission shows that the persons hereinafter named 
became the owners of the properties hereinafter referred 
to, before November 15, 1907, and before they had 
accepted any leases from the Isthmian Canal Commis- 
sion. In no case did the persons hereinafter named 
make any claim to the ownership of the land. 

In conformity with the principles formulated in the 
opinion of July 25, 1913, on the demurrer of Counsel of 
the United States to the jurisdiction of the Commission 
in the matter of the claim of Juan Sotillo. and the 
further opinion of August 20. 1915, concerning the 
date upon which the new system of leases entered into 
effect, and in accordance w-ith the evidence submitted 
to the Commission, an award is hereby made against 
the United States of America for certain buildings here- 
inafter identified by their respective tax numbers, the 
said award to include all rights, claims, and interests 
of any persons in the said buildings, together with all 
claims for improvements of whatsoever nature on the 
part of any persons hereinafter named, and all rights 
claimed by them in the sum of $1,450. This award shall 
be paid to the respective persons hereinafter named, in 
the amounts hereinafter specified, on or before the 
24th day of September, 1913, and if payment or tender 
of payment of any of the items of this award is not made 
on or before that date, such items shall thereafter bear 
interest at the rate of sLx per centum, per annum, until 
paid. 

To the owners of buildings, for the settlement of all 
rights, claims, or other interests which they may have 
in the same, together with any other improvements 
located on the lots with houses designated by their 
tax numbers, as follows: James Brown, tax No. 807, 
$250; W. H. Carrington, administrator ol the estate 
of George Andrade, deceased, a total o* S925, for indi- 
vidual houses, as follows: Tax No. 734, $700; tax 
No. 822, S225; total $925; Edward Gordon, tax 
No. 809, S275. Grand total. $1,450. 

Award No. 26 — In the matttr of certain claims for 
houses in the tou.>n of Go/ gov a — The evidence before the 
Commission uhowcd that the persons hereinafter named 
were the owners of the property hereinafter referred 
to before they accepted any leases from the Isthmian 
Canal Commission. In no t.ase did the persons here- 



inafter named make any claim for the ownership of the 
land. 

The evidence shows further that the buildings re- 
ferred to have been partially demolished, and in making 
its award the Commission has taken into consideration 
the impairment in the value of the property caused by 
the partijl demoUtion of the buildings. 

In consideration of the principles formulated in the 
opinion of July 25. on the demurrer of Counsel of the 
United States to the jurisdiction of the Commission 
in the matter of Juan Sotillo, and in accordance with 
the evidence submitted to the Commission, an award 
is hereby made against the United States of America 
for certain buildings hereinafter identified by their 
respective tax numbers, the said award to include all 
right, title, and interest of any persons in the said 
buildings, together with all claims for improvements 
of whatsoever nature on the part of the persons herein- 
after named, and all rights claimed by them, in the sum 
of SI, 245. This award shall be paid to the respective 
claimants, hereinafter named, in the amounts herein- 
after specified , on or before the 2-5th day of September, 
1913, and if payment or tender of payment of any of 
the items of this award is not made on or before that 
date, such items shall thereafter bear interest at the rate 
of six per centum, per annum, until paid. 

To the owners of buildings, for the settlement of aU 
rights, claims, or other interests which they may have 
in the same, together with any other improvements lo- 
cated on the lots with houses designated by their tax 
numbers, as follows: D. VV. Ogilvie, tax No. 826, $625; 
Luis de la Pena. for individual houses, as follows: 
Tax No. 79?. S320; tax No. 832, $300; Total $620. 
Grand total, $1,245. 



To Conrinue Pumping from Chagres River. 

The Division of Municipal Engineering 
will continue in service the duplex steam 
plunger pump, situated on the bank of the 
Chagres River, near Gamboa bridge, in order 
to provide against a possible deficiency in 
the water supply on the west side of the 
Canal during the next dry season, and also 
for steamshovels that may be kept in service 
above the 85-foot level on the east and 
west banks of Culebra Cut. This pump dis- 
charges into a 10-inch water main, which 
crosses the Cut on the Empire suspension 
bridge. As this bridge will be taken down 
before all work is completed on the east bank 
of the Canal, it is proposed to lay the main 
across the bottom of the Cut at a suitable 
point in the vicinity of the present structure. 
In view of the fact that the rise of Gatun 
Lake will flood the present site of the pump, 
it has been moved to a point higher up on 
the bank. 



Sale of Scrap Copper Screening and Brass Borings. 

Award for the sale of all scrap copper screen- 
ing has been made to H. D. Moskowitz of New 
York City for the period beginning July 1, 
1913, and terminating June 30, 1914, at the 
price of $10.78 per hundredweight. The con- 
tract for the last period was held by the 
Nassau Smelting and Refining Works of 
New York City, at §12.15 per hundredweight. 
The prices at which the scrap screening was 
sold by the Canal Commission for the three 
years prior to 1912 have been $8.25, $8.17, 
and $7.75 per hundredweight, respectively. 

Two proposals were received for the pur- 
chase of brass borings, one from the Chicago 
Housewrecking Company, at $9.25 per hun- 
dredweight, and the other from M. Rovetta, 
at $5.75 per hundredweight. Both bids were 
rejected, and it has been decided to hold the 
borings until the market improves. The 
Board of Appraisal has fixed on 10 cents a 
pound, as the upset price for the borings. 



The special material train operated between 
Balboa, Empire, and Gorgona each afternoon 
dropped the latter place from its itinerary 
on Saturday, August 16. The train will con- 
tinue to operate with Empire as its most 
northerly stop. 



12 



THE CANAL RECORD 



Vol VII, Ho, 2, 



COM MISSION CLUBHOUSES. 



Athletic and Aquatic Meet at Corozal. 

Nearly 1,000 spectators and contestants 
attended the athletic and aquatic meet held 
under the auspices of the Corozal Y. M. C A., 
on Labor Day, September 1. 

The selection of Corozal seems to have met 
with favor as 149 entries were received. 
The new athletic field adjoining the club- 
house proved fully adequate for the occasion 
and will doubtless be useful for future events 
of a similar nature. 

The events of the morning were enlivened 
by a concert by the band of the United States 
Marine Corps. 

Interest centered in the aquatic events that 
were held in the afternoon on account of the 
fact that the contests were held in the fore- 
bay of the lower lock at Miraflores, instead of 
near the dike as had been originally intended. 
A concert was given by the Tenth Infantry 
Band at the locks, and later at the clubhouse, 
when the spectators were returning. 

The results follow: 

ATHLETIC EVENTS. 

Event No. 1, 100-yard dash — First, Detmore VVitver. 
second, Frank W. Hofif; third, K. C. Jackson. Time. 
11 1/5 seconds. 

Event No. 2, 60-yard dash for boys—First, Wm. Lou- 
Ian; second. Otis Roe; third, A. M. Bouclie, Jr. Time, 
7 4/5 seconds. 

Evtnt No. 3, Running broad jump — First S. J. Saw- 
yer, distance, 20.7 feet; second, E. T. Baldwin, dis- 
tance, 19.S feet; third, Frank W. Holf, distance. 17.9 
feet. 

Event No. 4, IZO-yard laiv hurdles — First, L. A. Ko- 
perski; second, J. N. Kenealy; third, R. A. Koperski, 
Time, 17.1 seconds. 

Event No. 5, Pole vault — First. J. G. DeCora; second, 
F. C. Purchase; 'third, C. Murray. Height, 9 feet 6 
inches. 

Eveyit No. 6. 220-yard dash — First H. D. Simmons; 
second. A. J. Johnson; third. F. C. Purchase. Time, 
26 seconds. 

Event No. 7, boys' relay — First, Corozal; second, 
Gatun. Time, 48 seconds. 

Event No. 8, 12-pound shot put — First. I. R. Scheel; 
second. Raymond Van Horn; third, A. J. Johnson. 
Distance. 40 feet 3 inches. 

Event No. 9, Running high jump — First R. A. 
Koperski; second, P. H. Chadbourne; third. Irving 
R. Scheel. Height, 5 feet 7 inches. 

Event No. 10,880-yard run— First, P. C. Hulsebosch; 
second, VVm. R. Anderson; third, S. C. Russell. Time. 
2 minutes 19 seconds. 

Event No. 11, 440-yard dash — First. H. D. Simmons; 
second. J. W. Harper; third, H. Laundry. Time 60 3/5 
seconds. 

Event No. 12, Three-legged race — First, Hoff and 
Hulsebosch; second. Frey and Russell. 

Event No. 13, Jug-of-war — Won by Camp Elliott. 

Event No. 14, One mile relay race. (Four laps only) — 
First. Coro/,al; second. Camp Elliott; third, Ancon. 
Time, 3 minutes 2 seconds. 

AQUATIC EA'ENTS. 

Event No. 1, 50-yard swim — First. D. E. Simons; 
second. J. R- Stapler; third. Leon Giavelli. 

Eienl No. 2, 50-yard swim Jor buys — First, Hal Ward- 
low; second, Jolm Sweek; third, Clarence Atkins. 

Eve7U No. 3. WO-yard suim — First D. C. Galloway; 
second. D. E. Simons; third, J. R. Stapler. 

Event No. 4, famy diving — First, J. M. Jimenez; 
second. Waldo A. Reisner; third, Raymond Smith. 

Event No. 5 — Equipment race was called off. 

Event No. 6, Relay suimming race — First, Gatun. 

Event N^t. 7, One-mi,e rote— First, J. W. Greene; 
second, Jas. A. McGrath; third, j. A. Eraser. 

POINTS BV TOWNS. 

The total of points, by towns, follows: 

Position. Town. Points. 

1 Camp Elliott 46 

2 Corozal 36 

3 Cristobal 27 

4 Culebra 23 

5 Gatun 16 

6 Ancon 12 

7 Empire 5 

8 Toro Point 5 

GENERAL. 

The moving picture schedule for the week September 
8 to 13 is. as follows; Monday, Gatun; Tuesday, Cris 
tobal; Wednesday, Culebra; Thursday, Empire; 



Friday. Corozal and Porto Hello. A spe-ial leel. "The 
innuRuration of President Wilson," will be shown as a 
featuie this week. Other reels are enti,,led: "Turpen- 
tine industry"; "No trespassing;" "Father had his 
way;" "Pathe Weekly;" "Saved at the altar;'? 
"Broncho Billy for sher'.ft*;" "From Laatherbrunnen 
to Murren. Switzerland;" "Small game at the Zoo;" 
"An eccentric sportsman;" "Stern papa;" "Love's 
messenger." For next week. September 8 to 13. the 
following reels will be shown: "Hindoo charm;" 
*'Spiing log rolling;" "Harriet Qui ^by's flight;" 
"For her Lord;" "The ■ Pickwick i^redicament;" 
"The Laird's daughter;" "The convalescent;" "The 
little wanderer." 

cin,EBRA. 

Moving pictures will be shown on Saturday evening 
at S o'clock. A special reel showing the inauguration 
of President Wilson will be a feature. 

High scores in tenpins for the week were, as follows: 
Schmeck. 204; Bechlera. 204; Case, 204. 201; Dough- 
euy, 218, 22J. 215, 200; DeCora, 209. 208. 

EMPIRE. 

The Empire basketball team defeated the Corozal 
team on Saturday evening, August 30 by a score of 32 
to 1 1. The Empire men are to form a local league to 
play prior to the opening of the Isthmian League. 
There are enough men interested to form five teams- 

The "American" Isthmian duckpin tournament, 
which resulted in a tie between Empire and Cristobal, 
was rolled off on the Gatun alleys on Saturday evenmg. 
August 30. Empire won the first two games, thereby 
winning the tournament and prizes. The Empire team 
was composed of the following men: Hill (captain), 
Hu;on. Grund. King, Mengcl, and Lowande. 

An A. B. C. class pool tournament has been arranged 
The entries will close on September 6. Those wi'ihiiig 
to enter are requested to see pool room manager. 

GATUN. 

The Tenth Infantry band, under the db-cclio^ of 
Chief Musician Coe. gave a concert at the clubhouse 
on Saturday evening, August 30. 

The "Metropolitan" basketball league was organized 
on Wednesday evening, August 27. Joseph P. Mitchel 
is president and Harry Foman, secretary. The follr.v- 
ing teams and men will participate in die lej^'r.-: 

McClintic — M. Conley. Hess, Randill, Ps.omicbu 'a. 
Rothgeb. First Division — MartinofT, Tuttlt. BradLy, 
Wathen. Sherrard, Gray, Reisner. Lhial'.ackea — Fitz- 
patrick. Thompson. L. Mitchell. Bailey, Bruce. Jensen, 
Cauthers, Giddings, M. Omeara. Chandler. Com- 
missary — Kerruish, Grabb, Hallowell, Lutz. Garrison. 

Atlantic Division — j. Mitchell. F. Huber, Wright. 
Whiston, Roberts, Coleman. 

The first two games scheduled are: September 3, 
Atlantics vs. Unattached; September 4, McClintic- 
Marshall vs. First Division. Gold medals will be given 
as prizes. E. D. Christopherson will act as official 
referee. 

The "Red Hot" indoor baseball league was brought 
to a close on Thursday evening. August 28, with final 
results, as follows: 

Team. Won. Lost. P. C. 

Atlantic Division 6 1 .000 

First Division 5 . . . . 1 833 

Office. McClintic-Marshall.. . 3 3 500 

(Ij Field McClintic-Marshall. 3 3 500 

Transportation 2 4 ZZi 

Commissary 2 .... 4 3ii 

(2) Field McClintic-Marshall. 6 000 

The following is the present standing of the popular 
handicap pool tournament: 

Name. Won. Lost. P.C. 

Duey 3 1.000 

Townsley 3 1.000 

Kerruish 3 1 750 

BaUey 2 1 666 

O'Hara 2 1 606 

Johnson 2 1 666 

Carkeet 2 1 666 

Pettit I 1 555 

Reisner 1 1 555 

Gray I 1 555 

Bradley 1 2 333 

Von 1 2 333 

Dennis 1 3 250 

Hamill 1 000 

Wall 4 000 

The final results of the First Division duckpin tourna- 
ment conducted during the month of August is. as 
follows: 

Team. Won. Lost. P.C. 

Dubbs 16 2 888 

Billikens 14 4 777 

Shuttles 14 4 777 

Transmitters 7 11 388 

Nut splitters 5 1.3 .277 

Boosters 4 14 222 

Chronics 3 15 166 

CRISTOBAL. 

Thirty men attended the opening meeting of the 
discussion club on Tuesday night. August 26. Fol- 



lowing the address by Mr. W. B. Childers, an animated 
discussion was held. 

In the simultaneous chess tournament on Saturday, 
August 30, Mr. William Dubois of Culebra took four 
games and lost five to members of the Cristobal chess 
club. Messrs. Verner, Hurt, Taylor, Ogden. and 
Dubois won from Mr. Dubois, and Messrs. Wilson, 
Wechsler. Salzburg, and Martin lost. The members of 
the chess club favor the proposal to hold an "All- 
Isthmian" chess tournament. 

Mr Frank Reynolds featured a monologue and song 
at the moving picture entertainment Saturday night, 
August 30. Following the entertainment, an informa 
reception was held in honor of Mr. and Mrs. Irving De- 
Long, whose marriage had just been announced. 

An outing was given the children at the Washington 
Hotel swimming pool on Labor Day. 

PORTO BELLO. 

W. B. Childers, superintendent of the McClintic- 
Marshall Construction Company at Gatun. spoke to a 
good sized audience at the Porto Bello Y. M. C. A.. on 
Sunday evening. August 24. His subject was "Natural 
law in the world of labor." 

A handicap pool tournament is being played with the 
following entries and results to date: 

Name. Won. Lost. I', C. 

Murray 3 1.000 

Doyle 1 1.000 

Bucklin 8 1 889 

Heil 5 1 833 

Bowcn 6 2 750 

Smith 2 1 667 

l-iecne 3 2 600 

Cummings 6 .... 4 600 

T. W. Sh.'rrard 1 4 200 

Colberg 3 4 428 

'I homps m 1 . . . . 5 167 

J.D.Sherrard 1 6 143 

Chase 2 000 

Lnglebrecht 7 000 

The interest in gymnasium work is increasing. The 
following are among those enrolled in classes: Messrs. 
Hoehne, Medd, Chase, Jensen, Bradberry, Geyer, 
Bucklin, Sherrard, Claude Smith, and Wm. Smith, 

Handball seems to be the favorite game in the gym- 
nasium, and a local tournament will probably be or- 
ganized in the near future. 

A new supply of gymnasium shoes has been received. 

The Sunday evening song services have an average 
attendance of about 40 people. Mr. Walter Thompson 
has charge of the singing. 

Seven new pianola rolls have been added to the 
collection. 

The "Exiles Dance Club" will have a dance at the 
clubhouse on September 13. The Tenth Infantrj' 
orchesua has been engaged. 



Canal Zone Postal Savings Bank Transactions. 

A statement of the postal savings hank 
transactions at Canal Zone post-offices for 
the month of July, follows: 



Name of Office. 



Ancon 

Balboa 

Bas Obispo 

Corozal 

Cristobal 

Culebra . . , 

Empire 

Gatun 

Gi^rgona 

La> Cascadas 

Maiarhin 

Mirallorea 

Paraisc 

Cristobal. Sta. *'A". 
Cristobal. Sta. "B". 
Pedro Miguel 



Postal savings 

cert ifica tea 

issued. 



$17,212.00 
16,020.00 

9,336. Oa 
3t ^46 DO 
; 1.59 4. 00 

9,7(il.00 
18.372. OU 
15.512.00 

5,245.00 

13.863.00 

201.00 

4,y]6.00 
12,069 00 

2,845.00 

1,019.00 
12,425.00 



Total 

Deposits on hand 

on July 1, 19I,V . . 

Amount deposited 
in July 

Amount withdrawn 
In July 

Balance on band 
August 1. 1913 



$183,936,00 

$645,690 00 

183,936 00 



Pos-.il savingi 

ceriificateif 

p>.i. 



$!.^ I 00 

16.' ■ O't 

■ .t \j 

23 / (,0 

10,:3U.iiU 

12.200,(10 

13.331.00 

19.452.00 

20,120.00 

14.221.00 

7. 178. 00 

7,642.00 

14.193.00 

1,620.00 

1.453.00 

8,161.00 



$192,471.00 



$192,471.00 
637.155.00 



$829,626.00 



$829,626.00 



Married. 

DELONG-ROGERS— At the Union Church, Cris- 
tobal, Miss Esther A. Rogers of Thonotosassa, Fla., 
to Mr. Irvin Newton DeLong of Easton. Pa., the Rev. 
Carl H.Elliottofficiating. Canal Zone residence, Cris- 
tobal. 

McEWEN-ASSY— At the Union Church. Cris- 
tobal, on Monday. September 1, Miss Josephine Louise 
Assy of New York City to Mr. John Alex. McEwen 
of Boston, the Rev. Carl H. Elliott officiating. Canal 
Zone residence, Culebra. 



September 3, 1912. 



THE CANAL RECORD 



13 



SOCIAL LIFE OF THE ZONE. 



Centralization of Cliiirch Work. 

The Woman's Foreign Missionary' Society 
of the Methodist Episcopal Church has issued 
invitations to the members of the church so- 
cieties throughout the Canal Zone for a rally 
to be held in the church parlors of the sea wall 
church on Saturday, September 6, at 2.30 
o'clock. The object of this meeting is to dis- 
cuss the possibility of forming a central society 
for the carrying on of Christian work among 
the women after the disbandment of such 
societies as now exist. It is thought that if 
the women concentrate in one strong organi- 
zation, the work can be done without much 
tax on their time. It is believed that the 
women of Corozal, Paraiso, Pedro Miguel, 
Culebra. and Empire will be interested in the 
project, and it is to residents in those villages 
that the appeal is especially made. In ad- 
dition to the discussion of these plans, there 
will be a short program, which will include 
one number by pupils of the mission school, 
and an address on missions by Mrs. Harrj' 
Compton. For the convenience of those ladies 
who wish to combine a morning business trip 
with the meeting, Mrs. E. M. Keyset of Ancon 
will serve luncheon at her home near the hos- 
pital gate at 12 o'clock. Those having chil- 
dren to be cared for will find special provision 
for their entertainment. Women who wish 
to avail themselves of this hospitality should 
send word of acceptance to Mrs. E. M. Key- 
ser, Ancon. The committee in charge of the 
arrangements for the meeting is composed of 
Mrs. Compton, president of the society, Mrs. 
C. H. Ports, secretary, and Mrs. JamesStokoe, 
chairman of the committee. 

At the meeting of the society on August 2, 
Mrs Ports was elected secretary, vice Miss 
Elise Keyset, resigned. Miss Keyser has left 
the Isthmus for her home in the United 
States. It is possible that she may return in the 
service of the Methodist Missionary Board. 

The Methodist Mission School in Panama 
has an enrollment of 90, and the last report 
showed an average attendance of 83 pupils. 
There are three teachers, and one teacher to 
supervise the children in their play. It has 
been decided to devote one day in each week 
to instruction in industrial work. The boys 
will be taught carpentry and manual work, 
and the girls will be taught sewing, cooking, 
and household economics. The missionary 
society will provide suitable playground equip- 
ment for the school. 

Miscellaneous Notes. 

A large, clear map of the United States is 
desired by the instructor in a class in English 
for Chinamen. Any one wishing to donate 
such a map may address Bo.x 420, Cristobal. 

The Cristobal Union Sunday school has 
forwarded a donation to the Jacob Riis Set- 
tlement for its fund for sending a poor family 
to the country for a few days in the hot weath- 
er. Five dollars will take care of a good sized 
family for one week. Mr. Kromer, super- 
intendent of the Cristobal Union Sunday 
school, Mr. Simka, Cristobal, and Mr. Page, 
secretary of the Commission clubhouse at 
Cristobal, will receive further subscriptions 
for this purpose. 

Mrs. R. C. Warringer of Johannesburg, 
South Africa, was the guest of honor at the 
meeting of the Woman's Altar Guild of St. 
Luke's Church, Ancon, on Tuesday after- 
noon, September 2. She spoke informally on 
the work of the women of the church in the 



Transvaal. The meeting was held at the 
home of Mrs. R. E. Noble, and was well at- 
tended. The guild will celebrate its sixth 
anniversary in October. The ne.xt meeting 
will be held at the home of Mrs. S. T. Darling, 
Ancon Hospital grounds, on Tuesday, Oc- 
tober 7. The hour has been changed from 
3.30 to 4 o'clock. 

Dr. George Chalmers Richmond, D. D., 
rector of Trinity Church, Philadelphia, has 
been a recent visitor to the Isthmus. He 
preached at Christ Church, Colon Beach, on 
Sunday evening, August 24; at St. Luke's 
Hospital chapel, Ancon, on Sunday morning, 
August 31, and at St. Paul's church, Panama, 
on the evening of the same day. Dr. Rich- 
mond sailed for New York on the Trent on 
Tuesday, September 2. 

A special service was held at the Cristobal 
Union Church on Monday evening, Septem- 
ber 1, in commemoration of those who have 
lost their lives in connection with the con- 
struction of the Panama Canal. The pastor, 
Rev. Carl H. Elliott, preached a memorial 
sermon. 



Personal. 

Congressman Wyatt Aiken of South Caro- 
lina, accompanied by his son, arrived on the 
Panama, on Sunday, August 31, to look over 
the. Canal work. 



Visit of Siiriners. 

One hundred and nine members of the 
Ancient Arabic Order, Nobles of the Mystic 
Shrine, arrived on the Turrialba from New 
Orleans on Thursday, August 28, and 81 
on the Cartago on Saturday, August 30. 
The most noteworthy- event of their stay was 
the ceremony of initiation which was held 
in the forenoon of Labor Day in the west 
chamber of the upper lock at Miraflores, where 
the setting was made to represent the interior 
of a Shriners' temple. After the secret work, 
a bronze tablet was placed on the center 
wall, commemorative of the event, which 
bears the following inscription; 
Es Selamu Aleikum 
Osman Temple, A. A. O. N. M. S.,St. Paul. Minnesota 
U.S.A. 
J. Harry Lewis, Illustrious Potentate. 
John l-ishel. Recorder. 
Will O. Washburn, Chief Rabban. 
This tablet marks the oasis where, on "Ailoul Ahaad 
1327," (September rirst Nineteen Hundred and Thir- 
teen) a caravan from Osman Temple paused in its 
journey toward the setting sun and conferred in full 
form tlie Ancient Arabic Order of the Nobles of the 
Mystic Shrine on 17 1 sons of the desert in service under 
the Isthmian Canal Commission. 
May Allah protect and sustain them. 
Aleikum Es Selamu. 

The trip was made under the auspices of 
Osman. Temple of St. Paul, Minn, and its 
band and patrol was brought along. The 
social features of the visit consisted of a 
ball at the Hotel Tivoli on Saturday evening, 
band concerts in Panama and Colon, sight- 
seeing trips, and a banquet at the Hotel 
Washington on Monday evening. Mr. W. W. 
Irwin, Imperial Potentate of the Order, and 
Mr. J. Harry Lewis, potentate of Osman 
Temple, were among the visitors. 



Examination by Board of Local Inspectors. 

The Board of Local Inspectors will conduct 
e.xaminations at the Administration Building, 
Ancon, on Wednesday, September 10, 1913, 
beginning promptly at 2 p. m., for persons 
desiring to procure the following classes of 
licenses; Pilots, masters, mates, marine en- 
gineers, chauffeurs, and navigators of motor 



boats. All applicants for licenses must pro- 
cure from the Executive Office, Ancon, forms 
of application and information respecting the 
filling out of same, at least one day before the 
examination. Applicants for chauffeurs' li- 
censes must also bring automobiles. 

♦ 

Tivoli Club Election. 

The annual meeting of the Tivoli Club was 
held on Sunday, August 31, when the follow- 
ing officers were elected; President, Col. 
William C. Gorgas; vice-president. Dr. W. 
E. Decks; secretary-treasurer, J. W. Tanne- 
hill, reelected. Messrs. B. C. Poole and W. K. 
Jackson were elected members of the execu- 
tive committee. 



. Cristobal Marine Association. 

The Cristobal Marine Association meets 
every first and third Sunday of each month 
in Cristobal lodge hall, building No. 1. The 
next meeting ttill be September 7, at 8 p. m. 
L. Pettoletti, 
Recording Secretary. 
Cristobal, C. Z., August 27, 1913. 

♦ 

The dismantling of chamber cranes Nos. 
2 and 4, and berm cranes E and F at 
Miraflores Locks will be done by forces of the 
Fifth Division. 



Family Quarters. 

Applications for married quarters on file on July 31, 
were, as follows: 



District. 


List 
No. 1. 


List 
No. 2. 




18 

1 
1 


(8) 


97 (19) 




Balboa 


57 (3) 
12 (2) 
129 (5) 
150 (8) 
35 (4) 
88 (U) 


Bas Obispo 


Corozal 




Cristobal 




Culebra 


4 

5 


(4) 




Gatun 


Las Cascadas i 


25 (6) 
60 (6) 
14 (9) 
4 




1 

1 (1) 


Porto Bello 


Toro Point 








Total 


31 


(13) 


758 (73) 



Note — The figures m parentheses show the number 
of applicants ah-eady occupying regular or nonhouse- 
keepmg family quarters at stations other than those at 
which applications are filed. 



Tide Table. 

The following table shows the time of high and low 
tides at Panamafor the week ending September i3, 1913; 



Date. 


High 


Low 


High 


Low 


High 


Sept. 7 


A.M. 


A.M. 
2.C5 
3 02 


A.M. 
8.08 
9.05 
10.16 
11,43 
P.M. 
1.05 
2 07 
2.55 


P.M. 
2.37 
3. 38 
4.52 
6.08 

7.17 
8.12 
8.57 


P.M. 
8.44 
9. SO 

11.18 


Sept. 8 




Sept. 9 




4.10 
5.30 

6.48 
7.51 
8.40 


Sept. 10 




Sept. 11 

Sept. 12 

Sept. 13 


12.45 
1.50 
2.38 


....#. 


75th meridian t 


ime. 











Stages of the Ctiagres. 

Ma.ximum height of the Chagres River for the week 
ending midnight, Saturday. August 30, 1913. All 
heights are in feet above mean sealevel. 





Stations. 


Day and Date. 


Vigia. 


i3 
'rt 
< 


i 

C 


62 


Sun.. August 24 

Mon.. .\usust 25 

Tues.. .August 26 

Wed.. .August 27 

Tliurs.. .August 28 

Fri.. .August 29 

Sat.. August 30 


128.7 
127.5 
126.7 
131.4 
127.4 
127.3 
126.8 


94.4 
93.7 
93.1 
96.4 
93.8 
93.5 
93.2 


59.4 
59.5 
59.7 
60.0 
60.1 
60.2 
60.3 


59.4 
59.5 
59.6 
59.8 
60.1 
60.2 
60.3 


Height of low water to 
nearest foot 


125.0 


1 
91.0 44.0 





•Sluice gates in spillway ol Ga£un Dam were iJosed 
on June 27, 1913, with lake at elevation 48.25. 



14 



THE CANAL RECORD 



Vol. VII, No, 2, 



OFFICIAL CIRCULARS. 



Red Cross Ball. 
CULEBSA. C. Z-, August 28. 1913. 

MBAD3 OF DEPARTMENTS AND DIVISIONS: 

A ball will be given a; the Hotel Tivoli on September 
17, under the auspices of the National Red Cross Society 
for the benefit of the Canal Zone Chapter, in celebra- 
tion of the completion of dry excavation in the Canal. 
The ball has received official sanction and payments 
of amounts subscribed by employes for tickets or other 
purposes in connection with the ball may be made by 
pay roll deduction, if the employe so requests in writing. 
Geo. W. Goethals. 
Chairman, isthmian Canal Commission. 
President, Panama Railroad Company. 

Analysis of Water Supply. 

CuLEBRA. C. Z.. August 26. 1913. 
Circular No. 444-a: 

Parpgraph D under Section 3 of the "Rules and 
regulations regarding the examination, treatment, and 
care of water supplies under the jurisdiction of the 
Isthmian Canal Commission and Panama Railroad 
Company from a sanitary standpoint" Is changed to 
read, as follows: 

The methods of analysis are to be those of_the 
American Public Health Association. 

Geo. W. Goethals, 
Chairman. Isthmian Canal Commission. 
Prestdi7il, Panama Railroad Company. 



Standard Oils and Lubricants. 

CuLEBRA. C. Z., September 1, 1913. 
Circular No. 314-k. (Superseding Circular No. 
314-1) 

The following list of illuminating oils, and lubricating 
oils and greases will be considered as standard for the 
Isthmian Canal Commission and Panama Railroad 
Company, and will be used only for the purposes indi- 
cated, excepting only as indicated in the last paragraph 
of this order. AH requisitions on the Quartermaster's 
Department shall specify the oil or lubricant desired, 
either by the I. C. C. number given below or by name, 
or by^oth. and no name other than that given below 
for each particular oil or lubricant shall be used in 
designating the same on requisitions, etc. No oils or 
lubricants will be requisitioned for unless the same are 
included in the following list, until after application for 
authority to procure same, showing the necessity 
therefor, has been first submitted to. and approved by 
me. 

The metal drums in which most of the lubricating 
oils are furnished is the property of the oil contractors 
and have to be returned to them in good condition. 
Care should, therefore, be exercised in their handling to 
prevent both damage and loss of oil. and in no case 
should they be used as a continuous container for same 
or any other oils, but when empty should be returned 
promptly to the Quartermaster's Department. 

The prices given below indicate the actual cost to the 
Commission and Panama Railroad Company of all 
oils, and lubricants, delivered at Cristobal, under the 
present annual contract (cost of drums not included), 
and are not intended to supersede the prices given in the 
price book of the Quartermaster's Department, and 
should not be used in the material accounts. 

Cost per gal. 
I. C. C. No. Drums. Cans. 

1. Valve oil $.25 

For the internal lubrication of steam 

valves and cylinders on all classes of 
equipment. For use on the crank case of 
Westinghouse vertical compound en- 
gines. 

2. Air compressor cylinder oil 20 

, For the internal lubrication of air cy- 
linders of air compressors, and for pneu- 
matic hammers and drills. 

3. Marine engine oil 22 

For marine engines, but not in crank 

cases, where it would be agitated and 
mixed with water, for, being a compound 
oil. it would emulsify if so used; also, for 
the block bearings of suction dredges. 

4. Stationary engine oil 17 

For stationary engines, electric dyna- 
mos, and motors, wood and metal work- 
ing machinery, and for the general lubri- 
cation of machinery, also, for dies of bolt 

cutters, turret lathes, etc.. except where 
the use of lard oil is permitted. (See note 
under lubricant No. II). 

5. Locomotive engine oil IS 

For all locomotives, running gear of all 

locomotive cranes, deck machinery of 
dredges (except engines) and for cold saws 
In machine shops. 

6. Turbine engine oil 18 

For all step bearings of turbines In the 

MLraflores and Gatun power plants only. 



Thii oil is aluo known as step bearing oil. 

7. Gas engine oil 20 

For the cylinders of internal combus- 
tion engineg. 

9. Car oil 13 

For the journals of all cars, passenger 
coaches, locomotive tenders, and rolling 
stock generally; for steam shovel bearings 
where not equipped with grease cups, 
and for tripod drills and switches. 

10. Transformer oil ■. . . . .28 

For use in the electrical subdivision in 

air-cooled transformers only. 

11. Lard oil 6575 

For hand torches for illuminating pur- 
poses only on marine equipment. On 

land, for shop use on pipe-threading ma- 
chines; and it may be substituted for 
stationary engine oil (I. C. C. No. 4) 
when necessary, on dies and turret ma- 
chines and on bolt cutters, when working 
refined iron or tough machinery steel. 
The use of this oil should be minimized 
to the greatest possible extent on account 
of its high cost. 

12. Ammonia cylinder oil 35 

For the internal lubrication of cylinders 

of ammonia compressors only. 

In bbls. 

13. Crude oil 0262 

For the lubrication of steamshovel 

chains, cables where designated, and gen- 
eral purposes where oils and greases have 
been used as a preservative. 

LUBRICATING GREASES. 

Cost per Lb. 
In bbls 

20. Nonliquid oil 045 

This is an oil of the consistency of vase- 
line, for the lubrication of sheaves of car- 
riages on the Lidgerwood cableways at 

Gatun, for air brake cylinders and triple 
valves, and such pneumatic drills and 
motors as may be equipped for the use of 
grease. 

Cost per Lb. 
In Cans 

21. Cup grease (yellow) 065 

For all classes of lubrication where 

grease is used in compression cups. This 
grease is being received in two consist- 
encies, No. 3 and No. 5, the No. 3 of les- 
ser consistency to be used on machinery 
subject to normal temperature, and the 
No. 5 of heavier consistency to be used on 
machinery subject to higher tempera- 
tures. 

22. Gear grease 027 

For all classes of lubrication requiring 

grease for which compression cups are not 
adapted. This includes the center and 
side bearings of cars, cranes, and steam- 
shovels, also wire cables, both standing 
and running, etc. 

Cost per Lb. 
In bbls 

23. Cable grease 04 

For the "Interlocked-wire" track cables 

of the Gatun cableways exclusively. 

24. Crank pin grease 085 

For use on locomotive crank pins only 

where pressure cups are used. Care 
should be exercised not to confound this 
grease with cup grease Nos. 3 and 5 (I. 
C. C. No. 21, which is not suitable for this 
purpose) . 

ILLUMINATING OILS. 

Cost per Gal. 
Drums Cans. 

30. Signal oil 44 

For use in railroad lanterns only, and in 
the cab lights of engines. 

31. Kerosene oil 102 .169 

For use in locomotive headlights, pas- 
senger coach, and similar lamps, ordinary 
lanterns, and for cleaning purposes. 

GASOLINE. 

40. GasoHne 254 .318 

For use on gasoline launches, motor 
cars, blow torches, cleaning, etc. 

Standard hand oilers and oil cans should be used as 
provided in Circular No. 33S-D, 

A ::opy of this circular shall be posted in all stationary 
plants, shops, engine houses, storehouses, oil houses, 
on all marine equipment, and in such other places as 
may be necessary to insure the cognizance of same by 
all coucerned. 

Substitutions of cheaper grades of the standard 
I. C. C. and P. R. R. lubricants given above, may be 
approved by the traveling engineer, or the inspector 
of lubricants and equipment, whenever practicable. 



the above circular defm^lng In a general way tk^ 
iiccepted uies. 

Geo. W. Goethals, 

Chairman, Isthmian Canal Commission. 

Presidtnt, Panama Pailroad Company. 



Quartermaster's Departmeot to Take over Oil 
Houses. 

CuLEBRA. C. Z.. August 23, 1913. 
Hfads of Departments and Divisions: 

Effective September 1, 1913, the Quartermaster's 
Department will take over all field oil houses of the 
Commission on the Isthmus. The necessary arrange- 
ments for the issuance of lubricants and greases will be 
made directly by the Quartermaster's Department with 
the various departments and divisions interested. 
Geo. VV. Goethals, 
Chairman and Chief Engineer. 



Tracks Over Gamboa Dike To Be Cut Septem- 
ber 10, 191j. 
Empire. C. Z., September 3. 1913. 
Central Division Circular No. 377: 

The tracks over Gamboa dike will be cut on Sep- 
tember 10. 1913. On and after that date, all trains cross- 
ing the Canal will have to use Bridge 57 J. 

A. S. ZlNN, 

Acljns Division Engineer. 



Chief Accountant, Central DivLsion. 

Empire, C. Z.. August 21, 1913. 
Central Drvisiox Circular No. 374. 

Effective this date, Mr. J. J. Melgord is appointed 
chief accountant. Central Division, vice Mr. R. K. 
Booth, resigned. A. S. ZiNN. 

Acting Division Engineer. 



Chanfie in Sailing Dales of P. R. R. Steamers. 

Panama Railroad Company. 
Office of General Superintendent. 

Colon, R. P., August 2&, 1913. 
Circular No. 187: 

All Concerned — On account of withdrawing the 
gLeamship AUiama from the service for necessary 
repairs, and inability to charter suitable steamer to take 
its place, the following changes will be made in our 
steamship schedule: 



Steamers. 


"Leave Arrive 
New York Cristobal 


T^ave 
Cristobal 


Arrive 
New York 








Aug. 31) 
Sept. U 
Sept. 2, 
Sept. 2, 
Oct. -: 


Sept. 6 


Colon 

Advance.. 
Panama. . . 
AUianca. . . 


Sept. 2 
Sept. 9 
Sept. 16 
Sept. 22 


Sept. 8 
Sept. 16 
Sept. 22 
Sept. 2S 


Sept. 20 
Sept. 29 
Oct. 4 
Oct. 10 



John D. Patterson, 
General Superintendent. 



Appointment of Terminal Trainmaster. 

Panama Railroad Company, 
Office of General Superintendent. 
Colon, R. P., August 19, 1913. 
Circular No. 174: 

All Concerned — Effective Wednesday. August 20, 
Mr. E. S. Waid is appointed terminal trainmaster, in 
charge of Cristobal and Colon yards. 

John D. Patterson, 
General Superintendent. 



Appointment of Port Captain at Colon. 

Colon, R. P.. August 16. 1913. 
Circular No. 166: 

All Concerned — Erfective September 15, 1913, Mr, 
R. VV. Bergin is appointed port captain of the port of 
Colon, in addition to his duties as receiving and for- 
warding agent, vice Mr. J. St. C. Hunt. 

J. D. Patterson, 
General Superintendent. 



Appointment of Terminal Trainmaster, 

Panama Railro.\d Company, 
Office of General Superinte.vdent, 

Colon, R. P.. August 25, 1913. 

ClRCLTLAR No. 18.^: 

Alt Concerned — Effective Monday, September 1, 
1913, Mr. S. W. Ileald is appointed terminal trala* 
master in charge of Panama and Balboa yards. 
John D. Patterson, 
General Superintendent. 



Charge for Brake Service Sundays and Holiday* 

CULEBRA, C. Z., August 12, 1913. 
All District Quartermasters: 

The Chairman has approved recommendation that, 
inasmuch as brake service furnished private Individuals 
is usually required on Sundays and .holidays, or in the 
evenings, and the drivers of the brakes receive no over- 
time for this service, the district quartermasters be 



Septembers, 1913. 



THE CANAL RECORD 



15 



authorized to collect from the parties using the brake, 
one dollar, ($1) United States currency, which sum is 
to be paid to the driver performing the service, his 
receipt to be taken therefor. 
Please be governed accordingb'. 

R. E. Wood, 
Chief QuarUrmasler. 



District Quartermaster Changes. 

CuLEBRA. C. Z.. August 18. 1913. 

AllComerned — Effective September 1. the following 
changes will be made in stations of district quarter- 
masters: 

R. C. Shady, district quartermaster, from Gorgona 
to Corozal. 

J. H. K. Humphrey, district quartermaster, from 
Corozal to Empire. 

J. T. Smith, district quartermaster, from Pedro 
Miguel to Gatun. R. E. Wood. 

Chief Quartermaster. 



Transfer Slips to Show Accrued Vacation Leave. 

Cin^EBRA. C. Z., August 5, 1913. 
Heads of Departments A>fD Divisions: 

In order to comply with the circular of the Chairman 
and Chief Engineer of July 26. to Heads of Depart- 
ments and Divisions, relative to cliarging the divisions 
transferring an employe with accrued vacation leave 
instead of charging the expense to the division re- 
questing the transfer, it will be necessarj', effective 
August 1, to show on the transfer slips furnished the 
departments and divisions the amount of accrued 
vacation leave due. Two copies of transfer slips should 
be sent to the Chief Engineer. 

As this information has not been shown on the 
transfer slips issued during the month of July, please 
furnish me statement, giving the names, amount of 
accrued vacation leave, and the department to which 
transferred, of all employes who have been transferred 
during July. 

In future, the division to which employes are trans- 
ferred will render bills on the basis of the accrued 
vacation leave shown on transfer slips. 

Ad Faijre. 
Cost Keeping Accountant. 



Invoicing Accrued Vacation Leave. 

Culebra, C. Z.. August 18, 1913. 
Heads of Departments and Divisions: 

Referring to the Chairman's circular to the Heads 
of Depaitments and Division authori,;ing bill against 
the department or division transferring employes for 
accrued vacation leave; 

It is not intended that any invoice be rendered for 
less than 21 days, or six months' leave, as, under the 
regulations, no vacation leave is earned under six 
months. 

Bills should only be rendered where the accrued leave 
It for a period of more than six months. 

Ad Faure, 
Cost Keeping Accountant. 



Supplies for the Canal. 

The following steamers with supplies for the Isth- 
mian Canal Commission and Panama Railroad Com- 
pany, arrived at the ports of Balboa. Cristobal, and 
Colon, during the two weeks ending August 30. 1913: 

Colon, August 18. from New York, with four boxes 
machinery for Mt. Hope pumping station, for Atlantic 
Division; five cases tarpaulins, for stock; signal materi- 
al, for Panama railroad; one box brass cocks, one case 
repair parts for monot^'pe. for stock: one case drawing 
material, for Fourth Division; one case drawing ma- 
terial, for stock; 29 reels copper cable, for First Divi- 
sion; 10 boxes plumbing material, 10 cases paint, 213 
bundles pipe, 190 bundles tie plates. 200 kegs wire nails, 
for stock; 52 cases electric fixtures, 20 bundles derail- 
ers. for Panama railroad; two packac;es medical sup- 
plies, for Sanitary Department; J8 barrels foundry 
supplies, for Mechanical Division; SO crates roofing tile, 
for First Division; 242 bundles steel bars, for Fifth 
Division; 25 pieces lumber, for stock. 

Pastores, August 17, from New York, with one case 
file cases, for stock; three cases pipe fittings, for Me- 
chanical Division; two cases packing, 16 pieces chains, 
for stock; 34 barrels transil oil, for Mechanical Divi- 
sion; one rail bender and attachments, for Panama 
railroad; 16 bales life preservers, for stock. 

Carl Schurz. August 18, from New York, with two 
cases vises, 121 pieces pipe, for stock: 151 crates fire 
brick, 13 sacks fire clay, for Mechanical Division; three 
boxes bar steel, five cases paper, for stock. 

Heredia, August 18. from New Orleans, with 2.188 
pieces lumber, for Mechanical Division; 3,691 pieces 
lumber, for stock; 20 pieces lumber, for fortifications; 
ono box chipping hammers, for First Division; 133 
bundles pipe fittings, for stock; 807 barrels paving brick, 
for Panama railroad. 

Olaf, August 18. from St- Marj'S. Georgia, with 1,507 



pieces untreated piling. 151 pieces treated piling, 1.439 
pieces lumber, for stock. 

Metapan. August 20, from New York, with one reel 
copper cable, for First Division; 150 cases linseed oil, 
seven bales steam hose, two cases belt lacing, for stock; 
one crate steel plates, for First Division. 

Atenas, August 21 . from New Orleans, with two cases 
brushes, 29 rolls canvas, four cases sledges. 50 cases 
soap. 183 crates handles. 698 pieces lumber, for stock; 
19 cases iron railings, for Panama railroad. 

Advance, August 26. from New York, with 5.500 
packages hollow tile, for Second Division; two boxes 
brass cocks. 101 drums oil, 12 cases stationary supplies, 
for stock; four crates concrete tile machines, for Second 
Division; 14 barrels crucibles, for foundry, for Me- 
chanical Division; three cases sledges, for stock; 
one launch propeller, for Second Division; 11 boxes 
electric lamps, for Mechanical Division; 121 cases 
steel wire, 18 cases electric fixtures, for Panama railroad; 
one box brushes, for stock; two crates rail benders, for 
Panama Railroad Company; 70 boxes burial caskets, 
for Sanitary Department; one box motors, for Me- 
chanical Division; one box tickets, for Panama Rail- 
road Company; four cases stationary supplies, for 
stock; one box electrical material, for First Division; 
six boxes mower repair parts, for stock; two boxes 
dynamometers, for First Division; 130 barrels molding 
sand, for Mechanical Division; 26 boxes stationary' 
supplies, eight boxes bolts, for stock; one case motor 
car parts, for Mechanical Division; one barrel crockery, 
for Sanitary Department; three cases paint, for stock; 
one box machinery, for Sixth Division; two boxes 
electrical material, for Mechanical Division; seven 
barrels cable fittings, for First Division; three boxes 
insulators, for Mechanical Division; one box castings, 
for Panama Railroad Company; 19 bundles car cast- 
ings, for Mechanical Division; five pieces fittings, for 
Sixth Division; and a miscellaneous cargo, the whole 
consisting of 6.286 packages, weighing 146 tons. 

Prinz August Wilhelm, August 24. from New York, 
with 1.203 pieces pipe, for First Division; eight barrels 
iron pipe fittings, for stock; 120 pieces Iron rods, two 
kegs nuts, for Second Division. 

Tivives. August 24, from New York, with 51 cases 
caustic soda. 1 5 cases paint, for stock; 20 cases machin- 
ery, four reels cable, for First Division; one reel cable 
for Mechanical Division; 13 cases electrical material, 
for First Division; two cases telephone equipment, for 
Panama Railroad Company; 10 barrels copper wire, 
for Mechanical Division; 1,583 pieces, 373 bundles, 
12 cases, 216 pieces, 35 cases structural material, for 
First Division. 

Pennsylvania, August 25. from San Francisco, with 
2,046 pieces lumber, for Fortifications Division; 13 
cases machinery, for SLxth Division; two cases paint, 
for stock. 

Haakon. August 27. from Jacksonville, Florida, with 
469 long tons pig iron, for Mechanical Division; 5,730 
pieces lumber, 1.113 pieces piling. 2.500 cross-ties, for 
stock; five pieces dipper stick, for Sixth Division. 

Parismina. August 25, from New Orleans, with 3,936 
pieces lumber. 100 switch stands and rods. 10 boxes 
chisels. 50 draft mules, for stock; 954 barrels paving 
brick, for Panama Railroad Company. 

Zacapa, August 27. from New York, with 71 reels 
wire rope. 447 bundles shovels, four cases packing, 15 
packages copper, for stock; 20 reels copper-clad wire, 
1,000 crates insulators, 34 cases parts, one box castings, 
for First Division; 354 bundles reinforcing rods, for 
Second Division. 

Turrialha, August 28, from New Orleans, with 625 
pieces lumber, three cases paint brushes, for stock; 
60 barrels brake shoes, for Mechanical Division; 550 
creosoted blocks, for Second Division; one piece rock 
crushing machinery, for Fifth Division; 5.000 pounds 
compound, for First Division. 

Edenhall. August 28, from Baltimore, with 3.000 
pieces sewer pipe, 1,500 kegs spikes. 56.000 pieces 
vitrified tile. 375 barrels sulphate ammonia, 250 bundles 
brooms, for stock; eight cases miter gate moving ma- 
chinery, four cases. 18 pieces castings, for First Division; 
507 pieces. 44 bundles. Zl boxes structural material, for 
Panama Railroad Company; 20 boxes ether, for 
Sanitary Department. 



Sale of Building No. 204, Cartagenlta. 

Office of Chief Quartermaster. 

Culebra. C. Z.. August 29. 1913. 

Sealed proposals will be received at this office until 
3 p. m., Thursday. September U. 1913. and then opened, 
for the purchase of building No. 204. located at Car- 
tagenita, near Paraiso. 

Proposals should be accompanied by certified check, 
post-office money order, or cash, for five per cent (5%) 
of the amount bid. 

Successful bidder will be granted the Com.miasioD 
freight rate of S2.25 per ton over the Panama railroad 
for material recovered from the building, and will be 
required to remove the builduig within 30 days from 
acceptance of bid. 

Intending bidders will be shown the building offered 



for sale, or given any information desired, upon applica- 
tion to Mr. O. S. Farrar, acting district quartermaster, 
Pedro Miguel. 

Envelopes containing proposals should be marked 
"Proposal for purchase of building No. 204" and ad- 
dressed to Capt. R. E. Wood, Chief Quartermaster. 
Culebra, C. Z. 

The right is reserved to accept or reject any or all 
bids. R. E. Wood, 

Chief Quartermaster. 



Misdirected Letters. 

Ancon, C. Z., Septemoer 3. 1913. 
The following insufficiently addressed letteis. origi- 
nating in the United States and its possessions, have 

been received in the office of the Director of Posts, and 
may be secured upon request ol the addressees: 

Amey, Joseph Logan, C. H. 

Atkinson, O. C. Malloy. J. E. 

Beeler. W. D. McLeod. M. W. (photo) 

Broadhiirst, Geo. Myrick, J. C. (daily paper) 

Clark, Geo. Passailaigan. A. E. 

Cole. Cha-les B. Pfuhl. Fred P. (pamphlet) 

Drumm, Jos. Ramey, Wm. 

Ellis. Richard Rounda, Wm. J. 

Finley. G. I. Sangan. James 

Flynn. Patrick J. Scales. Joseph 

Garrison. A. S. Shaw. Miss Ester 

Gorman, John C. Smith. George R. 

Harris. S. B. (3) Smith. James H. 

Holmes. Mr. Dr. Thompson. John C. 

Johnson. Harry L. Triton. Miss Emily 

Jones. W. C. Wells. J. T. 

Kibel, Max Work. Leonard (2) 

letters uncalled for august 27. 1913. 

Blackburn, Ray Mena. Luis 

Blockwood. John Michie, E. M. 

Callahan. John Murphie. Mis3 Fidelna 

Catlin. W. R. Murran. Samuel 

Clarke. Oscar Nicholson, Willian: 

Colby, F. G. Nock. Ivan F. 

Colgan. Jas. Parker, David (2) 

Ellam, Dr. Herbert W. Railey. Hilton H. 

Gibson. James Russell, S. M. 

Gitlin, Miss R. Sensenba-h. Mrs. Wal- 
Guess. P. R. ton F. R. 

Hall. Mrs. Fred P. Smith, Miss Mary L. 

Henry. H. J. Sullivan. J. E. 

Holmes, Frank Sweeney, Mrs. John 

Johnson, Harry C. (2) Tembrom, Rupurth 

K'SLner, Otto VanNess, Albert 

Marriialleck, Clan H. VanNess, Walter 

McGarvey, Edward Webb. E. 

McCord. F. Williams. Gersham 

Wright. John L. (6) 

letters unxalled for august 20. 1913. 

Eaird. Rev. Phil C- Johnson, John B. 

Blanton. Benton Kemper, Wm. Eugene 

brasile, Mr?. 6. G. King. L. A. 

Casil, Tomas London, Pablo (pkg) 

Charnley. T. Larkins Lucas, Joe H. 
Davis. Mrs. Irene Douglas Matthew, Geo. E. 

Devoins. John C. McArthur, Capt. John C. 

Drum, Joseph Miller, Walter 

Dwyer, Martin J. Pflaume, Rev. William O. 

ErI, Henry Randall. Charley (2) 

Emerson. Harry Rawlinson. Oscar 

Foster. S. Rennan, George 

Frampton. Jack Russeau. William 

Froscholen. Miss Marie Snapp, Dr. J. H. 

Godwin, Cliflord B. Strauss, J. R. 

Green, Alfred Talty. Thos. 

Harris, S. B. Trower, Jno. H. 

Hatch. Fletcher Udentz, Mrs. W. J. 

Heimer, Floyd B- Wieben. John 

Hobson. Wm. Wright, Walter J. 

Hopkins, Charlie Zissa. Frank F. 



Sale of Material in Boiler Shed at Gorgona Shop. 

Office of Chief Quarterm.\ster. 

Culebra. C. Z., August 29, 1913. 

Sealed proposals will be received at this office until 
4 p. m., Saturday. September 6. 1913. and then opened, 
for the purchase of the structural material in this build- 
ing. The measurements of the building are approxi- 
mately 40 feet by 104 feet by 24 feet high. This build- 
ing has been torn down and material shipped to Mount 
Hope where it can be inspected. Bidders must familiar- 
ize themselves with condition of material, etc.. as the 
Commission makes no guarantee whatever. Bid will 
be made in a price per gross ton. 

Certified check, money order, or cash for ten per cent 
(10 '^o) of the amount of the bid must accompany bid. 

Envelopes containing proposals should be marked 
"Proposal for purchase of material formerly in boiler 
shed at Gorgona," and addressed to Capt. R. E. Wood. 
Qilef Ouartermaster. Culebra. C. Z. 

R. E. Wood, 
Ckii^ Quarter master . 



Lost — An Eastman kodak, in case, on train leaving 
Panama at 7 p. m., on Sunday, August 31. Finder 
is requested to communicate with J. Langlois, B«x 26. 
Paraiso, C. Z. Reward. 



16 



THE CANAL RECORD 



Vol. VII, No. 2. 



COMMISSARY DEPARTMENT. 

Deliveries of Bread Under New Train Schedule. 
Panama Railroad Company, 

Commissary Department, 
Cristobal, C. Z., August 30. 1913. 
Circular No. 470: 

To Alt Slorfkeepers — Under the train schedule of the 
Panama Railroad Company, effective September 2, 
1913, coramencinK at midnisht, September 1, bread 
will be fonvarded from the Cristobal bakery, as follows: 
For the following points, bread will be fonvarded on 
train No. 3, leavine Colon at 6 a. m.: Colon, Monte 
Lirio, Frijoles. Caimito, Tower "R." New Culebra, 
Pedro Miguel, Paraiso, Miraflores. Corozal. Panama, 

Balboa. , .,, , ^ . 

Bread for the following pomts will be tran.sferred 
at Pedro Miguel Junction from train No. 3 to train No. 
40: Culebra, Empire, Las Cascadas, Bas Obispo. 

The district ouartermaster at Paraiso will arrange to 
handle the bread arriving on train No. 3 from Pedro 
Miguel Junction to Paraiso. 

The district quartermaster at Ancon will handle the 
bre:id for Ancon and Balboa prompcly on arrival of 
train No. 3 at Ancon. 

Bread for Gatnn will be handled on tram No. 121. 
leaving Colon at 7.40 a. m .„ , , ... 

The afternoon deliverv of rolls will be forwarded from 
Colon on train No. 7. leaving Colon at t p. m.. handling 
the bread for points between Colon and Panama, 
transferring for points between Pedro Miguel Junction 
and Bas Obispo to train No. 40. leaving Pedro Miguel 
Junction at .'5.3.S n. m. 

in order that bread may be delivered as soon as pos- 
sible after baking, deliveries will be-made on the fol- 
lowing schedule, at the several points: 

Gatim — Deliveries to be made on the 10 a. m. grocery 
delivery. 

Paratso — Deliveries to be made on the 10.30 a. m. 
grocery delivery. 

Pedro Mianel — Deliveries to be made on the 9.30 
a. ra. grocer\' deliver\-. 

Corozal — Deliveries to be made on the 8 a.m. grocery 
deliverv. 

Ancon — Deliveries to be made from Balboa on the 
10.30 a. m. delivery. 

East Balboa — Deliveries will be made from Balboa on 
the 10.30 a. m. delivery. If any deliveries are made at 
Old Balboa, they can be made by special messenger, 
there being but few white familieslocated in that place. 

Culebra — Deliveries to be made on the 9.30 a. m. de- 
livery. 

Empire — Deliveries to be made on the 10.30 a. ra. de- 
livery. 

Las CascttJas — Deliveries to be made on the 9 a. m. 
delivery. 

Bas Obispo — Deliveries will be made on the S.30 
a. m. deliver^'. 

District quartermasters will arrange to handle the 
afternoon deliveries leaving Colon on train No. 7, 
which are transferred to train No. 46. as they are doing 
at present. 
Approved: John Burke, 

F. O. Whitlock, Manager. 

Acting Subsistence O^icer. 

The commissary stores are open during the follow- . 
Ing hours: 

Cristobal, 8 a. ra. to 12.30 p. m., and 2 to 7 p. ra. 
Balboa, 8 a. in. to 12.30 p. ro., and 2. .TO to 7 p. m. 
Ancon, 8 a. m. to 1 p. m., and 3 to 6 p. m. 
All others, 8 a. m. M 1 p. m., and 3 to 7 p. m. 
Retail prices of cold storage provisions for the week 
beginning September 1. 1913: 

FRESH MEAT. Price. 

Mutton — Stewing, per pound 6 

Shoulder, neck trimmed off (4 pounds 

and over) . per pound 9 

Entire forequartcr (not trimmed, 10 

pounds and over), per pound 8 

Legs (8 to 10 pounds/, per pound. ... 17 

Cutlets, per pound IS 

Short cut chops, per pound 20 

Larab — Stew ing, per pound 6 

Entire forequarter, neck trimmed off, 

per pound 9 

Legs (5 to 8 pounds), per pound 20 

Chops, per pound 24 

Cutlets, per pound 24 

Veal — Stewing, per pound 10 

Shoul'-ler, for roasting (not under 4 

pounds), per pouna 12J 

Chops, shoulder, per pound 17 

Chops, per pound 26 

Loin for roasting, per pound 2fi 

Cutlets, per pound 30 

Beef — Suet, per pound 2 

Soup, ptr pound 5 

Stew, per pound 8 

Plate, per pound 9 

Corned. No. 1, per pound 14 

(Tomed, No. 2. per pound 12 

Chuck roast. 3 lbs. and over, per pound. 12 
Rib roast. Second cut (not under i\ 

pounds), per pound 16 

Rib roast, first cut (not under 3 pounds), 

per pound 18 

Pot roast, per pound 19 

Rump roast, per pound 19 

Porterhouse roast, per pound , 20 

Steak. Chuck, per pound 12i 

Round, per pound 13 

Rib, per pound 18 

Sirloia, per pound 19 



Rum.p, per pound 

Porterhouse (not less than 1 \ 

pounds), per pound 

Tenderloin (Western), per pound. . 

Pork — Loin chops or roast, per pound 

Hams, fresh, per pound 

Shoulders, fresh, per pound 

Spare ribs, per pound 

Backbones, per pound 

Pigs' feet, each 

Pigs' head, \ head 

Sausage meat, fresh, per pound 

miscellaneous. 

Livers — Beef, per pound 

Calf, each 

Half. each. 

Steak, Hamburger, package 

Sausage — Bologna, per pound 

Frankfurter, per pound 

Lieberwurst, per pound 

Devonshire Farm, per pound 

Sweetbread . beef, per pound 

Eggs, fresh, dozen 

one-half dozen only 

Bluefish, per pound 

Halibut, fresh, per pound 

Salmon, per pound 

Roe shad , each 

Shad roes, pair 



POULTRY and game. 

Chickens — Fancy roasting, milk fed. large, each. 

Fancy roasting, milk fed. raed., each. 

Fancy roasting, corn fed, about Si 
pounds, each 

Fancy roasting, corn fed, about 41 

pounds, each 

Fowls, each tfiO, 70, 80, 90 and.. . 

Ducks, (Western, about 4 J pounds), each 

Capon, each 

Broilers, milk fed, each 

Broilers, corn fed, each 

Turkeys, per pound 

Siuabs. eacli 

Rabbits, skinned, each 

Partridges, pair 

Grouse, per pair 

Pheasants 

CURED and pickled MEATS. 

Ham — Genuine Westphalia, per pound 

Ham — Sugar cured, per pound 

Sliced, per pound 

Half, for boiling, per pound 

Boiled, per pound 

Hocks, per pound 

Beef, salt, family, per pound. 

Bacon — Breakfast, whole piece, per pound 

Sliced, per pound 

Ham, lunch, per pound 

Pork. salt, family, per pound 

Ox tongues, each 

Pigs' feet, per pound 

Tongues, per pound 

DAIRY PRODUCTS. 

Bjtter — Creamery, special, per pound 

Sheffield Farms, ectra fancy, per lb. . . 
-FhiUaelpnid cream, cake 

Roquefort, per pound 

\oung America, per pound 

Swiss, per pound 

Edam, each 

Edam, tin 

Parmesan, per pound 

Gouda. pet pound 

Snappy, per cake 

.Milk (ceriilicd), per bottle 

Per-niii-lac. bottle 

Ice cream, rjuart 

J-gallon 

vegetables and FRUITS. 

Beets, per pound 

Celery, per head 

Cabbage, per pound 

Cucumbers, per pound 

Carrots, per pound 

Egg plant, per pound 

Lettuce per pound 

Onions, per pound 

Potatoes, white, per pound 

sweet, per pound 

Parsley, bunch 

Peppers, green, per pound 

Squash, per pound 

'Turnips, per pound 

"Tomatoes, per pound 

Yams, per pound 

C^anteloupes, each 

(irape fruit; tropical, each 

American, each 

Lemons, dozen 

Limes, per hundred 

Peaches, per pound 

Plums ; . . 

Oranges, Jamaican, per dozen 

Watermelons, each 



Cheese 



Price 
19 

20 

30 

17 

S20 

§17 

1.S 

15 

7 

60 

20 

11 
60 
30 
13 

13 
13 
13 
20 
40 

t34 

tl7 

*12 
1.^ 

tl.5 
7.S 
40 

1.40 
1.10 

1.25 

1.00 

1.00 

1.25 

2.00 

70 

60 

U» 

50 

30 

1.30 

1..W 

1.30 

40 
20 

22 
21 
28 

ts 

12 
25 
26 
32 
14 
1.00 
9 
18 



34 

46 

10 

35 

22 

28 

1.00 

2S 

35 

30 

10 

**20 

**20 

t2S 

J50 

3 

6 

4 

4 

4 

4 

tl4 

3 

3 

2 

5 

*6 

3 

4 

6 

3 

5 

4 

l.S 

24 

80 

*8 

10 

18 

*2S 



MOVEMENT OF OCEAN VESSELS. 



♦Indicates reduction from last list. 

♦♦Indicates 5 cents allowed for return of bottle. 

tindicates advance on last list. 

ttFowls weigh each, about as follows: 3. 3J, 4. 4J. 
and 5 pounds. Prices are based accordingly; when 
size ordered is not in stock, next lightest weight is 
supplied and refund note sent for difference. 

tSold only from commissaries; no orders taken for 
delivery. 

§Nat less than half of a fresh ham ot eboulder will be 



The following is a list of sailings of the Panama 
Railroad Steamship Company: of the Royal Mail 
S:eam Packet Company; of the Hamburg-American 
Line, and of ^he United Fruit Company's Line: 

NEW YORK TO CRISTOBAL.* 

Panama P. R. R. . Monday Aug. 25 

Colon P. R. R.. Tuesday Sept. 2 

Advance P. R. R.. Tuesday Sept. 9 

Panama.... P. R. R.. Tuesday Sept. 16 

Allianca P. R. R. .Monday Sept. 22 

Colon P. R. R. .Tuesday Sept. 30 

Advance P. R. R. .Monday Oct. 6 

Panama P. R. R.. Saturday Oct. 11 

Allianca P. R. R.. Saturday Oct. 18 

Colon P. R. R.. Friday Oct. . 24 

Advance P. R. R.. Thursday Oct. 30 

CRISTOBAL TO NEW YORK.* 

Panama P. R. R.. Saturday. . . .Sept. 6 

Colon P. R. R.. Sunday Sept. 14 

Advance P. R. R. .Monday Sept. 22 

Panama P. R.R.. Sunday Sept. 28 

.Allianca P. R. R.. Saturday Oct. 4 

Colon P. R. R.. Sunday Oct. 12 

Advance P. R. R.. Saturday Oct. 18 

Panama P. R. R. .Thursday Oct. 23 

Allianca P. R. R.. Thursday. . . .Oct. 30 

NEW YORK TO COLON. 

Almirante U. F. C. .Wednesday . .Aug. 27 

Oruba R. M... .Saturday Aug. 30 

Carrillo U. F. C. .Saturday Aug. 30 

Prinz Joachim H. -A. .. .Saturday .. . Aug. 30 

Santa Marta U. F. C. . Wednesday. .Sept. 3 

Carl Schuiz H.-A. . .Saturday Sept. 6 

Pastores U. F. C. .Saturday Sept. 6 

Metapan U. F. C. Wednesday. .Sept. 10 

Prinz August Wilhelm. H.-A. .. Saturday ... .Sept. 13 

Tivives U. F. C. Saturday Sept. 13 

Trent R. M . . Saturday Sept. 13 

Zacapa U. F. C. . Wednesday . .Sept. 17 

Emil L. Boas H.-A Saturday Sept. 20 

Sbtaola U. F. C. , Saturday Sept. 20 

COLON TO NEW YORK. 

Zacapa U. F. C. Thursday Sept. 4 

Emil L. Boas H.-A. .. .Tuesday Sept. 9 

Six.aola U. F. C.Tuesday Sept. 9 

Almirante U. F. C. .Thursday Sept. 11 

Prinz Joachim H.-A Tuesday Sept. 16 

Carrillo U. F. C. . Tuesday Sept. 16 

Magdalena R. M Tuesday Sept. 16 

Santa Marta U. F. C. Thursday Sept. 18 

Carl Schurz H.-A... .Tuesday Sept. 23 

Pastores U. F. C. . Tuesday Sept. 23 

Metapan U. F. C. . Thursday. ... Sept. 25 

Danube R. M. . .Tuesday Sept. 30 

Tivives U. F. C. . Tuesday Sept. 30 

Prinz August Wilhelm. H.-A Tuesday Sept. 30 

NEW ORLEANS TO COLON. 

Abangarez U. F. C. . Saturday Aug. 30 

Heredia U. F. C. .Wednesday . .Sept. 3 

Atenas U. F. C. Saturday Sept. 6 

Parismina U. F. C. . W'ednesday . . Sept. 10 

Turrialba U. F. C. . Saturday Sept. 13 

COLON TO NEW ORI EANS. 

Turrialba U.K. C. . Thursday. . . .Sept. 4 

Cartago U. F. C. Saturday. . . .Sept. 6 

Abangarez U. F. C. .Thursday.. . .Sept. 11 

Heredia U. F. C. . Saturday Sept. 1 3 

♦Amended schedule, covering temporary withdrawal 
of the Alliama for repairs. 

Panama Railroad Company's steamers sail from Pier 
11. Cristobal, at 3 p. m. 

Royal Mail steamers leave for New York on alter- 
nate Tuesdays at 1 p. m.; for Southampton on alter- 
nate Tuesdays at 10. a. m. 

United Fruit Company's ships for New Orleans 
direct, leave on Thursdays and Saturdays at 3 p. m. ; 
ships for New York via Km&ston. on Tuesdays at 1.30 
p. m. and Thursdays at 1.30 p. m.; for Bocas del Toro, 
on Mondays at 5 p. m.; for Limon. via Bocas del 
Toro. on Tuesdays at 5 p. m., and for Limon direct, 
Tuesdays at 3 p. ra. 

Hamburg-American steamers sail for New York, via 
Kingston and Santiago de Cuba, on Tuesdays, the 
Prinz Joachim and Prinz Augusi IViUt^m 3,t 10 a. m. 
and the Emil L. Boas and Cari Schurz at 2 p. m. 



Lost — On P. R. R. train leaving Panama at 2 a. m.. 
on Sunday. August 31, Elks card case with Elks and 
Shrine cards enclosed. Finder kindly mail to W. H. V. 
F.. Box No. 1, Bas Obispo. C. Z. 



Lost — Between house No. 2S7-B, Ancon. and Hotel 
Central, Panama, one gold brooch of conventional 
design, with two ruby and one pearl sets. Return to 
above addree&i and r«cfiiv« reward. 



CANAL 




RECORD 



Volume VII. 



ANCON, CANAL ZONE, WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 10, 1913. 



No. 3. 



The Canal Record 

Published weekly under the authority and supervision of 
the Isthmian Canal Com7nission. 



The Canal Record is published free of charge, one copy 
each to all employes of the Commission and Panama 
Railroad Company whose natnes are on the gold roll. 
Extra copies and back numbers can be obtained from the 
newsstands of the Panama Railroad Company for five 
cents each. 



Address all Communications. 

THE CANAL RECORD, 

Ancon, Canal Zone. 

Isthmus of Panama. 

No communication, either for publication or requesting 
information will receive attention uriless signed with the 
full name and address of the writer. 

NOTES OF PROGRESS. 



Closing Down In Culebra Cut. 

All steamshovels in the Empire district 
of the Culebra Cut section were withdrawn 
on Saturday, September 6, and only three 
were working on the bottom in the Culebra 
district on Monday, September 8. These 
will stop work by Saturday, September 13. 
Seven crews were laid off on Saturday night, 
and 17 more will be laid off during the present 
week. The removal of the construction tracks 
in the Cut was begun on September 2, and 
the work is well ahead of the schedule. The 
last sightseeing train to go through the Cut 
was on Friday, September 5. 



Opening Channel from Ocean to Gatun Locks. 

Since the removal of the railroad track 
across the lower approach to Gatun Locks, 
on September 2, two pipeline suction dredges 
have been engaged in excavating the barrier 
of earth over which railway communication 
had been maintained with the west side of 
the locks and Gatun Dam. Two steamshovels, 
six locomotives, and an assortment of box, 
flat, and dump cars, have been left isolated 
on the west side for the completion of the dam 
and spillway, and the general work of clearing 
up. Such traffic as may be necessary with the 
west side may be effected by means of barges, 
traversing the French canal to the unloading 
wharves for sand and rock, and articles 
weighing up to six tons maybe carried across 
the lower end of the locks by the cableways. 
Rock and sand, however, sufficient for the 
completion of concrete work, are in storage 
near the cement shed, and the quantity of 
structural steel and other building materials, 
and operating machinery to be handled for 
the completion of the locks and spillway is 
relatively small. — 

At the time of the removal of the railway, 
tbe barrier was approximately 75 feet wide 
at the top, which is about eight feet above 
sealevel, with a slope of about one on two to 
the depth of the compWted channel on either 



side, 41 feet below mean sealevel. It contains 
about 180,000 cubic yards of material, which 
will probably be removed by October 1. Com- 
munication is now open to the lower end of 
the locks, through the gap which the railroad 
crossed on a removable span, and in the prog- 
ress of excavation the gap is being continually 
enlarged. 



CROSSING THE CANAL. 



Dredge "No. 82" Set at Work. 

Suction dredge No. 82, which was towed 
through the lake channel from Gatun on Au- 
gust 26, began its task of removing the ac- 
cumulation of mud and grave! from the bed 
of the Canal a few hundred yards north of 
Gamboa dike, on Tuesday. September 2. 
The material is forced through the discharge 
pipe across an island in the lake, thence over 
the old channel of the Chagres River io the 
west bank, where it is wasted into low places 
in the vicinity of Matachin. Recent measure- 
ments show that about 750,000 cubic yards 
of material will have to be removed to restore 
the Canal channel to its original depth. 
About 300,000 cubic yards were left by 
the Central Division, and the remainder 
has been brought down by the Chagres 
River since the steamshovels finished work 
in that section about three years ago. 
Dredge No. 82, which was used in making 
the hydraulic fill of Gatun Dam, has been 
idle since June, 1912. It has been overhauled 
for the present work. 



First Aid Packages at the Canal Locks. 

First aid packages will be placed at all of 
the locks to cover cases of possible electrical 
burns. These packages will be small, con- 
taining a battle of oil, bandages, and prob- 
ably an antiseptic wash, and will be distribu- 
ted, as follows: Gatun, nine; Pedro Miguel, 
three; Miraflores, six. They will be placed in 
the transformer rooms, where convenient 
cabinets for their protection will be available. 



Removal of People from Watersheds. 

People living on the watersheds of the 
Caimitillo, Cameron, and Dominica Rivers 
will be required to tear down or remove their 
houses on or before October 1. These streams 
will become tributaries of Miraflores Lake 
when the lake is formed, flowing into that 
arm of the lake on which will be situated 
the new water works for the Pacific end of 
the Canal. 



Transfer of Work on Hydroelectric Plant. 

Effective September 8, the construction of 
the building, and installation of machinery in 
the hydroelectric plant at Gatun was placed 
under the supervision of the First Division, 
Office of the Chief Engineer. The construc- 
tion of the building will be in charge of Mr. 
Frank Holmes, resident engineer. Quarter- 
master's Department, subject to supervision 
by the Assistant Chief Engineer, 



Wooden Pontoon Structure To Take the Place of 
Bridge 57i at Paraiso. 

The construction of a wooden pontoon 
bridge as a means of crossing the Canal after 
it becomes necessary to dismantle bridge 
No. S7§, at Paraiso, has been approved. 
The crossing will be made a little north of 
this bridge, and the work of excavating for the 
east approach has already been begun. The 
plans are based upon designs obtained from 
the Chicago, Milwaukee and St. Paul Railway, 
which has used pontoon bridges of this type 
for many years. One of the most notable 
of its bridges is that over the Mississippi 
River at Prairie du Chien, Wis., which has 
been in service 35 or 40 years. In the con- 
struction of the Canal pontoon bridge, a 
somewhat simpler design will be followed, 
consisting of a timber scow 55 feet wide, 378 
feet long, and six feet deep. On top of this 
hull, a wooden trestle, following quite closely 
the ordinary type of construction, will be 
built to an elevation of about 113.5 feet, 
and on this will be placed a railroad track and 
a highway for vehicles. The spans will be 14 
feet between centers, and at these points, a 
transverse wooden truss, with iron rods, will 
be placed in the hull to carry the concentrated 
loads. Lighter trusses, without rods, will be 
placed at 2-foot intervals between the heavier 
trusses. The sheathing on the hull will be four 
inches thick at the bottom and sides, and three 
inches on top. To minimize the bending and 
shearing stresses to which the structure will 
be subjected, the design includes two heavy 
stiffening trusses, the stringers under the 
rails being utilized as top chords, while the 
lower chords are placed at the bottom of the 
hull. In addition, there will be heavy longi- 
tudinal keelsons. 

The bridge is designed for a train load of 
4,000 pounds per running foot. In order to 
reduce the e.xpense of the approaches as much 
as possible, it is proposed to use as a connec- 
tion between the bridge and the shore some 
of the spare lock gate girders, supported on 
rockers. These rocking approaches will have 
a downward grade w-hen the water is at a 
low level, and an upward grade when it is 
at a high level. The pontoon will turn 
about a fi.xed pivot, and to avoid its pro- 
jecting into the fairway of the Canal, a recess 
will be e.xcavated in the east bank, .so that 
when the bridge is opened, it will leave the 
Canal channel unobstructed. About 600,000 
feet B. M. of yellow pine, or fir, timber, and 
375,000 pounds of steel and iron, will be 
required. 

The designs for the bridge are being pre- 
pared by Mr. Henry Goldmark, designing 
engineer in the First Division. Mr. W. G. 
Comber, resident engineer of the Sixth Divi- 
sion, will have charge of building the pon- 
toon, trestle, and trusses, and Mr. A. S. 
Zinn, acting division engineer of the Central 



18 



THE CANAL RECORD 



Vol. VII, No. 3. 



Division, will have charge of the excavation 
and construction of the approaches and all 
land connections of the bridge. 

The pontoon is not intended for a perma- 
nent crossing, and will probably be aban- 
doned, when the villages on the west bank 
of the Canal cease to exist. 



To Pass Dredges Through Bridge Across the Cut. 

Forces of the Panama railroad began on 
August 29, the installation of a removable 
span near the center of Bridge 57i, across 
Culebra Cut, opposite Paraiso. This is in 
preparation for the passage of dredging vessels 
after October 10, engaged in the completion 
and maintenance of the channel. The span 
will be built on two 66-foot plate girders, re- 
covered from the Barbacoas bridge over the 
Chagres, on the old main line, and will allow 
a clearance of 60 feet between the supporting 
bents. The molded breadth of the ladder 
dredge Corozal, the widest vessel in the dredg- 
ing fleet, is 45 feet. When it is desired to pass 
a vessel through the bridge, a barge will be 
floated under the span, the latter will be lifted 
clear on jacks, and the barge towed aside. 
It is estimated that removal and replacement 
will consume altogether about two hours. 
A removable span has been in successful use 
in the track over the barrier across the lower 
approach to Gatun locks; in this instance, a 
40-foot queen-truss span was handled by loco- 
motive crane. 

This provision will necessitate the removal 
of four of the present bents of the trestle, 
and the erection of two new bencs to support 
the ends of the span. The tops of these will 
be lower than the present bents, in order that 
the rails and stringers of the span may be 
even with the corresponding parts of the ad- 
jacent trestle. The total weight of the span, 
including the floor of the footbridge, will be 
approximately 68 tons, making the dead load 
on the support at either end 34 tons, and the 
maximum load, under a locomotive, about 
114 tons. It is believed that the presence of 
water in the Cut will not affect the stability 
of the trestle, as most of the bents areanchorcd 
to rock by means of concrete pedestals. 
The bridge is approximately 57 feet high, 
with its base at 40 feet above sealevel, so 
that with the water in the cut at its maximum 
elevation the top will be 10 feet above the 

surface. 

♦ 

Mailing of Steamship Tickets. 

The steamship ticket agent of the Panama 

Railroad Company at Colon is compelled to 

answer numerous telephone inquiries from 

employes, after the arrival of ships, as to 

when their steamship tickets will be forwarded 

to them. In a great many of these cases the 

employes have failed to give their post-office 

address when sending in their transportation 

papers, making it impossible to mail out 

their tickets. It is necessary for employes 

to give their post-office address if they e.xpect 

tickets to be mailed to them, when sending in 

their transportation papers. 



Levelman and Transitman Examination. 

Examination for promotion to the positions 
of levelman and transitman is scheduled to be 
held in the Commission clubhouse at Empire, 
on Sunday, October 12. 

The examination will commence promptly 
at 9 a. m., and will be divided into three parts, 
which will be given in the order indicated, viz: 
Written and oral examinations, and a state- 
ment of education and experience. Competi- 



tors will be required to complete the written MIRAFLORES SPILLWAY DAM. 

portion of the examination before 1 p. m. , 

Applications for examination should be ad- 

j J ... ^u J • J iT I ,t J J Finished September 1, its Construction was Rap- 

dressed to the undersigned, through the head ,d considering Difficulties Encountered. 

of department or division, before the close of ,.,,-,, , , . , , 

business on Thursday, October 9. '' '^ hAev^A that the completion of the 

Applicants should bring to the examination construction of the Miraflores spillway dam 

room pens, pencils, triangles, and tables of o" September 1 constitutes a record for speed 

;-;.-„, ,1.,, f,.„ t: K * „ „ _ : I m difficult construction work on the Canal. 

circular tunctions, but no paper, ink, or , . , , r , , .• t^- 

blotters view ot the tact that the waters ot Kio 

a„„i;!,.,„*„ ,„i f.,-1 t„ -, „,- f „„,„;„^ Grande River Cwhich are a combination of the 

Applicants who tail to appear tor examina- „• ^ , tV , ^i- , ,^ ,• ,^ 

,.• „ t,„f n „ ~ „ u„ J * 1 f„ i^>o Grande, l^edro Miguel, Cocoli, Cameron 

tion betore 9 a. m., or who do not apply tor ,„...,,_. ,^ , , , 

„^..,„;„,i.;„„ *;,_„.. „i, *i,^ u „i u„ and Caimitillo Rivers) pass through the site 

examination through the proper channels be- , , , , i- , , • r ■■■ 

f„„ ^u 1 f 1, • -ru A„ n and had to be diverted three times to tacili- 

tore the close ot business on Ihursday, Uc- , . , . , , 

»„K„- o „,;ii „„» u„ ^A^-^t^A ♦„ *u„ „„,~: tate the construction during the progress of 

tober 9, will not be admitted to the e.xamina- , , , . ,« , . r , 

-, ..... ... , . J the work; also, prior to March 1 ot the present 

tion. JNo card ot admission will be needed. ^i, /^ ^ i t-v • ■ ... i t 4.u 

. „ j^ year the Central Division tracks from the 

„, . ■ ' . . „' J Culebra Cut passed through the site, the 

Chairman, hxaminine board. . ^i i. 5- j 

^lu r^ 1 c 1- ^<n. -> excavation was greatlv handicapped. 

Culebra, C. /.., September 6, 1913. ~, . , • ^^t r ^ ■ i _^u j i. 

^ ^ !__ The main dam is 432 feet in length and has 

Concrete Work In Locks and Spillways. a bottom width of 91 to 105 feet, with the 

Concrete work in the Canal locks is nearly bottom on solid rock at elevation 25 feet 

completed, the aggregate amount in place below mean sealevel. 

at the close of work on September 6, being To protect against washing of the banks on 

4,479,425 cubic yards. the spillway side, the dam has two wing or 

A statement of the concrete laid in the retaining walls, one on the east and one on the 

three sets of locks for the Canal, and in west end, each approximately 250 feet long, 

Gatun and Miraflores spillways, as ol Septera- and a core wall 134 feet long joins themain 

ber 6, follows : dam with the lock walls. 

G.\TUN Locks. . Construction work was made diflicult and 

The last concrete for the locks proper, as distinguished . ,• ^„ .,„.,„, ,„+^ „f 4.u„ i a f^^*- m...r-t,;.,^,^T 

from that necessarj- to finishing work by the First tedious on account of the 10-foot machinery 

Division, was mbced and placed on August 16, 1913. tunnel located within the main tunnel, with 

At tlie close of work on that day the total amDunt ol o_.-,;_ <.„arp nf nnp fnof- arniinrl thp sJHps anH 

concrete placed by the Atlantic Division amounted to an -air space ot one toot arouna tne siaes ana 

2.045.485 cubic yards. top throughout the length of the dam and 

PEDRO MIGUEL LOCK. ending in towers at the ends of the dam. 
Concrete lata. ^ , . . ,. . , 

Cubic yards. these towers having winding Stairways, partly 

^^'^: ^)' ,i,'VS'\ ■ ' interior and partly exterior. 

Sept. 1 (Holiday) ^ , * / , . . . , 

Sept. 2 87 In order to make the gate joints watertight 

f'^Pf- ^ 5? it was necessary to set the steelwork for 

Sept. 4 42 / . . 

Sept. 5 41 gates and roller-bearing tracks with accuracy, 

S'^P'- * ^ necessitating care in placing the concrete for 

Total 24S the piers lest the steelwork be deflected. 

Previously reported 92Z,50& -Yhers are eight Stoney gates 47 feet long 

Grand total 923.756 and 19 feet deep. The elevation of top of 

MIRAFLORES LOCKS. the ogcc Ot crcst of the dam is 38.67 feet, 

Se"p1'. ^I'cHolidiy) •'.'.'■ '.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.".'.'.'.".'.'.' ff ^"'^ '''^ elevation of top of gate piers is 85.17 

Sept. 2 64 feet above mean sealevel, or a total height of 

I^Pf ■ \ J J2 concrete from bottom of dam to top of piers 

Sept! s.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.V.'.'.'.'.'".'.'.V.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'. 118 of 110.17 feet. 

^'^P'' * ^ The total amount of excavation required 

Total 535 was 135,000 cubic yards. 

Previously reported '■^O"'^*^ The total amount of concrete laid, not 

Grand total 1,510,184 including the drainage opening, which will not 

GATUN SPILLWAY.* be closcd Until the lattct part of September, IS 

Sept. 1 (Holiday) t^/ot u- a 

Sept. 2. 78 73,482 cubic yards. 

Sept. 3 136 The last concrete was placed for the piers 

Sept! s........... ................ ...... 176 on August 27, and the steel footbridges on 

Sept. 6 188 top were all in place August 29; the eight 

Total 762 gates set in the openings were ready to be 

Previously reported 234.154 shoved against the seals on August 30. The 

Grand to.al 234.916 Stoney gates weigh 40 tons each, and were 

MiR.yLoRES SPILLWAY. handled from a trestle along the north face 

The total of concrete at Miraflores spillway— 75.610 f j^e dam by two locomotive cranes. One at 
cubic yards — remained unchanged, no concrete having , r i. 

beer land during the week ending September 6. each end of the gate. 

.♦Includes hydroelectric station. The principal part of the concrete for the 

• dam was mixed by the berm cranes at the 

Record of Masons. ^^^^^j^ ^^^ ^^^^ ^j^g ^f ^^^ Miraflores locks, 

On account of dithculty m securing photo- ^^^ ^ |j^j ^^ ^^^^^^ ^^^j.^^^ ^„ ^^^^^^^^ 
graphs, and complying with numerous re- ^^^^^^^ ^ narrow-gage locomotives on 

quests, the dosing date for receipt of ap- u -i^ r »u t, a a- 

^,. ■ c .u ..r> J r M .11 tracks built from the berm cranes and ending 

plications for the Record of Masons on the . • . ». „ „„ ^i, ^„„ „f »i „ . 

t, ,-,.ii.i_ JJT.L in various spurs to the south toe ot the dam, 

Panama Canal has been extended by the , ^, . u ji j »„ *u„ s ~. 

«, • /-I u f n- • . r\ » u ic ini7 where the concrete was handled to the forms 

Masonic Club of Empire, to October 15, 1913. . . • , ji „ »• 

. , ^. ■ ' I.- L 1 ._ by derricks and locomotive cranes. 

Information concerning this book can be 

obtained by wTiting to W. I. Beam, chairman * 

of committ ee, Empire ^ C. Z. united Spanish War Veterans. 

The regular dance of the Cristobal Dane- Chagres Camp will hold a dance in the 

ing Club will be held on Saturday, September Gatun clubhouse on Saturday evening, Sep- 

13, at the CommissiDn clubhouse. tember 13. 



Septtmbtr 10, 1913. 



THE CANAL RECORD 



19 



JOINT LAND COMMISSION. 



Additional Awards. 
The following additional awards were an- 
nounced by the Joint Land Commission at an 
open session held on Tuesday, September 2: 

Award No. 27 — In the matter of the claim of Juan 
Soiillo for a house in the lou'n of Cor go na — On April 8. 
1913. Juan Sotillo fled a claim with the Joint Commis- 
sion for house tax No. 733 in Gorgona, and for the lot 
on which the said house is built. 

As respects the claim to the ownership of the lot. 
the earliest deed presented by the claimant is dated 
March 19. 1887 (No. 125) in which M Pretelt Amador 
makes conveyance to Ricardo de la Ossa. of house and 
lot situated in the town of Gorgona. This deed contains 
the following clause: 

"In this sate is included the portion of the lot 
which has not been built upon. This lot has a 
frontase of ten meters, ninety centimeters, and a^ 
depth of seventeen meters, seventy centimeters 
The said lot was acquired by conveyance from 
Justo Maria de la Espriella. who had acquired title 
to said lot by cession from the political authorities 
of the aforesaid district in accordance with the 
requirements of law." 

The claimant in this case. Juan Sotillo. has been un- 
able to present to the Commission any evidence of the 
conveyance made by the municipality of Gorgona to 
Justo Maria de la Espriella. Much light, however, is 
thrown on the situation by a deed executed at the same 
period, to wit, April 4. 1887. by the same grantor, Justo 
Maria de la Espriella, in a conveyance made to another 
property in the town of Gorgona to Alfred Lindo. This 
deed (No. 83), after reciting the conveyance of the 
house recited that the grantor conveys all his 

"rights acquired in the land on which the afore- 
said house is constructed, by purchase by me from 
Rafael Peladorio Marquez. the first day of March 
of this year, in full legal form in accordance with 
Article 5 of the Executive Decree No. 45 of March 
16, 1886, of this department." 

It is evident that the decree of March 16, 1886, can- 
not be made the basis for a claim of ownership of lands 
in Gorgona. inasmuch as this decree, which provided 
for the issuance of renewable permits for the occupancy 
of tovin lots in Gorgona. expressly denies title of build- 
ing lots to the recipients of such permits. The claim- 
ant in this case has been unable to furnish the Com- 
mission with a copy of the document under which 
Justo Maria de la Espriella conve>'ed the property to 
Manuel Pretelt Amador. It is evident, however, from 
the deed executed at the same period by the said Justo 
Maria de la Espriella in a conveyance to Alfred Lindo, 
that the said Justo Maria de la Espriella confused the 
right of occupancy under the decree of March 16, 1886, 
with the actual title to the lot. 

In view of the fact that the claimant in this case has 
not been able to furnish satisfactory evidence of title 
to the land, and in view of the circumstance that one 
of his predecessors in interest has evidently based his 
claim to ownership of the land on an executive decree 
which expressly denies such ownership, the Commission 
has reached the conclusion that the claim of the said 
Juan Sotillo to ownership of the building lot on which 
House 733 was erected cannot be sustained, and should 
not be taken into consideration in making an award 
in this case. 

With respect to House 733, the evidence before the 
Commission shows that Sotillo was the owner of the 
house before he accepted any lease from the Isthmian 
Canal Commission. 

In conformity with the principles formulated in the 
opinion of July 25. 1913, on the demurrer of Counsel 
for the United States to the jurisdiction of the Commis- 
sion in the matter of the claim of Juan Sotillo. and in 
accordance with the evidence submitted to the Com- 
mission, an award is hereby made against the United 
States of America in favor of Juan Sotillo for house No. 
733 in the town of Gorgona, said award to include all 
rights, claims, and interest of the said Sotillo in this 
building, together with any claim for improvements 
of whatever nature in the building lot upon which it 
is located, in the sum of $530. 

This award shall be paid to Juan Sotillo on or before 
the 20th day of September, 1913, and if payment or 
tender of payment of this award is not made on or before 
that date, it shall thereafter bear interest at the rate of 
six per centum, per annum, uutil paid. 

Award No. 28 — In the matter of the claim of Josi 
H. Stilson to the propefty designated as Barro Colorado 
Ahajo — An award is hereby made against the United 
States of America for the estate of Barro Colorado Abajo. 
said award to include all right, title, and interest of 
any persons to the entire estate not heretofore acquired 
by the United States, together with all claims for im- 
provements of whatsoever nature which may be made 
by the owners of said estate, in the sum of $2,000. 

This award shall be paid to the claimant hereinafter 
named, in this amount herein spaci&ed, on or before the 



2d day of October. 1913, and if payment or tender of 
payment of this award is not made on or before that 
date, said award shall thereafter bear interest at the rate 
of six per centum, per annum, until paid. 

To Jos^ H. Stilson for all of his rights, claims, 
and interest in the estate of Barro Colorado Abajo. 
together with any improvements which may be 
claimed by the same, the sum of $2,000. 
Award No. 29 — In the matter of the claims of the 
Colombian Fruit Company, Ltd., and Henry Andtrson. 
{Peuas blancas Arriba, etc.) — -Claims were filed before 
the Joint Commission by the Colombian Fruit Com- 
pany as owner and Henry Anderson as mortgagee 
for the lands known as Penas Blancas Arriba and part 
of the lands known as Bohio y Buena \'ista on the 
south bank of the River Chagres, nearly opposite the 
old townsite of Bohio. An examination of the evidence 
in this case shows that the designations given to the vari- 
ous portions of the original estate of Ahorca Lagarto 
and Bohio Soldado are often conflicting, and that the 
limits assignable to these subdivisions of the original 
estate cannot be precisely determined. 

An award is hereby made against the United States 
of America for the estate of Peflas Blancas Arriba, 
said award to include all right, title, and interest of 
any persons to the entire estate not heretofore acquired 
by the United States, together with all claims for im- 
provements of whatsoever nature on the part of the 
owners of said estate, together with any rights, claims, 
or interests which the claimant hereafter named may 
have in any part of the land known as Bohio y Buena 
Vista, in the sum of Sl.500. 

This award shall be paid into the Circuit Court of 
the Second Judicial District at Empire for distribution 
according to the terms of this award on or before the 
2nd day of October, 1913. and if not paid into the 
said court on or before the said date, the award shall 
bear interest thereafter at the rate of six per centum, 
per annum, until paid. 

To the Colombian Fruit Company. Limited, 
for all rights, claims or interest in the lands of 
Peiias Blancas Arriba, not heretofore acquired 
by the L^nited States, together with any improve- 
ments which may be claimed by the same and for 
any right, title, or interest which they may pos- 
sess in lands known as Bohio y Buena Vista, the 
sum of $1,500. 

This award is subject to such equities, if any. as may 
be possessed by third parties, and it is directed that the 
amount of this award be deposited with the Circuit 
Court of the Second Judicial District of the Canal Zone 
for distribution in accordance with the terras of this 
award. 



STEAMSHOVEL RECORDS. 



Foundry at Balboa Shops in Full Operation. 

The first "blow" of steel from the steel 
foundry recently transferred to Balboa shops 
from Gorgona was made at Balboa on Sep- 
tember S; the first iron and brass castings 
from the new foundrj' were made on August 
15 and 20, respectively. The transferred 
oxy-acetylene plant produced its first cyl- 
inders of gas on September 6. Most of the 
work of the Mechanical Division of the class 
formerly performed at Gorgona is being done 
at Empire shops, the principal activities at 
Balboa shops consisting of foundry' and pla- 
ning mill operations, and work by the struc- 
tural gangs engaged in installing machinery 
and motors at the new location. 



Ancon Crusher. 

The following is a statement of rock 
crushed at Ancon quarry during the three 
weeks ending September 6, 1913: 



Cubic 
yards. 



August 18. 

August 19. 

August 20. 

August 2i. 

August 22. 

August 23 . 



1.383 
1.279 
1.830 
1,938 
1.461 
1.523 



Total. 



August 25. 
August 26. 
August 27. 
August 28. 
August 29. 
August 30, 



_9^4I6 
1,714" 
1,865 
1,830 
2.036 
2,597 
2,002 



Total 12,044 



Hours 

worked. 



1.50 
6.45 
7.10 
6.30 
5.20 
7.50 



_35 52 
5.50 
6.35 
6.. 35 
7.30 
7.20 
7.40 



41.30 



Sept. 1 (Holiday) 

Sept. 2 

Sept. 3 

Sept. 4 

Sept. 5 

Sept. 6 



2,176 
1,981 
1.476 
2.050 
1,790 



ToUl. 



9,473 



6.45 
6.35 
7.25 
7.05 
7.25 



Work of Central Division Shovels During the 
Month of August. 

During the month of August, the total 
amount of material excavated in the Central 
Division was 926,900 cubic yards, of which 
843,700 cubic yards were excavated by Cen- 
tral Division forces, and 83,200 cubic yards 
were removed by sluicing at Gold Hill, the 
latter work being in charge of the Fifth Di- 
vision of the Chief Engineer's Office. Of the 
amount removed by the Central Division, 
185,441 cubic yards were classified as earth, 
and 658,259 cubic yards as rock. 

Of the total, 893,300 cubic yards were pri- 
mary e.\cavation for the Canal, and 33,600 
cubic yards were classified as "Plant" excava- 
tion. 

Eight h undred and forty-three thousand and 
seven hundred cubic yards were removed by 
steamshovels. 

The high record for the month was made 
by shovel No. 215, working 3S| days in the 
Empire district, which excavated 42,500 
cubic yards of rock. 

The second best record for the month was 
made by shovel No. 203, working 36 days 
in the Empire district, which e.\cavated 
40,500 cubic yards of rock. 

The best record for a shovel of the 70- 
ton class was made by shovel No. 101, work- 
ing 25 days in the Culebra district, which exca- 
vated 27,246 cubic yards of earth. 

Shovel No. 230, working in the Culebra 
district, made a high record for one day by 
excavating 2,226 cubic yards of rock on 
August 15. 

Shovel No. 215, working on 12-hour shift 
in the Empire district, made a high record 
of 3,816 cubic yards of earth on August 11. 

E.\cept where noted, monthly reports are 
computed on place measurement, while the 
daily reports are based on car measurement. 
The best records for the month, and for one 
day, are shown in the following table: 
BEST RECORDS FOR THE MONTH. 

CULEBRA DISTRICT. 







Cubic 


Yards 




Shovel 
No. 


Earth. 


RoLk. 


Total. 


No. of 
days at 
work. 


208 


38,712 




Vi.soi ' 

30,000 


38,712 
3l.8ri 
30,000 


25 


226 




228 




35 











EMPIRE district. 






215 


, 42.500 


42.500 
40.500 1 
29.200 1 


3SJ 

36 

25J 


203 

217 


40.500 

29.200 







BEST RECORDS FOR ONE DAY. 



i 


Location. 


Date. 


Character of 

material 

excavated. 


Cubic 
yards. 


256 


Empire 


Aut.21. Rock 

.Aug. 6. Rock 

Aug. 27. Rock- _ 


1 2.128 


-)17 


Ercp're 


1 956 


230 
207 
230 


Culebra 

Culebra 

Culebra 


Aug. 15. 
.Aug. 25 
Aug. 27. 


Earth 

Rock 

Earth 


1 2 [226 

2.147 

1 2.067 



Note. — The excess number of days over and above 
the actual number of working days in the month of 
Augt.st (26) is due to double shift and night work. 



35. IS 



Feast of Zebulon. 

All Master Masons are invited to attend 
the Feast of Zebulon, given under the auspices 
of the Masonic Club of Empire, at Kangaroo 
Hall, Empire, C. Z., Saturday evening, Sep- 
tember 13, 1913, at 8.15 p. m. The usual 
charge of SI will be made. All who expect to 
attend should notify J. L. Caldwell, secretary, 
Empire, C. Z. 



20 



THE CANAL RECORD 



Yol. ril,li».3. 



COAL HANDLING PLANT. 

Description of Macliinery which will be Installed 
at Canal Termini. 

Awards were made on August 12 for the 
coal-handling machinery and accessories at 
Cristobal and Balboa called for by Circular 
No. 763. Under these awards, the Hunt 
Construction Company of New York City 
will furnish si.x unloading towers, four for 
the Cristobal plant and two for the Balboa 
plant, and Augustus Smith of Bayonne, 
N. J., the remainder of the equipment. The 
cost of the unloading towers will be §485,735, 
and that of the balance of the machinery 
$1,^47,392, a total cost for machinery for both 
plants of SI, S33, 127, divided, as follows: 
Cristobal, §1,307,941, Balboa, §525,186. 

The bids were opened in Washington on 
June 14, 1913, and five tenders were received, 
ranging in amounts, for both plants, from 
$3,894,750 to §1,300,890. The different pro- 
posals were given careful study. A commit- 
tee, consisting of Col. H. F. Hodges, Civil 
Engineer H. H. Rousseau, Mr. H. A. A. Smith, 
and Civil Engineer F. H. Cooke, appointed by 
the Chairman to review the bids, recommend- 
ed on August 11 acceptance of the proposal 
of Augustus Smith as the lowest satisfactory 
offer, with the understanding that he is to 
submit, with the exception of the loading 
towers, satisfactory proposal to obtain in- 
creased storage of coal by widening his re- 
claiming bridges 50 feet, and by increasing 
their clearance five feet, this enlargement to 
apply to all items of the Cristobal coaling 
plant. The committee further recommended 
that award be made to the Hunt Construction 
Company for the six unloading towers, with 
the understanding that the contractor will 
adapt the towers bid on to the remainder 
of the Augustus Smith designs. Under the 
award, Mr. Smith agrees to begin delivery of 
the machinery for the Cristobal plant within 
six months, and to complete delivery and 
erection in 24 months. Under the adopted 
plan at Balboa, he will begin delivery within 
six months, and complete delivery and erec- 
tion in 30 months. 

GENERAL PLANS. 

In general, each plant will consist of two 
water fronts and a storage pile. The water 
fronts will be designated as the unloading 
wharf and the reloading wharf, while the 
storage pile is to consist of a basin for coal, 
a part of which is to be stored subaqueously, 
and the remainder to be piled above it in the 
dry. Each plant will be arranged to receive, 
store, and deliver separately, coal belonging 
to individuals and companies, as well as to 
the Government; to receive it from any 
part of the unloading wharf and transport it 
to any part of the storage pile; to reclaim 
coal from any part of the storage pile and 
deliver it to any part of the reloading wharf, 
and to transfer it from any part of the storage 
pile to any other part of same. Coal will 
be received at each plant by movable unload- 
ing towers running on rails supported by the 
unloading wharf, and reloaded to colliers and 
barges by movable reloaders running on rails 
supported by the reloading wharf. The 
storage pile at the Cristobal plant is to be 
commanded by movable stocking and re- 
claiming bridges running on rails parallel 
to the longitudinal side walk of the coal basin. 
The storage pile at Balboa will be commanded 
by four berm cranes, now at Miraflores, 



traveling on rails supported by a suitable con- 
crete and steel trestle running longitudinally 
of the basin. 

CRISTOBAL COALING PLANT. 

This will be the main coaling plant, and the 
machinery specifications were based upon the 
following storage facilities, exclusive of the 
requirements of individuals and companies: 

Tons. 

Wet storage, reserved for naval use 100.000 

Dry storage, for Canal use 100.000 

Emergency storage 100.000 

Total 300.000 

The preliminary plans for this plant pro- 
vided for a normal coal storage pile 1,000 feet 
in length, so laid out as to be capable of an 
extension 700 feet in length. The demand for 
storage space by individuals and companies 
is much larger than was first anticipated, 
and in view of this fact, award for the ma- 
chinery has been made with the understanding 
that the coal storage pile will be increased 
in width from 250 to about 300 feet. The 
length may be increased later from 1,700 to 
2,000 feet, if it is found practicable. The 
other principal elevations and dimensions to 
which the Cristobal plant will conform are, 
as follows: Elevation of extreme low water, 
one foot below mean sealevel; of extreme 
high water, 1.65 feet above mean sealevel; 
elevation of bottom of slip alongside wharves, 
41 feet below mean sealevel; elevation of 
bottom of wet coal pile, 19 feet below mean 
sealevel; assumed elevation of top of wet coal 
pile and bottom of normal dry coal pile, 
one foot above mean sealevel; elevation of 
top of normal dry coal pile, 21 feet above mean 
sealevel; elevation of top of emergency dry 
coal pile, 31 feet above mean sealevel; eleva- 
tion of decks of wharves, 10 feet above mean 
sealevel. 

Unloading towers — The unloading towers 
at the two plants will be similar in general 
construction. Their functions will be to mine 
coal from vessels and deposit it into the hop- 
per built in the tower, whence it may be de- 
livered through chutes to the conveying sys- 
tem, or to cars; to mine coal from vessels 
and deposit it by bucket into the storage pile 
behind the tower; to mine coal from storage 
pile behind the tower and deposit it into the 
hopper, and to mine coal from the storage 
pile behind the tower and deposit it by 
bucket on board vessels. The "normal rated 
capacity" of each tower will be 250 tons of 
coal an hour, and the maximum rate. 300 tons 
an hour, when unloading trom colliers or 
barges. 

The towers will be of steel construction, 
steam-driven, self-contained, and self-pro- 
pelling. Each unit will travel on two parallel 
pairs of rails laid at the elevation of the decks 
of the unloading wharves and spaced on 30- 
foot centers at Balboa, and 35-foot centers at 
Cristobal. There will belaid between the pairs 
of rails, also at the level of the decks of 
the unloading wharves, a single 5-foot gage 
railroad track, suitably located for the re- 
ception of coal from the tower hopper. 
Each tower will be supported by four trucks 
of four wheels each, and the minimum speed 
of travel will be 50 feet per minute. The 
towers will be equipped with buckets of 100 
cubic feet capacity each, and a receiving hop- 
per, 12 feet wide and 30 feet long, with a 
capacity of 50 tons of coal, into which the 
buckets will discharge, either in unloading 
from vessels, or reloading from storage pile. 



The trolley movement of the buckets will be 
actuated by two direct-connected steam en- 
gines installed at each plant. The body of 
of the hopper will be made of |-inch iron 
plates, with the top edges protected by an 
8"x8" coaming of white oak, and will be pro- 
vided with the necessary gates, chutes, etc., 
to deliver coal to the conveying system, and 
to the cars on the track beneath the tower. 
The boom, or apron, on the water side ot che 
towers will be capable of lifting or folding by 
movement in a vertical plane, so that when 
fully housed, no part of it will project more 
than four feet beyond the concrete face of the 
wharf. 

Stocking and reclaiming bridges — The stock- 
ing and reclaiming bridges at the Cristobal 
plant will be of the duplex type, that is, each 
bridge will be equipped with two buckets; at 
Balboa, the four Pacific Division berm cranes 
will be reerected and used as stocking and 
reclaiming bridges. Each bridge will be 
of steel construction throughout, electrically 
operated and self-propelling. Each will travel 
at a speed of not less than 50 feet per minute 
on two pairs of rails, each pair supported by a 
concrete and steel structure adjacent to the 
storage basin, and will be mounted on eight 
trucks, each truck to have four pairs of wheels. 
Each bucket will be of 200 cubic feet capacity, 
and will be capable of reclaiming, singly or 
together, coal from any depth of the wet, nor- 
mal dry, and emergency stock piles. Their 
hoisting and trolleying movements will be con- 
trolled, simultaneously or independently, by 
electric motors. The functions of these 
bridges consist in stocking coal into any part 
of the storage pile by means of a part of the 
conveying system supported by the bridge; 
of reclaiming coal from any part of the storage 
pile and delivering it to the conveyor; and 
of stocking and reclaiming simultaneously. 
They will be able to stock, or reclaim, at the 
rate of 1,000 tons an hour. 

Reloaders — The reloaders will be nearly 
identical at both plants; they are of steel con- 
traction throughout, electrically operated, and 
self-propelling. Their function is to receive 
coal from the conveying system and deliver 
it to colliers, barges, and other vessels of vary- 
ing freeboard and size, and location of hatch- 
es. To attain this end, each reloader is to be 
fitted with a hopper for the reception of coal 
from the conveying system of sufficient size to 
regulate the flow; a conveying system to trans- 
fer the coal to the discharge end of the re- 
loader, and an adjustable arm, or boom, 
equipped with a telescopic chute to deliver the 
coal. Each reloader will travel on rails laid 
at the elevation of the decks of the reloading 
wharves, and will have a "normal rated ca- 
pacity" of 500 tons an hour. The boom will 
house similarly to the boom on the unloading 
towers. 

Conveying system — A conveying system is 
provided for the transportation of coal within 
the plant, namely, from unloaders to storage; 
from unloaders to reloaders; from storage to 
wharf bunker; from unloaders to wharf 
bunker; from storage to reloaders, and from 
one part of storage to another. With this 
system at Cristobal, it will be possible to re- 
ceive coal simultaneously from two vessels 
located anywhere along the unloading wharf, 
one, two or three unloaders being at work 
on one vessel, and transport it from both 
vessels to the same part of the storage 
pile; to the reloaders direct, or to the wharf 



September 10, 1913. 



THE CANAL RECORD 



21 



bunker direct, within the capacity of the 
conveyors supplying the bunker. If coal 
from both vessels is being transported to 
the storage pile, it will be possible to re- 
claim coal simultaneously from any other 
part of the storage pile by means of the re- 
maining bridge, and transport it to the 
reloaders, or wharf bunker, direct. The con- 
veying will be accomplished by a double- 
track 10-ton automatic electric car system. 

Wharf bunkers — Each plant will be provided 
with a wharl bunker, appro.ximately 20 feet 
wide and lOJ feet long, for the supplying of 
coal to tugs, barges, and other small craft. 
Each bunker will have a capacity of 1,500 
tons of coal, and will be constructed of struc- 
tural steel, with floors and walls of concrete. 
It will be divided by two transverse partitions 
into three bins of 500 tons capacity each. 
The slope of the floor will be -15 degrees from 
the horizontal, but all sides and partitions will 
be vertical. Each bin will be provided with 
two valves for delivery of coal to barges, each 
having a clear opening 24 inches wide by 36 
inches nigh, and so spaced as to make the bin 
self-emptying. Each opening will be set 28 
feet above the deck of the wharf, and will be 
controlled by a gate operated from the ground 
or from a footwalk along the front of the 
bunker. Each outlet will be provided with a 
folding chute, able to deliver coal at the 
Cristobal plant, when fully extended, on a 
plane seven feet below wharf level, and at 
Balboa, 20 feet below wharf level. At its 
shortest extension, it must deliver coal at 
Cristobal on a plane .seven feet above wharf 
level, and at Balboa, 10 feet above wharf level. 
Each of the three bins will be fitted with a 
second chute, designed to discharge coal at a 
point five feet above the deck of the wharf, 
fitted with a valve at the lower end to control 
the flow. 

Power substatioyi and distribution system — 
The operation of all parts of both plants, with 
the exception of the unloading towers, will be 
electrical, and suitable substations of ap- 
proved design, will be erected at each point. 
The electrical apparatus will be furnished by 
the General Electric Compay as subcontract- 
or. The operation of the unloading towers 
will be actuated by steam power, for which 
engines and boilers will be supplied by the 
contractor. 

Weighing devices — Each of the weighing 
devices shall automatically record net weight 
of coal, in so far as practicable. Where 
the location and service of any weighing de- 
vice is such as to render it impracticable to 
weigh automatically, the nearest approach to 
automatic action possible, consistent with 
convenience, cost, and accuracy, shall be em- 
ployed; in any event, all weighing devices 
shall record the weights automatically, net 
weights where practicable, and where not 
practicable, the taking out of the tare shall be 
effected by simple, reliable, and accurate 
means. All weighing devices shall weigh 
within one per cent of absolute accuracy 
under ma.\imum or minimum conditions of 
operation, and they shall be such as to re- 
quire but little attention to keep them in 
efficient operating condition, shall be thor- 
oughly protected from dust, grit, and mois- 
ture, shall be so located as not to be injured 
by falling coal, or otherwise, and shall not 
require the services of a skilled man to ob- 
serve and record their weighings. 

AH weighing devices shall be of such design, 
location, and construction as to render it 



practicable to check their records by means 
of passing known weights, separate weighing 
on other scales of coal weighed by them, or 
otherwise, and such means of checking shall 
not require undue time or skill. If any de- 
vices for checking weights are made as or- 
dinary commercial adjuncts of the weighing 
devices, they shall be furnished and erected 
as part thereof. 

Hubstructures — The forces of the Canal 
Commission will undertake the erection of all 
masonry substructures for the coal handling 
machinery, as well as accomplisn all wet and 
dry excavation, masonry, and backfill for the 
plants in general; also, supply all rails for the 
support of the unloading towers, bridges, re- 
loaders, conveyors, and other accessories; 
all foundations, including anchor bolts and 
masonry plates, and, practically all the con- 
crete construction and fixed an(?horages. The 
substructures will be of solid masonry, sup- 
ported by 6-inch caissons sunk to rock. 
Forces of the Panama railroad are now en- 
gaged in establishing rail connection to the 
island opposite Cristobal, on which the coal- 
ing plant will be located, by means of a 
bridge of the bascule type. 

BALBOA COALING PLANT. 

This plant will be secondary in importance 
to the plant at Cristobal, and its storage 
capacity and facilities for handling will be 
about one-half of those of the main plant. 
Two plans for the handling machinery were 
prepared, one calling for entirely new equip- 
ment, and the other providing for the utiliza- 
tion of the four berm cranes at Miraflores 
Locks, which cost originally about $300,000. 
The last mentioned plan was adopted, and is 
the basis upon which the award tor the hand- 
ling plant at Balboa was made. 

The principal dimensions and elevations 
to which the Balboa plant will conform are, as 
follows: Elevation of extreme low water, 10.6 
feet below mean sealevel; elevation of ex- 
treme high water, 11.2 feet above mean sea- 
level; elevation of bottom of slip, 45 feet be- 
low mean sealevel; assumed elevation of top 
of wet coal pile and bottom of normal dry coal 
pile, six feet above mean sealevel; elevation 
of top of normal dry coal pile, 26 feet above 
mean sealevel; elevation of top of emergency 
dry coal pile, 36 feet above mean sealevel; 
elevation of decks of wharves, 16.5 feet above 
mean sealevel; length of storage basin, 500 
feet; water frontage, 1,300 feet. 

The storage facilities will consist of the 
following: 

Tons. 

Wet storage. reser\'ed for naval use J 00,000 

Dry storage, lor Canal use 80.000 

Emergency storage, dry 30.000 

Total 210,000 

The fundamental difference between the 
two plans prepared for the Balboa plant lies 
in the fact that in the design for all new equip- 
ment, the storage basin would be commanded 
by stocking and reclaiming bridges, while in 
the accepted design, it will be commanded by 
the four double cantilever cranes, and in this 
system no provision is made for connecting 
the unloading towers with the storage pile. 
The adoption of the alternative plan has 
necessitated an increase in the width of the 
storage basin to 340 feet, but its length, 500 
feet, remains the same. Under the present 
plan, it is purposed to load coal into storage 
by chuting from the unloading towers directly 
into the coal pile behind, to be rehandled fur- 
ther by the cranes. The conveying system 



will be required to serve not only the two 
unloading towers when reclaiming from stock, 
but the cranes also, when they are engaged in 
this operation, the capacity of 1,000 tons of 
coal an hour being obtained with all six units 
at work. The guaranteed rate of handling at 
Balboa is the same per unit as at Cristobal. 
The cost of removing and rcerecting the cranes 
will be borne by the Canal Commission. 

In adapting the steam-driven steeple tower 
of the Hunt Construction Company's de- 
sign to the proposed conveying system at the 
two plants, the addition of two 2-valve hop- 
pers on the shore side of the Cristobal plant, 
and of one 2-valve hopper on the shore side 
of the Balboa plant will be necessary. 

♦ 

Health Conditions in tlie Cliagres River Villages. 

Dr. Charles A. Hearne, quarantine officer 
at Colon and Cristobal, who visited the na- 
tive villdge of San Juan on the Rio Pequeni, 
one of the principal branches of the Chagres, 
on August 25 and 26, to investigate the re- 
ported heavy mortality among the inhabit- 
ants, has advised that in the village itself 
there has been no abnormal number of deaths. 
The police report, covering the period from 
October 1, 1912, to about September 1- this 
year, showed 28 births and eight deaths, out 
of a population of about 400. Two cases of 
sickness were found, both showing evidences 
of malarial infection. The sanitary conditions 
in the village were found to be fair; no mos- 
quitoes were seen or heard, and the people 
claim there are none. On the return trip, 
the doctor visited and inspected the following 
river villages: Maraiial, population 20; 
Limon, population 25; Boca de Gatun, popu- 
lation 40; Santa Rosa, population 20; Juan 
Mina, population 40; and Cruces, population 
now about 100. Hookworm disease was 
found to be prevalent in all of the settle- 
ments. 

The towns along the Chagres River are in- 
creasing in population, owing to removals 
from Gorgona, Matachin, and Cruces. The 
inhabitants of the latter place are preparing 
to found a new town, near the Canal Com- 
mission's gaging station at El Vigia, which 
they propose to name Vigia. With the rise 
of Gatun Lake, and the backing up of the 
water in the Chagres, the river is probably 
destined to become quite an artery of trade. 
Heretofore, bananas, in which a thriving 
trade is conducted, have been unloaded at 
Matachin, but the interuption in railroad 
communication to that point has caused 
the trade to be diverted to Gamboa and 
Gatun. It is not an infrequent sight to see 
iS or 40 cayucos heavily loaded with bananas 
coming down the river, trailing one behind the 

other. 

♦ 

A Sailor Slabbed. 

Arthur Rahlin, a sailor on the United 
States cruiser Denver, which arrived at Bal- 
boa from Corinto, Nicaragua, on Thursday, 
September -4, for coal, was stabbed in the 
Cocoa Grove district of Panama City, early 
in the morning of Saturday, September 6. 
He was taken to Ancon Hospital, where his 
condition is reported as critical. His assail- 
ant, a Panamanian named Juan Antonio 
Almengor, was placed under arrest. 

Married. 

ROBERTSON-JONES— At the Union Church. Cris- 
tobal, on September S, Miss Minnie Hudson Jones of 
Louisville. Ky.. to William Turner Robertson, of Wash- 
ington, D. C, the Rev. Carl H. Elliott ofiiciating. 
Canal Zone residence, Coroial. 



22 



THE GANAL RECORD 



Vol. VII, No. 3. 



SOCIAL LIFE OF THE ZONE. of raising money for the support of this teach- 



Meetin2 of Women to Discuss a Centra! Organi- 
zation for Local Cliurch Work. 

There was a large gathering of women at 
the seawall Methodist Episcopal Church in 
Panama, on Saturday, September 6, in re- 
sponse to a call issued by the Woman's 
Foreign Missionary Society of the church for 
a missionary rally. The object of the meeting 
was to bring together the women engaged in 
Christian work, especially missionary work, 
in the Canal Zone, and to discuss plans for the 
organization of a central society for the con- 
tinuance of such work. There were present 
members of the Ladies' Aid Society, Empire, 
St. Luke's Altar Guild, Ancon, and Ancon 
Study Club, besides women not affiliated with 
any organization. 

The program was begun with an organ 
voluntary by Mrs. Keyser of Ancon; fol- 
lowing this, 12 little children of the mission 
school gave a series of recitations, songs, and 
dialogues. Other numbers included a dra- 
matic reading by Mrs. Taylor of Empire, a 
reading by NLrs. Smith of Empire, prayer 
by Mrs. Stokoe of Balboa, and an address of 
welcome by IVIrs. Kingsbury of Ancon. Dr. 
Rosalie Slaughter Morton of New York City 
was present and spoke informally on the work 
of the Methodist church in the countries of 
South America through which she has been 
traveling. The president of the society, Mrs. 
Harry Compton, read a paper on the aims and 
outlook of the organization, some of the lead- 
ing points of which were, as follows: 

The Woman's Foreign Missionary Society 
is affiliated with the Baltimore branch of the 
woman's society of the Methodist church. 
The yearly dues of $1, and the receipts from 
life memberships, are sent to the branch. All 
other funds are expended in support of 
scholarships in the local mission school, and 
for the society's expenses. In 1912, the 
society paid SlOO toward the education of a 
young girl. The effort so far this year has 
been centered in the establishment of a play- 
ground in the school yard. The equipment 
is being made and will cost the society about 
S60. One of the youngest children in the school 
has been made a life member of the Little 
Light Bearers, the children's branch of the 
Woman's Foreign Missionary Society; such 
a membership costs SIO. A feature of the 
work of the society is the monthly mission 
study. Meetings have been held during the 
year at nine homes, and the social hour, fol- 
lowing the study and consideration of routine 
matters, has always proved pleasant. The 
women have held one public service in the 
church. In May, a reception was held in the 
church parlors in honor of Bishop Homer 
Stuntz, on the occasion of his first episcopal 
visit to the church. 

The enrollment of pupils in the mission 
school is over 100, and the average daily at- 
tendance is 90. Twenty scholarships, held by 
nine girls and eleven boys, are now main- 
tained. Lessons in manual training and sew- 
ing are features recently added to the work of 
the school. A cViss in first aid to the injured 
is also conducted. 

The president of the society announced that 
the new church in Guachapali will soon be 
completed, and urged the need of a woman 
teacher to take up the work among the women 
and children living in that section, one who 
tan make her home on the premises. The 
society was asked to consider the possibility 



A plan to bring the societies of women en- 
gaged in Christian work on the Isthmus into 
a central organization was discussed. Each 
society will be asked to appoint a committee 
to confer regarding the matter, and prepare 
suggestions for such an organization to be 
submitted at the meeting of the foreign mis- 
sionary society in October. After adjourn- 
ment, refreshments were served in the church 
parlors. 

Miscellaneous Notes. 

Mrs. James Bowdry of San Francisco, gave 
a lecture on socialism in the lodge hall, 
Paraiso on Saturday evening, September 6. 

The Reverend Alfred G. DeRoos, the 
Baptist evangelist, who has been holding 
meetings in various Zone villages, completed 
one month's mission under the direction of 
the Reverend J. L. Wise, in the Commission 
chapel at Empire on Saturday evening, Sep- 
tember 6. Eight persons presented them- 
selves for baptism at the close of the mission. 
Mr. DeRoos has gone to Gatun for a series 
of meetings under the direction of the pastor 
of the Baptist Church, the Reverend Stephen 
Witt. 



Special Meeting of Pythian Sisters. 

Canal Zone Temple, No. 1, Pythian Sisters, 
held a special meeting on Monday, September 
1, in honor of Mrs. Alice F. Boylan, supreme 
mistress of finance of the Supreme Temple. 
Ten members of the order were present. The 
Canal Zone Temple presented its visitor with 
a gavel made of native hardwood, and a pair 
of Satsuma cuff links as souvenirs of her visit 
to Panama. Mrs. Boylan sailed on the Car- 
tago, for Bocas del Toro on Tuesday, Sep- 
tember 2. 



PERSONAL. 

Capt. Courtland Nixon sailed for New 
York on the Panama, on Saturday, Sep- 
tember 6, on his annual leave of absence. 

Mr. Lewis A. Mason, assistant engineer 
in charge of the design of floating caisson 
dams for the lock entrances and the per- 
manent dry dock, sailed for San Francisco 
on September 4, accompanied by Mrs. Mason, 
to supervise the fabrication and construction 
of the first caisson by the Union Iron Works. 

Mr. B. F. Harrah, Assistant Examiner of 
Accounts of the Isthmian Canal Commission, 
with headquarters at Washington, arrived on 
the Isthmus, on Monday, September 1, on 
business connected with the office of the 
Examiner of Accounts. 

Mr. Charles M. Pepper, one of the foreign 
trade advisers for the Department of State 
at Washington, is spending a few days visiting 
the Canal work, which he has seen in various 
stages of progress, both in French and Ameri- 
can times. He e.xpects to retire from his 
present post on October 1. 



Emigrants from the Lake Area. 
In anticipation of the rise of Gatun Lake 
the Department of Law has been engaged for 
the past year and a half in removing from the 
area the native families, who live in detached 
houses scattered through the jungle, or in 
little villages clustered on the banks of 
streams or along the line of the railroad. 
In that time about 70 per cent of the popu- 
lation has moved out of the area, going either 
above the 87-foot contour or entirely out of the 



lake watershed. Some moved promptly on 
being notified, others had to be taken out 
when the water was almost at their doors; 
some have disappeared in the higher levels 
with the trackless silence of woods creatures; 
and some have moved in bodies, forming new 
settlements in which is preserved the com- 
munity life of the old. Most of the popula- 
tion of old Monte Lirio moved together up 
the Gatun River and founded a village which 
they call Limon. On the other hand, about 
350 people scattered over an area of several 
square miles were collected and moved, by 
rail and water, a distance of nearly 60 miles 
and set down on a townsite laid out for 
them. These were people living around 
Gorgona, Gorgonita, Waterloo, and Mata- 
chin, who were taken 40 miles down the 
Bay of 'Panama to the location of New Gor- 
gona, set apart for Canal Zone emigrants by 
the Government of Panama. 

A special train of four box cars and four 
second-class passenger cars carried these 
people and their belongings to Balboa, ma- 
king two separate trips. While the crowded 
passenger cars stood on a sidetrack near 
the "angle wharf," an electric crane at the 
wharf edge loaded the goods into the hold of 
a lighter. The lighter was 112 feet long by 40 
feet in beam, and the men of each party 
found room for passage on the deck. The 
women and children were carried aboard 
the tug Chame, which towed the lighter. 
In the vessel were loaded tables, kitchenware, 
sewing machines, alarm clocks, charcoal 
braziers, and other household goods; cor- 
rugated iron was carried along in quantities 
for roofing the new dwellings, and potted 
plants for adorning them. Several cayucos 
were taken aboard, and many chickens, 
ducks, geese, turkeys, pigs, and goats, as well 
as dogs and one spotted fawn, though no cats 
were to be seen. It was well toward evening 
each time when the barge left the wharf, 
on its way down the bay. The Chame re- 
turned to Balboa during the following night, 
having delivered the emigrants and their 
goods without miahap. 

At New Gorgona, the people were quartered 
temporarily in a single large building, erected 
by the Republic of Panama. With this as 
headquarters, they arranged new locations 
and set to work at constructing new dwellings, 
either of rough timber or of poles cut from the 
woods. The Government of Panama sells 
them building materials at cost, and is main- 
taining a commissary store at New Gorgona 
to supply food and household necessities at 
cost prices. The Republic has purchased 
from the Commission, at upset prices, the 
schoolhouse for native children and the Catho- 
lic church at Gorgona, and these, as well as 
the dwellings whose owners will dismantle 
and load them, are to be transported to New 

Gorgona free of charge. 

♦ 

Colon-Panama Passenger Train Service. 

Nos. 3, S, 7, 21, 23, 25, 27, and 29 will stop 
only at Miraflores and Corozal to allow pas- 
sengers to get off who hold transportation 
reading from points north of Pedro Miguel. 

Nos. 20, 22, 24, 26, and 28 will stop at 
Corozal and Miraflores on flag only for passen- 
gers going north of Pedro Miguel over new 

main line. 

♦ 

Lost — On Front street. Colon, on August 26, a 
gentleman's gold watch, Swiss movement, 16 size. 
Monogram "F. E. S." engraved in large letters on back. 
Fob attached with Society of the Chagres pin. Re- 
ward, if returned to John Vaucher, jeweler, Colon. 



September 10, 1913. 



THE CANAL RECORD 



23 



COMMISSION CLUBHOUSES. 



Activitlas of the Young Men's Christian Associa- 
tion. 

GENERAL. 

The schedule for moving picture entertainments for 
the week September 15 to 20. is, as follows: Monday, 
Empire; Tuesday, Culebra; Wednesday, Cristobal; 
Thursday. Corozal; Friday, Gatun and Porto Bello; 
Saturday, Cristobal. 

A cablegram has been received from Alton Packard, 
the humorist, stating that he will be unable to keep 
his engagement to appear at the various clubhouses 
in September, because of illness in his family. Ne- 
gotiations are now under way for a company.to appear 
early in October. 

The all- Isthmian bowling tournament and the all- 
Isthmian basketball league will begin about the first 
of October. 

COROZAL. 

A sharply contested basketball game took place on 
Friday night, September 5, between the Culebra and 
Corozal teams on the latters floor. The score at the 
end of the firpt half stood 22-13, in favor of Corozal. 
At the end of the second half, it was a tie. 28-28. Two 
additional five-minute periods were required to decide. 
The final score was 31-30, in favor of Culebra. 

Eight teams have entered the local three-men league 
of tenpins. Gold medals will be given to the winning 
team, also a gold medal for high average. 

Empire won three straight games from the local 
team on the local alleys on September 6. Scores: Em- 
pire. 869. 875.943; Corozal. 816, 856. 771. High scores 
in tenpins for the past week were, as follows; Edwards, 
2U. 205; Holmes, 213, 207; Taylor, 203; Beall. 200; 
Ruggles, 203. 

The chess match played between Culebra and Coro- 
zal resulted, as follows: 



Corozal. Won 

Connor 2 

Fields 1 

Sherrard li 

Shohan 

Mills 

Morehead I 

Kyte 2 

Kingsbury 2 



Culebra. Won 

DuBois 

A. M. Warner 1 

J. H. Warner \ 

McClure 1 

Wilson 2 

Strong 1 

Shropshire 

Patterson 



Total 9i Total 5 J 

Cin-EBRA. 

High scores for the week in tenpins were, as follows; 
Case. 200. 223; Dougherty. 269. 211; Finley. 228: 
Bechlem. 245. The score of 269 made by Doughtrty is 
the high record for the local alleys. In the local tourna- 
ment Dougherty and Warner are tied by Dougherty 
and case for the first prize, with a score of 740. 

An order has been placed in the United States for a 
consignment of new library books. 



The local bowling league has just closed with the 
three teams captained by S. King, Sims, and Giavelli 
tied for first place, each team having won 16 games and 
lost 8. The tie will be bowled off at once. 

New music rolls for the player piano have just arrived 
from the United States and those assembling in the 
lobby enjoy the concerts given two or three times a 
week. 

A local basketball league has been formed with five 
teams captained by Frank Purchase and C. Gushing of 
Culebra, and F. M. Sawyer, Huldqai?t, and A. J. 
Johnson of Empire. Two teams are composed of 
Culebra players, and the three other teams are formed 
of Empire men. This league will bring at least 30 
men into the game and in this way help to prepare a 
team for the regular Isthmian league, which will prob- 
ably start about the first of October. The local league 
series will be 20 games, each team playing the other 
teams twice, and two and three games will be played 
each night. 

GATUN. 

Mr. Joseph P. Mitchell has been appointed manager 
and coach for the Gatun basketball team. Practice 
games will be held three nights each week. Any mem- 
ber of the association is cordially invited to partici- 
pate in these practice games. 

A new schedule for the popular handicap pool tourna- 
ment has been drawn up and mailed to each participant. 
Any man who fails to appear by 9 o'clock on the night 
he is scheduled to play forfeits the game to his op- 
ponent. 

A two-man "Ragtime" bowling tournament was 
conducted on the Gatun alleys on Labor Day. Sep- 
tember 1. Twenty-five men participated. The results 
in the duckpin tournament were: First prize. Barte 
and Gibson, 200; second prize, Wursterand Grey, 198; 
third prize, Claherty and Furlong. 197; high single 
game, Barte, 114. The tenpin tournament results were; 
First prize. Dennis and Furlong, 411; second prize. 
Barte and Grover, 378; third prize, tie — Dennis and 



Humphrey, 343 and Omeara and Humphrey, 343. 
High single game, Dennis. 208. 

Mr. Ben Jenkins has been appointed a member of the 
Gatun executive council. 

A prize, consisting of a handsome silver medal, will be 
awarded to the member who rolls the largest number of 
"200" games of tenpins during the period September 17 
to September 30, inclusive. 

Messrs. Claherty and Hess have been appointed 
managers of the bowling alleys, effective September 1. 

All bowling records for the Gatun clubhouse were 
again broken during the month of August, when 3,693 
games were rolled. This is an average of 142 games per 
day. 

Chas. C. G. Wurster has been appointed manager of 
pool and billiards, vice D. C. Galloway, resigned. 

CRISTOBAL. 

Mr. Roy F. Soule of New York, editor of The Hard- 
ware Age, proved an interesting speaker before the dis- 
cussion club on Thursday. September 4. Mr. Soule 
divided his time between "Salesmanship" and "Cor- 
porations." About 50 men were present. Dr. S. T. 
Darling will address the club on Thursday, September 
11, taking for his subject "Transmission of disease 
through insects." 

Mr. D. V. Stratton will give a lecture illustrated with 
slides and moving pictures, on Friday, September 12. 
His subject will be "The Panama-Pacific exposition 
and the Sacramento Valley." No admission will be 
charged. 

Basketball practice has begun in preparation for the 
all-Isthmian tournament, which starts early in October. 
All men interested in basketball are requested to leave 
their names at the desk. 

Mr. J. B. Gomez will start another class in Spanish on 
Wednesday, September 17. Persons interested in the 
study of Spanish can enroll at this time. 



August Rainfall for Three Yeara. 


















f*i 
























> 

< 






Stations. 


1911 


1912 


1913 


o 
In 


o 
E 

s 

>* 


•a 


Pacific Section- 














Ancon 


7.21 


6.33 


8.20 


7.57 


17 


20 


Balboa 


8.50 


6.79 


6.74 


7.50 


15 


17 


Miraflores. . . . 


7.06 


11.35 


4.23 


8.21 


5 


17 


Pedro Miguel- 


5.43 


9.51 


5.46 


8.31 


6 


22 


Rio Grande.. . 


8.17 


13.19 


7.68 


10.04 


9 


26 


Central Section- 














Culebra 


8.36 


12.88 


9.76 


10.54 


22 


25 


Camacho 


7.98 


1.^.77 


10.13 


10.39 


8 


28 


Empire 


5.98 


10.53 


10.46 


9.79 


10 


25 


Gamboa 


7.68 


16.64 


16.45 


12.33 


31 


24 


Juan Mina. . . . 


12.88 


11 .04 


10.34 


11.42 


3 


23 


Alhajuela 


10.79 


12.87 


10.92 


12.94 


15 


24 


El Vigia 


12.56 


14.96 


10.24 


12.80 


5 


24 






13.63 
7.68 


14.75 
13.39 


14.19 
11.63 


2 
6 


27 


Trinidad 


8.17 


27 


Monte Lirio... 


9.58 


S.15 


10.42 


11.02 


6 


19 


Atlantic Section- 














Gatun 


7.91 


11.98 


12.32 


14.09 


8 


23 


Brazos Brook.. 


12.19 


14.42 


16.93 


14.96 


8 


24 


Colon 


11.60 


9.87 


17.91 


15.08 


43 


26 


Porto Bello . . . 


22.56 


14.15 


25.35 


18.93 


6 


22 



Acting Deputy Collector of Revenues. 

» Ancon. C. Z., September 3. 1913. 

Circular No. 114: 

To Heads of Divisions — Mr. James J. Gilbert, post- 



office inspector, is designated acting deputy collector 
of revenues, effective this date, vice Mr. Arthur Mc- 
Gowan, resigned. Richard L. Metcalfe. 

Head of Department of Civil Administration. 



Rainfall, August 1 to August 31. 1913. Inclusive. 



Stations. 


c 

ii 

y, c 


Q 


l-i 

(2- 


Pacific Section — 

Ancon 

Balboa 


ItlS. 
2.61 
2.06 
1.04 
1.10 
1.26 

2.17 
2.13 
1.86 
3.31 


17 
17 
10 
10 

12 

23 
23 
6 
17 
23 
8 
6 
6 
10 
6 

10 
10 

28 
10 


Ins. 
8.20 
6.74 
4.23 




5.46 


Rio Grande 

Central Stclion^ 

Culebra 


7.68 
9.76 


*Camacho 


10.13 




10.46 




16.45 


*J uan Mina 


1.94 
1.47 
1.37 
2.63 
2.83 
2.00 

3.04 
4.35 
4.55 
6.06 


10.34 
10.92 


*E1 Vigia 


ID "^4 




14.75 




13 39 


*Monte Lirio 


10.42 


Atlantic Section — 

Gatun 


12.32 
16 93 


Colon 


17.91 


Porto BeUo 


25.35 



Rainfall from September 1 to 6 1913, Inclusive. 



Pacific Section — - 

Ancon 

Balboa 

♦Miraflores 

Pedro Miguel. . . 

Rio Grande 

Central Section — 

Culebra 

*Camacho 

Empire 

Gamboa. 

*Juan Mina 

Alhajuela 

*E1 Vigia 

*Frijoles 

*Monte Lirio. . . 
Atlantic Section — 

Gatun 

*Brazos Brook. . 

Colon 

t Porto Bello. . .. 



I 

1 Ins. 




.36 


2 


.19 


2 


.57 


3 


.30 


2 


.34 


4 


.28 


1 


.18 


3 


.29 


,2 


.65 


6 


2.15 


6 


1.22 


3 


1.00 


6 


2.22 


5 


3.26 


5 


1.26 


5 


1.35 


5 


.64 


3 


1 .14 


1 



Ins. 
.41 
.25 
1.26 
.81 
.83 

.86 
.46 
.89 
1.68 
4.33 
2.94 
2.64 
4.11 
4.56 

2.07 

2.74 

1.93 

..>4 



*Standard rain gage — readings at 5 p. m.. daily. 
AutomaLic rain gage at unstarred stations — values 
midnight to midniglit. tTo 5 p. m., September 5. 



Tide Table. 

The following table shows the time of high and low 
tides at Panama for the week ending September 20, 1913; 



Date. 


Low 


High 


Low 


High 


Low 


Sept. 14 

Sept. 15 


A.M. 


A.M. 
3.17 
3.48 
4.17 
4.43 
5.11 
5.37 

6.08 


A.M. 
9.20 
9.55 
10.27 
10,58 
11.30 
12 00 
P.M. 
12.34 


P.M. 
3.33 
4.05 
4.33 
5.01 
5.29 
5.57 

6.28 


P.M. 
9.. '3 
10.07 


Sept. 16 




10.39 


Sept. 17 




11. 10 


Sept. 18 




11.38 


Sept. 19 

Sept. 20 


12.10 





75th meridian time. 



WEATHER CONDITIONS, CANAL ZONE. AUGUST, 1913. 



Weather conditions on the Isthmus during the month of August were in most respects approximately normal. 
The rainfall was generally deficient over the Pacific and Central sections, but above normal along the Atlantic coast. 
The monthly totals ranged from 4.23 inches at Miraflores to 25.35 inches at Porto Bello. The maximum precipita. 
tion recorded in one day was 6.06 inches at Porto Bello, on the 10th. 

The average air temperature and relative humidity were slightly above normal. 

The wind reached a maximum velocity of 40.miles an hour from the northeast, at Culebra, on the 27th during a 
local rain squall. The highest wind velocity previously recorded at the Culebra station was 39 miles an hour, from 
the north, on July 20, 1910, 

Normal conditions of night and early morning fogginess prevailed at the interior stations. Fifty-four per cent 
of the fogs observed were dissipated by 6.30 a. m.. 88 per cent by 7.30 a. m., and 94 per cent by 8,30 a, m. 

The following table summarizes the weather conditions for the month: 





73^ 


Temperature. 


> . 
•S3 


Precipitation, 


Wind. 


Stations. 


1 


E 

a 


i) 


5 

3 

a 
I 


flj 


JS 

a 
"{3 


c . 
.2 ai 


•s-S 


is 

ira 


4 


Ii 

Se 


d 

o 

1 






0. 


s 


s 



Aug. 3 


'4 


D 


S 


H 


2 


H 


c 


i; 


Q 


Q 


Colon 


29.346 


79.8 


87 


72 


Aug,21 


89 


17.91 


15.08 


26 


7,013 


W. 


26 


W. 


Aug. 10 


Culebra 


29.828 


79.7 


9Z 


Aug, 1 


70 


Aug. 7 


94 


9.76 


10.54 


25 


4,588 


N. W, 


40 


N. E. 


Aug. 27 


Ancon 


29.816 


80.2 


93 


AUE,13 


70 


Aug. 7 


91 


8.20 


7.S7 


2U 


4,640 


N. W. 


22 


S. E. 


Aug. 21 



24 



THE CANAL RECORD 



Vol. VII, No, 3. 



OFFICIAL DIRECTORY OF PANAMA. 

President — Dr. Belisario Porras. 
First vice-president — Rodolfo Chiari. 
Second vice-president — Ramun M. Valdes. 
Third vice-president — Aristides Arjona. 

Departments of National Government. 
Secretary of Government and Justice — Francisco Filos. 

Assistant Secretary — Enrique L. Hurtado. 
Secretary of Foreign Affairs — Ernesto T. Lefevre. 

Assistant Secretary — Jose B. Calvo. 
Secretary of Finance — Aristides Arjona. 

Assistant Secretary — Leovigildo Gonzales. 
Secretary of Public Works — Ram6n F. Acevedo. 

Assistant Secretary — Ladislao Sosa. 
Secretary of Public Instruction — Guillermo Andreve. 

Assistant Secretary — Jephtha B. Duncan. 
Director General of Posts and Telegraphs— L. F. 

Ramirez. 
Director General of Statistics — Adolfo Aleman. 
Administrator General of Public Lands — Jeronimo J. 

Garcia. 
Treasurer General (ad interim) — J. M. Alzamora. 
Chief Engineer — Ricardo M. Arango. 



Minister at Washington — Eusebio A. Morales. 
Secretary of Legation— Jose E. Lefevre. 
Attache — Nicolas Remon. 



Judiciary. 

Chief Justice of the Supreme Court — Alberto Mendoza. 
Judges of the Supreme Court — H. Patino. Alberto 

Mendoza, Saturnino L. Perigault, Aurelio 

Guardia. Juan Lombardi. 
Attorney General — Antonio Papi Aizpuru. 

Governors of Provinces. 

Panama — Francisco A. Mata. 

Colon — Ruben S. Arcia. 

Bocas del Toro — Pacifico Melendez P. 

Code — Alfredo Patiiio. 

Los Santos — Jose M. Moreno. 

Verasuas — A. Gilberto Vega. 

Chiriqui — Gerardo Herrera. 

Municipalities of Panama and Colon. 
Panama — Mayor (Alcalde) — Enoch Adames. 

Chief of Police — Leonidas Pretelt. 

Captain of the Port — Carlos de Diego. 
Colon — Mayor (Alcalde) — Julio Bernal. 

Chief of Police— C. A. Matos. 

Captain of the Port — Inocencio Galindo, Jr. 



List of the Diplomatic and Consular Corps Ac- 
credited to the Government of the Re- 
public of Panama. 

AUSTRIA-HUNGARY. 

Colon— Frank Ullrich. Consul. 

BELGIUM. 

Guatemala — H. Henin. Minister Resident. 
Panama — B. D. Fidanque, Consul (absent). Mauri- 
cio B. Fidanque. Consul (acting). 
Colon — J. J. Henriquez, Vice-Consul. 

BOLIVIA. 

Panama — Samuel Boyd, Consul-General. 
Colon — Isidoro Hazera. Consul (acting). 

BRAZIL. 

Havana, Cuba — Luis Guinaraes. Charge d'Affaires. 
Panama — Ramon Arias F., Consul. 

CHILE. 

San Jose. Costa Rica — C. Vergara Clark, Envoy 
Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary. 

Panama — Antonio B. Agacio, Charge d'Affaires. and 
Consul-General (absent). Juan Ehrman. Consul. 

Colon — Ernesto Jaramillo Aviles. Consul. 

CHINA. 

Panama — Owyang King, Consul-General. 

COSTA RICA. 

Panama — Humberto M. Vaglio. Consul-General. 
Bocas del Toro — Victor M. Dominguez, Consul. 

CUBA. 

Panama — R. GuiterrCz Alcaide. Charge d'Affaires. 
and Consul-General (absent). Mario F. de Lara, 
in charge of Legation and Chancellor in Charge. 

Colon — Luis F. Estenoz. Consul. 

DENMARK. 

Panama — L L. Maduro. Consul. 
Colon — Joseph Fidanque. Vice-Consul. 

ECUADOR. 

Panama — J. Cueva Garcia. Minister Resident. 
Victoriano Endara. Consul- 

PRANCE. 

Panama — L. Thublier, Charge d'Affaires (ad interim). 
And Acting Consul. 

Colon — M. H. (ii* Jus^ien de Seuevier. Vice-Conaul. 
Bocas del Toro — E. Cocher. Consular Agent. 
David — Eugene Loeffler, Vice-Consul. 



GERMANY. 

Panama — Arturo KOhpcke. Consul. 
Colon — Alfred Sange. Consul. 

GRE.A.T BRITAIN. 

Panama — C. C. Mallet. Minister Resident. Perci- 
vale Helyar, Vice-Consul. E. S. Humber, Pro-Consul. 

Colon— H. O. Chalkley. Consul (absent). James 
Robertson Murray, Vice-Consul. William McAdam. 
Pro-Consul. 

Bocas del Toro — William H. Ponton. Vice-Consul. 

GREECE. 

Panama — Florencio Arosemena. Consul. 

GUATEMALA. 

Panama— J. F. Arango, Consul-General. 
Colon — Vincentej.Delgado. Consul. 

HAITI. 

Colon — Jules Faine, Consul-General. 

HONDURAS. 

Panama — Marcos E. Velazquez, Consul-General. 

ITALY. 

Panama — Arturo Kdhpcke, Consul. 
Colon — L. Delpiano. Consular Agent. 

MEXICO. 

Panama — Francisco Mallen, Consul-General. Baldo- 
mero Mendez. Vice-Consul. 

Colon — Inocencio Galindo, Vice-Consul. 

THE NETHERLANDS. 

Panama — D. M. Sasso, Consul. 
Colon — J. J. Ecker. Sr., Vice-Consul. 

NICARAGUA. 

Panama — Marcos E- Velazquez. Charge d'Affaires. 
Julio Arjona Q., Consul. 

Bocas del Toro — Solomon H. Conoan. Consul. 

NORWAY. 

Mexico City^Michael Strom Lie. Consul-General. 
Panama — George Myers Guerin. Vice-Consul. 
Colon — David S. Webster. Consul. Eustace H. 
Simons, Vice-Consul. 

Bocas del Toro— H. F. W. Kandler, Vice-Consul. 

PERU. 

Panama — Emilio Rodriguez Larrain, Charge d'Af- 
faires. and Consul-General. Alberto Obarrio, Consular 
Agent. 

Colon— H. R. VVilford. Consul. 

PORTUGAL. 

Guatemala — Jose d.i Costa Carneiro. Charge d'Af- 
faires. and Consul-General. 

Panama — Raaion Arias F., Consul. 

SALVADOR. 

Panama — Ernesto Boyd, Consul-General (acting). 

SANTO DOMINGO. 

Panama — Arturo de Lcmos. Consul. 
Colon — Jose M. Fidanque. Vice-Consul. 

SPAIN. 

Panama — Jose Teixidor y Jugo, Consul. Narciso 
Perez Petinto. Vice-Consul. 

Colon — Antonio Andrade Polanco, Consul. 

Santiago. Veraguas — Juho Garcia Sierra. Vice-Con- 
aul. 

SWEDEN. 

Panama — B. Malo. Consul. 

Colon — J. J. Ecker. Sr.. Vice-Consul. 

UNITED STATED OF AMERICA. 

Panama — H. Percival Dodge. Envoy Extraordinary 
and Minister Plfnipotentiary (absent). Cyrus F. 
Wicker, Charge d'Affaires (ad interim). Alban G. 
Snyder, Consul-General. Daniel J. Waters, Vice-Con- 
sul. 

Colon — 'J. C. Kellogg, Consul. Robert Wilco.x. Vice- 
Consul. 

Bocas del Toro — Paul Osterhout, Consular Agent. 

David — William D. Gillespie. Consular Agent. 

Santiago. \'eraguas — Nathaniel J. Hill, Consular 
Agent . 

VENEZUELA. 

Colon — Angel Diaz Castro, Consul General. 



MOVEMENT OF OCEAN VESSELS. 



Stages of tne Cnagres. 

Maximum height of the Chagres River for the week 
ending midnight, Saturday, September 6. 1913. All 
heights are in feet above mean sealevel. 







Stations. 




Day and Date. 




1 


s 


c « 




Vigia. 


s 


i^ 






< 


o 


o 2 


Sun.. August 31 


129.6 


95.0 


6U.5 


80.4 


Mon.. September 1 


130.0 


95.3 


60.8 


60,6 


Tjps.. September 2. . . . 


128.4 


94.7 


60.8 


60.8 


Wed.. Spfitember 3 


128. 2 


94.4 


61.0 


60.9 


Thurs.. September 4. . . 


127.1) 


93.5 


61.2 


61. 1 


I-'ri., Septembar S 


127.2 


93.5 


61.6 


61.6 


Sat.. September 6 


128.3 


94.4 


61.8 


61.8 


Height of low water to 








nearest foot 


125.0 


91.0 


44.0 





The following is a list of sailbgs of the Panama 
Railroad Steamship Company; of the Royal Mail 
Steam Packet Company; of the Hamburg-American 
Line, and of the United Fruit Company s Line: 

NEW YORK TO CRISTOBAL. 

Advance P. R.R.. Tuesday Sept. 9 

Panama P. R. R.. Tuesday Sept. 16 

Allianca P. R.R.. Monday Sept. 22 

Colon P. R. R..Tuesday Sept. 30 

Advance P. R. R.. Monday Oct. 6 

Panama... P. R. R.. Saturday Oct. 11 

Allianca P. R. R.. Saturday Oct. 18 

Colon P. R.R.. Friday Oct. 24 

Advance P. R. R.. Thursday Oct. 30 

CRISTOBAL TO NEW YORK. 

Colon p. R. R.. Sunday Sept. 14 

Advance P. R. R.. Monday Sept. 22 

Panama P. R. R.. Sunday Sept. 28 

Allianca P. R. R.. Saturday Oct. 4 

Colon P. R.R.. Sunday Oct. 12 

Advance P. R. R. . Saturday Oct. 18 

Panama P. R. R.. Thursday Oct. 23 

Allianca P. R. R. . Thursday Oct. 30 

NEW YORK TO COLON. 

Santa Marta U. F. C. .Wednesday . .Sept. 3 

Carl Schmz H.-A.. .Saturday Sept. 6 

Pastores U. F. C. .Saturday Sept. 6 

Metapan U. F. C. .Wednesday . .Sept. 10 

Prinz August Wilhelm. H.-A Saturday Sept. 13 

Tivives U. F. C. . Saturday Sept. 13 

Trent R. M. . Saturday Sept. 13 

Zacapa U. F. C. .Wednesday . .Sept. 17 

Emil L. Boas H.-.'\ Saturday Sept. 20 

Sixaola U. F. C. . Saturday Sept. 20 

Almirante U. F. C. .Wednesday. .Sept. 24 

Prinz Joachim H.-A Saturday .... Sept. 27 

Carrillo U. F. C. . Saturday Sept. 27 

Magdalena R. M . . .Saturday. . . .Sept. 27 

Santa Marta U. F. C. . Wednesday . .Oct. 1 

COLON TO NEW YORK. 

Almirante U. !•. C. .Thursday.. .Sept. 11 

Prinz Joachim H.-A Tuesday Sept. 16 

Carrillo U. F. C. Tuesday Sept. 16 

Magdalena R. M.. . .Tuesday Sept. 16 

Santa Marta U. F. C. .Thursdaj Sept. IS 

Carl Schurz H.-A Tuesday Sept. 23 

Pastores U. F. C. . Tuesday Sept. 23 

Metapan U. F. C. .Thursday Sept. 25 

Danube R. M . . .Tuesday Sept. 30 

Tivives U. F. C. Tuesday Sept. 30 

Prinz August Wilhelm. H.-A Tuesday Sepi.. 30 

Zacapa U. F. C. Thursday Oct. 2 

Emil L. Boas H.-A Tuesday Oct. 7 

Sixaola U. F. C. Tuesday Oct. 7 

Almirante U. F. C. . Thursday Oct. 9 

Prinz Joachim H.-A ... . Tuesday Oct. 14 

Carrillo U. F. C. . Tuesday Oct. 14 

Tagus R. M. . .Tuesday Oct. 14 

NEW ORLEANS TO COLON. 

."Vtenas U. F. C. . Saturday Sept. 6 

Parismina U. F. C Wednesday . .Sept. 10 

Turrialba U. F. C. Saturday Sept. 13 

Cartago U. F. C. . Wednesday . .Sept. 17 

Abangarez U. F. C. . Saturday .... Sept. 20 

Heredia U. F. C. . Wednesday . . Sept. 24 

Atenas U. F. C. . Saturday Sept. 27 

COLON TO NEW ORLEANS. 

Abangarez U. F. C. . Thursday Sept. 1 1 

Heredia U. F. C. .Saturdav ....Sent. 13 

Atenas U. F. C. . Thursday Sept. 18 

Parismina U. F. C. , Saturday Sept. 20 

Turrialba U. F. C. Thursday Sept. 25 

Cartago U. F. C. , Saturday Sept. 27 



Misdirected Letters. 

The following insufficiently addressed letters, origi- 
natin.*; in the United States and its possessions, have 
been received in the office of the Director of Posts, 
and may be secured upon request of the addressees; 
Brady, Miss Esther Mehlhope, G. E. 

Brown, Frank H. Mettler. Mr^. A. J. 

Collins, E. T. Rawson. Frank 

Conelly, E. C. Rceder, Willie D. 

Elara, Robert Skeris, Joseph 

Gardner, Dean B. Smith, Mrs. Charles F. 

Hali, W, C. Swanson. Oscar 

Harold, W. Thompson. John 

Horgan, M. W. Van Fleet. Wilbur 

Marcuse, S. H. Van Toll. Nelson 



Cold Storage Prices. 

The following changes Iiave been made in cold stor- 
rage prices at the commissaries since the last publica- 
tion: Sweetbread, beef, reduced from 40 to 34 cents 
per pound; green peppers reduced from 6 to 4 cents 
per pound; roraaiue. added, at 14 cents per pound; 
tomatoes, reduced from 5 to 4 cents per pound; Mala- 
ga grapes, added, at 14 cents per pound; canteloupes, 
advanced to 7 cents per pound; plums, advanced to 
12 cents per pound; pears, added, at 8 cents per pound. 



CANAL 




RECORD 



Volume VII. 



ANCON, CANAL ZONE, WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 17, 1913. 



No, 4. 



The Canal Record 

Published weekly under the authority and supervision of 
the Isthmian Cayial Commission. 



Tke Canal Record is published free of charge, one copy 
each to all employes of the Commission and Panama 
Railroad Company whose names are on the gold roll. 
Extra copies and bark numbers can be obtained from the 
new stands of the Panama Railroad Company icrr five 
cents each. 



Address all Coimnunications. 

THE CANAL RECORD, 

Ancon, Canal Zone, 

Isthmus of Panama. 

No communicatioyi, either for publication or requesting 
information will receive attention unless signed with the 
full name a7td address of the writer. 

NOTES OF PROGRESS. 



Canal Record Index. 

The index to Volume VI of The Canal 
Record, in form suitable for binding, will be 
ready for distribution shortly. It will be sent 
free, on application, to such persons, institu- 
tions, libraries, etc., as desire to preserv'e their 
copies of The Canal Record in book form. 
Application should be made to the Secretary,^ 
Isthmian Canal Commission, Ancon, C. Z. 



Commissary for Ancon. 

In view of the decision to continue the 
settlement at Ancon indefinitely as quarters 
for the gold employes, a commissary of a per- 
manent character has been authorized. It 
will be a one-story building, 110 feet long 
by 70 feet wide, about the size of the Empire 
commissars-, will be constructed of hollow con- 
crete blocks, and will hav'e a tile floor in 
salesroom. A refrigerator, 20 by 20 feet 
in size, will be installed, together with the 
usual counters and shelves. The commissary 
will be situated near the tennis court, on the 
site of the old French building, now used as 
a storehouse by the Quartermaster's De- 
partment. The permanent force to be quar- 
tered at Ancon, will comprise about 161 
families, and 130 bachelors. 



Rise of Miraflores Lake. 

The opening in the dam of the spillway of 
Miraflores Lake is to be closed on or before 
October 1, in order to begin the filling of the 
lake area to the height required for the pas- 
sage of vessels. In the construction of the 
spillway, a gap was left in the lower part 
of the ogee next to the locks, for the passage 
of the waters of the Rio Grande and its 
tributaries; filling this gap with about 700 
cubic yards of concrete will effect the com- 
pletion of the mass masonry of the spillway. 
Forces of the First Division will complete the 
installation of the control gates before the 
water reaches the crest of the spillway at 
38.67 feet above sealevel. The rise of the 



lake will necessitate the removal of the 
cement shed on the west side the ap- 
proach to Miraflores Locks and of the 
branches of railroad below the 55-foot con- 
tour. The buildings in the native section of 
Miraflores village have been demolished, and 
the Commission buildings in the lake area will 
be removed. The police personnel was trans- 
ferred to Pedro Miguel and consolidated with 
the station of that village on September 15, 
and the Miraflores commissary store is closed. 
The bottom of the completed channel 
through the lake, from Pedro Miguel Lock 
to Miraflores Locks, is to be 10 feet above 
sealevel, allowing a waterway of 45 feet depth 
when the lake is at elevation 55 feet, or 
normal level. Most of this channel has been 
brought to grade, though some portions of it 
have been left with a ma.ximum elevation of 
16 feet above sealevel, to be excavated by 

dredges. 

^ 

Diversion of Drainage Soutli End of Culebra Cut. 

Since August 15, 1912, the drainage water 
from the portion of Culebra Cut south of 
the summit of excavation has been passed 
through the 18-fooc culvert in the middle 
wall of Pedro Miguel Lock. On Sep- 
tember 11, this drainage was diverted to 
the culvert in the east wall, to allow the 
cleaning from the center wall culvert of 
the silt and debris which have settled in it. 
This cleaning, which has to be accomplished 
before the rise of Miraflores Lake, will prob- 
ably require about 15 days. 



END OF DRY EXCAVATION. 



Rents under Revocable Licenses to Private Coal 
and Fuel Oil Companies. 

L'ndcr the plan of issuing revocable licenses 
to private dealers in coal and fuel oil who de- 
sire to maintain coal storage and oil tanks at 
the Canal termini, the following rates for rent- 
al have been approved: The rate for space 
occupied by oil tanks will be one-half of a 
cent per square foot per annum at Balboa, and 
one-third of a cent per square foot per annum 
at Mount Hope. The real estate or improve- 
ment tax on investments made by the fuel 
oil licensee will probably be one per cent 
per annum. Under the present arrangement, 
the licensee of coal storage will have little, 
if any, occasion to make improvements. 
WTiere the Government makes these im- 
provements, the ground rent and the rent 
for the improvements will be consolidated into 
one annual fee in lieu of the ground rental and 
the tax for improvements charged the licensee 
for fuel oil tanks. 



A Day's Record in Loading Gravel. 

American steam ditcher No. 1, belonging 
to the Panama Railroad Company, made a 
good day's record at dump Xo. 1 gravel pile 
on Saturday, September 6, when it loaded 
1,424: cubic yards of gravel in five hours and 
fifty-fivs minutes, approximating a rate of 
237 cubic yards an hour. The machine was 
in charge of Steam Engineer E. Richards, 



Steamshovel Operations in Canal Proper Dis- 
continued on September 10 — Cleaning 
up in the Cut, 

Steamshovel operations in Culebra Cut 
were permanently suspended on Wednesday, 
September 10, and by Saturday night, Sep- 
tember 13, all track had been removed in the 
Empire district, except Tower R incline 
track and track to pumping plant, and all 
were taken up in the Culebra district, except 
incline tracks. Many of the ties were past 
saving and were heaped in piles and burned. 

The last steamshovels to stop working in 
the bottom excavation were No. 204, manned 
by H. S. Hayes, engineer, and \. E. ."Mexander, 
craneman; and No. 226, manned by Albert 
H. Geddes, engineer, and W. 1. Hudson, 
craneman. These dug their last dipperfuls 
at about 10.30 a. m. The last dirt train out 
of the Cut was drawn by engine No. 260, with 
E. C. Bean as engineer, and E. A. Donnelly, 
as conductor. Steamshovel No. 210, manned 
by Frank Loulan, engineer, and S. H. Bryan, 
craneman, was retained at Cucaracha slide 
until Thursday, September 11, to keep the 
track clear. 

The pumps which have been maintained 
just south of Gamboa dike to free the Cut 
of drainage water flowing north will be re- 
moved this week, and the concrete building 
which has housed them will be destroyed with 
dynamite. As the pipes which formerly passed 
the water around Cucaracha slide to the 
south have been taken up, the natural drain- 
age into the Cut from this week on will col- 
lect and remain there. As the water in the 
lake rises there is an increased seepage through 
the embankment separating the Cut from the 
Camacho Diversion, and. in addition, a slight 
seepage through Gamboa dike has been ob- 
served. This, together with the rainwater 
that will flow in between now and the time the 
valves in the pipes at Gamboa dike are opened, 
will probably have the effect of flooding 
the bottom of the Canal. In order to avoid 
any hindrance by the water backing up too 
rapidly while the work of removing the pumps 
is going on, a small dike will be built across the 
Canal about a mile south of the dike to retain 
the drainage flowing north. With the pumps 
out of the way, the spur track leading to the 
dike, and the incline track out of the Cut near- 
by, will be removed. 

It is estimated that 600,000 cubic \ ards of 
material remain to be removed by dredges 
from the Culebra Cut section within the 
original limits of the Canal, exclusive of slides 
and the inclines at the north and south ends 
of the Cut. Practically all of this material 
lies between Cucaracha slide and a point 
about midway between Empire and Culebra. 
Slides in this section showed rene^ved activity 
during the past week, but these in a large 
measure have lost their importance, because 
they will become a part of the regular work 



26 



THE CANAL RECORD 



Vol. VII, No. 4. 



of the dredges in keeping the channel clear. 
The remaining material is being drilled pre- 
paratory to blasting it; most of the blasting 
will be done after the water is about eight 
feet deep. 

A total of 13 shovels were at work on 
Saturday in the Central Division. Two of 
these were engaged in excavating a recess for 
a mooring basin and an approach for the 
pontoon bridge on the east bank, and one was 
at work on the west bank, opposite Cucaracha 
village, digging a trench for the discharge line 
of the dredge pumps to be installed at that 
point. It is proposed to extend the discharge 
line over into the valley of the Rio Grande, 
where the material pumped by the dredges 
working in Cucaracha slide, will be wasted. 
Another shovel will be set at work this week, 
excavating for a track leading off the west 
approach to the pontoon bridge. 

Excavation was first begun in Culcbra Cut 
on January 20, 1882, by the French, and has 
continued with only six years' interruption 
(1889-1895) to the present time. During the 
operations of the two French companies, 
about 17,000,000 cubic yards of material were 
taken from this section useful to the com- 
pleted Canal. On May 4, 1904, when the 
Americans took charge, there were about 700 
men employed in excavation work, using 
side excavators, served by small French dump 
cars and Belgian locomotives. Work was 
continued with the equipment left by the 
French until it could be gradually replaced 
with modern steamshovels, engines, and cars. 
The first American steamshovel was placed 
in operation on November 11, 1904, and the 
last of the French excavators was discontinued 
on June 16, 1905. On August 1, 1905, there 
were eleven American steamshovels at work, 
but their output was greatly handicapped by 
lack of proper transportation facilities. Work 
in the Cut did not begin on a large scale until 
February, 1907, and from that time until 
1911, when the maximum output was reached, 
there was a steady increase in the amount 
of material excavated as new equipment was 
installed. 

The following table shows the amount of 
material removed from the Culebra Cut sec- 
tion by the Americans from the beginning 
of operations in 1904 up to the suspension of 
steamshovel work on September 10: 
Year. Cubic Yards. 

1904 243,472 

1905 1,084.428 

1906 2.702,991 

1907 9,177.130 

1908 13,912,453 

1909 14,557.034 

1910 15,398.599 

1911 16,596,891 

1912 15,028,413 

1913 (To September 10) 8,348, 190 

Total 97,049,601 

♦ 

Canal Excavation In August. 

The grand total of excavation to September 
1 was 209,218,030 cubic yards, leaving to be 
excavated under the revised estimate of July 
I, 1913, 23,134,970 cubic yards. 

The total excavation for the month of 
August was 2,658,785cubic yards, as compared 
with 2,443,353 cubic yards for the corre- 
sponding month last year, and 2,706,223 cubic 
yards, in August, 1911. The wet excavation 
for the month was 1,607,672 cubic yards, and 
the dry excavation 1,051,113 cubic yards. 

In the Atlantic section, the total excavation 
was 514,250 cubic yards. Of this amount, all 
but 2,161 cubic yards consisted of material 
dredged from tie Atlantic entrance to the 



Canal by forces of the Sixth Division. 

The total excavation in the Central Divi- 
sion was 926,900 cubic yards, 83,200 cubic 
yards of which consisted of material removed 
in sluicing operations back of Gold Hill, per- 
formed by forces of the Fifth Division. Cen- 
tral Division shovels, working on the bottom 
of the Canal, in slides, and on the banks of 
the Canal in removing material to lessen the 
pressure from above, took out a total of 
810,100 cubic yards. In addition, 33,600 
cubic yards of material, charged to "Plant" 
e.'ccavation, were removed. 

In the Pacific section, operations by the 
Sixth Division resulted in the removal by 
dredges of 1,012,383 cubic yards, 726,256 
cubic yards from the Pacific channel, and 
286,127 cubic yards from the terminal basin. 
Dry excavation amounted to 205,252 cubic 
yards, 102,238 cubic yards from the terminal 
site, by forces of the Second Division, and 
103,014 cubic yards from the Canal prism, 
south of Miraflores Locks, by forces of the 
Fifth Division. 

A detailed statement of excavation, and a 
summary of the work on the locks and dams, 
follow: 

ATLANTIC DIVISION. 



LOCAUTY. 


"Work- 
Excava- 
tion. 


"Plant" 

Exes va- 

tion. 


Total 
Excava 

tion. 


Dry excavation — 
Locks, dam, and spiU- 


Cu. Yds. 
2,161 


Cu. Yds. 


Cu. Yds. 
2.161 


Mindi 




















Total 


2,161 




2.161 




Atlantic entrance 

Locks, dam, and spill- 


512,089 




512.089 


Terminal 
















Total 


512,089 




512.089 




Total wet and dry 
excavation 


5U.250 




514.250 



CENTRAL DIVISION. 



Dry excavation — 
Culebra Cut 


810,100 
83.200 


33.600 


843,700 
83,200 


Hydraulic excavation 






Total 


R9'.300 


.'3,600 


926.900 



PACIFIC DIVISION. 



Dry excavation — 
Locks, dams, and spill- 










90.134 
103,014 


12,104 


102.238 
103.014 


Prism 






Total 


193. US 


12.104 


205,252 




Pacific entrance 

Miraflores Locks 


726.256 




726.256 












236,127 




286,127 






Total 


1,012,383 




1.012,383 






Total wet and dry ex- 
cavation 


1.205,531 


12.104 


1.217,635 



TOTAL CANAL EXCAVATION. 




Dry excavation 

Wet excavation 


1.' 05,409 
1,607,672 


45,704 


1.0S1.U3 
1,607.672 






Total 


2.613,081 


43,704 


2.658.785 



LOCKS AND DAMS. 




Material. 


Atlantic. 


Pacific. 


Total. 


Concrete placed in 
locks 

Concrete placed in 
dams and spillways. . 

Fill placed in dams 


Cu. Yds. 

6.:58 

2,422 
73.797 


Cu. Yds. 

5,527 

2.531 
18,350 


Cu. Yds. 

11.7»S 

4.953 
92.14? 



by the Canal and constitutes excavation useful for the 
completed Canal. 

By "Plant" excavation is meant excavation outside 
of any of the constituent parts of the Canal, such as 
prism, diversions, or locks, etc. It includes material 
necessary to be excavated for construction purposes 
only, and is chargeable against the particular plant 
item for which it is performed such as prism, diver- 
.sious. locks, ttc. 



Changes in CofTerdam at Batboa Terminals. 

The plan for the construction of the coffer- 
dam around the outer ends and approaches of 
the di->-docks for the Pacific terminals has 
been modified with the view of decreasing the 
amount of fill necessary for its construction, 
and thus advancing the date of its com- 
pletion. The conditions and character of the 
underlying rock and the soft mud of the 
harbor bottom indicated that a very flat slope 
would be assumed on the harbor side and the 
effect of the small quantity of material which 
was dumped from the trestles caused a bulg- 
ing of the bottom in the entrance channel to 
the repair wharf and a settlement of about 
18 inches in one section of the west trestle. 
In general, firm rock was found in driving the 
piles for the trestle, lower than had been indi- 
cated by previous borings over this area. 
For these reasons it was deemed advisable and 
expedient to bring the southwest end of the 
cofferdam trestle inland and away from the 
channel. Accordingly, two drivers began 
driving a single-track trestle on the relocated 
line on August ,5 and completed it on August 
10, 410 lineal feet of trestle being required to 
connect with the old railroad fill along the 
shore. About 600 lineal feet of the original 
double trestle were utilized and the remainder 
is being removed and the material used else- 
where. The fill from trestle on the present line 
will be 39,850 cubic yards as compared with 
96,000 cubic yards on the original location. 
Spoil will be dumped on the seaward side 
of the trestle until the fill is even with the 
track, when a spur will be laid on the fill and 
"fanned" outward, to extend the dam as re- 
quired. For the rest of the way, from the old 
to the new site of the dredging landing, a 
similar procedure will be followed, starting, 
however, directly from the present shore. 
The soft fill will be extended out, as desired 
and then armored on the sea face with rock. 
In the excavation for the drydocks, part of 
the fill will be removed by the steamshovels, 
though the dam will be extended sufficiently 
to protect the site. The remainder of the 
spoil will be taken out by dredges, after the 
completion of the drydock excavation. 

Soft clay fo'r the filling is being taken from 
the northeast toe of Diablo Hill, adjacent to 
the right of way of the Panama railroad. 
This excavation will be useful later in the 
construction of the permanent yards and the 
main line tracks to Balboa. It is proposed, 
to operate trains to Balboa direct from Coro- 
zal, by passing along the east toe of Sosa 
Dam; southbound passenger trains will go 
first to Balboa, thence to Panama, superseding 
the present arrangement by which trains 
proceed to Panama, and Balboa is served by 
a shuttle train. 



Mean rainfall along Canal (ten stations), U- 28 inches. 

By "Work" excavation is meant excavation actually 
made for one of the constituent parts of the Canal, 
Buch as prism, diversions, or locks, etc.; that is. it 
pepreeents material taken from the area to be occupied 



Steamstiovei and Dredge Men. 

Local No. 19, International Brotherhood 
of Steamshovel and Dredge Men, will hold 
its next meeting in the lodge hall at Empire, 

on Sunday, September 21, at 12.30 p. m. 

« 

An addition, 30 by 40 feet in size, will be 
made to the oil house of the Quartermaster's 
Department at Balboa, for the storage of rope 
and cable. 



S»pt«mber 17, 1913. 



THE CANAL RECORD 



27 



SOCIAL LIFE OF THE ZONE. 



Church Notes. 

The Rt. Rev. Albion \V. Knight, D. D., 
bishop of the Episcopal church in America, 
and formerly missionary bishop of Cuba and 
of the Panama mission, has accepted the 
appointment of vice-chancellor of the Uni- 
versity of the South, Sewanee, Tenn. Bishop 
Knight, who has been overseer of the Panama 
mission as commissary of the presiding bishop 
since its establishment in 1907, will continue 
in charge. It is e.xpected that his annual 
visitations will be made in the summer, in- 
stead of in January, as hitherto. He will give 
up the work in Cuba, and his episcopal resi- 
dence in Havana, where he has resided for a 
number of jears. 

A sacred concert took the place of the regu- 
lar evening service in the Commission chapel 
at Gatun on Sunday evening, September 7. 

The altar chapters of the Episcopal church 
in Colon and Gatun met for a social afternoon 
at the rectory on Colon beach on Thursday, 
September 11. A program of informal music 
was given, followed by a reception, during 
which refreshments were served. The party 
then adjourned to the church, where Mrs. 
A. G. Farmer played several selections on the 
organ. The altar chapter of Christ Church, 
Colon, will hold a Christmas bazaar in De- 
cember, the proceeds to be used in liquidating 
the indebtedness on the organ. 

The monthly meeting of the Isthmian 
Ministers Association was held at Culebra 
on IMonday, September 8. The annual elec- 
tion of officers, which should have taken place 
at this meeting, was postponed, and will be 
held at the Methodist Episcopal church, 
Panama, on October 6. 



C-.ioal Zone Schools to Open October 1. 

The public schools of the Canal Zone will 
open on Wednesday, October 1, 1913. All 
children residing in the Canal Zone, whether 
of employes or nc^n-mployes, and all children 
of nonresident employes of the Isthmian Canal 
Commission are entitled to free school privi- 
leges. No child will be admitted, however, 
who will not be si.\ years old on or before 
February 1, 191-1. 

Schools for white children will be opened 
at the following places: Ancon, grades one to 
eight; Corozal, grades one to eight; Pedro 
Miguel, grades one to eight; Paraiso, grades 
one to four; Culebra, grades one to five; Em- 
pire, grades one to eight; Las Cascadas, 
grades one to five; Gatun, grades one to eight ; 
Cristobal, grades one to eight; Porto Bello, 
grades one to eight. 

Schools for colored children will be opened 
at the following places: Ancon, Paraiso, Cu- 
caracha, Culebra, Empire, Mandingo, Gatun, 
Mount Hope, Cristobal, and Majagual. 

High schools will be conducted as follows: 

A branch high school at Gatun for first 
and second year pupils residing at Cristobal 
and Gatun. 

A branch high school at Empire for first 
and second year pupils residing at Has Obispo, 
Las Cascadas, Empire, and Culebra. 

The consolidated high school at Ancon for 
first and second year pupils residing south 
of Culebra, and for all third and fourth year 
pupils in the Zone. 

Pupils attending the grade schools should 
report at 9 a. m.; those attending the Gatun 
high school, at 9.30 a. m.; those attending 
the Empire high school, at 9 a. ra. ; and those 



attending the Ancon high school, at 1 p. m. 
Requests should be made of the office of 
the Superintendent of Schools, Ancon, im- 
mediately for railroad transportation for all 
white children living in communities where 
schools of appropriate grades are not pro- 
vided, or brake service furnished. 



Entertainments at Gamboa Stockade. 

The first of a series of entertainments for the 

prisoners in the Gamboa stockade was given 

on Sunday, September 14, and included music 

by the Marine Band and addresses by Mr. 

Richard L. Metcalfe and Judges H. A. Gudger 

and VV. H. Jackson. It is proposed to provide 

educational facilities for the illiterate prisoners 

under the direction of the superintendent of 

schools with the cooperation of the chief of 

police. 

^^ 

Examination by Board of Local Inspectors. 

The Board of Local Inspectors will conduct 
examinations at the Administration Building, 
Ancon, on Wednesday, September 24, 1913, 
beginning promptly at 2 p. m., for persons de- 
siring to procure the following classes of licen- 
ses: Pilots, masters, mates, marine engineers, 
chaufifeurs, and navigators of motor boats. 
All applicants for licenses must procure from 
the E.xecutive Office, Ancon, forms of applica- 
tion and information respecting the filling out 
of same, at least one day before the examina- 
tion. Applicants for chauffeurs' licenses must 
also bring automobiles. 



Lake Service for Tourists. 

In order to provide suitably for the tourist 
traffic during the coming season, the Panama 
railroad has decided to add a trip through the 
lake as one of the regular features of its sight- 
seeing service. This arrangement will be ac- 
complished by lashing two cement lighters 
broadside, and converting them into a passen- 
ger barge by decking them over, providing 
awnings and railings, and installing toilets 
and other conveniences. This will give 
a floor space of about 40 by 100 feet, sufficient 
to accommodate chairs for approximately 400 
people with safety and comfort. The impro- 
vised barge will be towed through the lake 
channel from Gatun by one of the Canal Com- 
mission tugs, making a landing near Tower 
R, about 150 feet north of Gamboa cabin, 
out of the way of any vessels using the Canal. 
A small landing stage will be built at that 
point, with steps leading down to it from the 
track level. 

Under the proposed arrangement, the sight- 
seeing train will leave Colon for Gatun at 
about 8 a. m. Arriving at Gatun, the pas- 
sengers will transfer to the lake barge, while 
the train will proceed to Gamboa to await 
there the arrival of the barge. The tourists 
will then be taken by train over the relocated 
line and the I. C. C. spur track to a point near 
the Empire suspension bridge, where an ex- 
cellent view of Culebra Cut may be obtained. 
From this point, the train will run into 
Panama, and then return to Colon direct. 
Parties from Panama wishing to avail them- 
selves of the lake trip may leave Panama on 
train No. 2, connect at Gatun with the lake 
service, and return to Panama by the sight- 
seeing train. Parties from Colon may either 
return by the sightseeing train, or remain 
in Panama, as they see fit. It is probable 
that a charge of $1.50 per person will be made 
for the lake trip, in addition to the round 
trip rate of $4 over the railroad, which will 
be only $1 more than the rate charged 



tourists at the present time for a trip on 
the sightseeing train over all divisions. It 
is planned to place the new service in effect 
as soon as the barges can be converted and 
passed through the locks. 



Association of Canal Eniployes. 

The Association of the Panama Canal 
Builders was formed at a meeting held by 21 
employes of the Isthmian Canal Commission 
and the Panama Railroad Company, at the 
resident engineer's office, Corozal, on Sep- 
tember 12. 

The object of the association is to furnish 
to all its members such mementos, historic 
facts, and other reminders, as will enable them 
to recall the days of the building of the Pana- 
ma Canal and to give their friends the best 
possible idea of the actual conditions under 
which the work was accomplished. 

The association has already prepared a 
certificate commemorating the building of the 
Canal, and the Chairman and Chief Engineer 
has agreed to affix his signature to one cer- 
tificate for each employe who has been ac- 
cepted to membership in the society. 

A neatly bound record of the building of 
the Panama Canal and the people who built 
it will be prepared and dedicated to Col. 
George W. Goethals. This record ' will con- 
tain photographs of historic importance, com- 
parative figures, and the name and home ad- 
dress of every white person who has ever been 
an employe of the Isthmian Canal Commis- 
sion or the Panama Railroad Company since 
the beginning of the Canal construction. The 
record will be compiled as rapidly as official 
data can be obtained from the files of the 
Chairman's office. The work is of such a 
nature that it will require several months to 
complete it, and any members separating 
from the service in the meantime will be 
forwarded a copy to the address given on the 
application blank. 

A membership fee of $5 will be charged, 
which will entitle every member to one certifi- 
cate, one of the records, and all the good offices 
and influences of the society. It is requested 
that all who are eligible identify themselves 
with the association without delay, in order 
to complete the records while the present or- 
ganization is still intact. 

The secretary-treasurer will be bonded in 
the sum of §2,000. 

The members of the board of governors 
are: H. O. Cole, president; Dr. D. F. Reeder, 
first vice-president; J. B. Fields, second vice- 
president; F. T. Hamlin, secretary-treasurer; 
L. A. Smith, J. C. Keller, D. E. Wright, E. 
Zook, J. A. Walker, R. C. Shady, H. H. 
Hammer, W. A. Lawlor, H. G. Hamlin, J. C. 
Earle, G. D. Bliss, W. W. Webb, Dr. C. E. 
Phillips, W. C. Poore, S. C. Russell, Baxter 
Grier, B. F. Metcalf. 



Notice to Photographers. 

All who took kodak or other pictures of 
Shriners August 28 to September 2, are re- 
quested to send two prints of each picture, 
together with name and address to 

F. H. Wang, Secretary, 
The Pa na ma Shriners Club. 
Gatun, C. Z., September 16, 1913. 

♦ 

Missing Man. 
Any one having information regarding the 
whereabouts of I\lr. James W. Hays, Jr. of 
Vicksburg, Miss., who is supposed to be on 
the Isthmus, is requested to communicate 
with The Canal Record. 



28 



THE CANAL RECORD 



Vol. VII, No. 4. 



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'-So 






September 17, 1913. 



THE CANAL RECORD 



29 



PANAMA WATER SUPPLY. 



Miraflorea Lake Water for Towns at Southern 
End of Canal. 

The work of constructing the new water 
works for the southern end of the canal is 
now well under way and forces are at work on 
the new pump station and purification plant 
at Mirafiores, and the high service reservoir 
at Ancon. 

The project, in general, comprises three 
electric pump stations, one located east of the 



vertically, through specially designed nozzles, 
and will break into spray, falling to the floor 
of the basin, then passing into the mixing 
chambers in the basement of the head house. 
At this point the water will receive its dose 
of aluminum sulphate and will flow into the 
sedimentation basin. Here it will be allowed 
to stand for a period of eight hours, after 
which it will pass on to the filters. After 
passing through the filters, the water will dis- 
charge directly through the floor of the pipe 




Layout of Filtration 
railroad track at Miraflores, to be known as 
Mirafiores pump station No. 1 ; one to be lo- 
cated between the Miraflores spillway and the 
southern portal of the Panama railroad tun- 
nel, to be known as Miraflores pump station 
No. 2 ; and one to be located along the main 
line of the Panama railroad between Panama 
md Balboa and in the vicinity of the new 
Administration building, to be known as the 
/neon pump station; a purification plant, 
heated on the hill immediately above and 
nirth of the Miraflores spillway, consisting of 
ai aeration basin, a head house containing 
aliminum sulphate and hypochlorite of lime 
sttrage, together with mixing chambers, float 
chimber, solution tanks, controllers, electric 
ele-ator; sedimentation basin having a ca- 
pacity of five million gallons; a filter plant 
cortaining 14 filters of the rapid mechanical 
gravity type, each having a nominal capacity 
of 1125,000 gallons of water every 24 hours, 
anda clear water basin having a capacity of 
appDximately 900,000 gallons; and an 
offici and laboratory building within which 
will le provided, in addition to the laborator>' 
and 'ffice, living quarters for the chemists 
who nil be on duty in connection with the 
operaion of the plant throughout the 24 hours 
of the lay. 

Theproject also includes a 350,000-gallon 
wash \feter tank located on the hill to the 
south wet of the i\liraflores tunnel, at an ele- 
vation (f approximately 200 feet above sea- 
level. Tiis tank will store the water delivered 
to it byDump station No. 2, and will furnish 
the filteiid water for washing the filter, for 
miscellartous uses around the plant, and will 
provide asupply of filtered water through a 
16-inch min for the town of Pedro Miguel. 
The rai water from Miraflores Lake will 
pass from he surface of the lake into a screen 
chamber, hd through the screens in this 
structure, \f the sump beneath the electric 
pumps loca^d in pump station No. 1. From 
this point, he water will be pumped through 
a 30-inch mJn to the aeration basin, where 
it will be thown into the air about 15 feet 



Pl-\nt at Mir.\flores. 
gallery into the clear water basin, from which 
point it will flow through a 36-inch line into 
the hypochlorite injection chamber located 
near pump station No. 2. At this point the 



and a 16-inch main between Miraflores and 
Ancon, which will be connected with the 
injection chamber, and, in addition, there will 
be laid from this point to Panama a new 30- 
inch main, thus giving three mains between 
the purification plant and the Ancon pump 
station. The Ancon pump station will con- 
tain five electrically-driven centrifugal pumps, 
three of which, having a capacity of 5,000 
gallons per minute, each, will pump the 
water directly from the mains into the dis- 
tribution system for Panama, Ancon, and 
Balboa, at a pressure not to exceed 30 pounds 
per square inch. The existing 1,000,000- 
gallon capacity low service reser\'oir will be so 
connected to these pumps as to form a storage 
and surge reservoir. The two remaining 
pumps in the Ancon station will be of the same 
tj'pe as the low service pumps above referred 
to, but Avill be designed to develop 100 pounds 
per square inch pressure in the mains, and, in 
ordinary service, will pump the water into the 
high ser\'ice reser\'oir on Ancon hill; in 
this way it will furnish the water supply for 
the high lying districts and also a high pres- 
sure for use in case of fire. 

As a part of the project, there is being con- 
structed an extension to the present 1,000,000- 
gallon high service reservoir on Ancon hill, 
which, when completed, will give 2,500,000 
gallons storage at an elevation of 300 feet 
above sealevel. For fire protection in the 
city of Panama, the high service pumps in the 
Ancon pump station and the main pipe lines 
will be so arranged that the high ser\'ice pres- 




■' ■ :r-M-7:-\ ^ :^-'^-' ■-^.- |-,-':^/v.^--''--:-'fAA^: 



i/rrroff toa<r/iS /^f^tl 
Typical Section oI'" Filter Building, Miraflores. 



hypochlorite bleach will be applied and the 
water will pass from this chamber into the 
mains leading to Panama. 

At the present time there are a 20-inch 



sure can, within 15 seconds after the fire 
alarm is turned into the station, be thrown in- 
to the main without affecting the low pressure 
service for Balboa; and, vice versa, in case 



30 



THE CANAL RECORD 



Vol. ril, No. 4. 



of fire at Balboa, the high service pressure 
can be developed at that point without dis- 
turbing the low pressure service in Panama. 

The project involves the laying of a new 
16-inch high service main from the Ancon 
pump station to the high service reservoir, 
and a new 20-inch main from the Ancon 
pump station to the new shops at Balboa, 
where the line will be reduced to 16-inch. 
This line will extend through the terminals 
to the south side of Sosa Hill, where the line 
will again be reduced to 12-inch, and this size 
main will extend to the extreme end of the 
docks at Balboa. 

When the entire project is ready for service 
no water will reach Panama from the Rio 
Grande reservoir, and all lines now existing 
north of Pedro Miguel will have been removed. 
The Rio Grande reservoir will be maintained 
for the service of Culebra only, and in the 
event of the abandonment of this town, the 
use of the Rio Grande reservoir will be dis- 
continued. 

One of the accompanying sketches shows 
the general layout of the different parts of 
the project in the vicinity of Miraflores, and 
the other shows a general cross-section of 
the filter building. 



Killed In Attempting to Board Train. 

Philip O'Shaughnessy, an American em- 
ployed as a foreman by the Central Division 
on the dumps at East Balboa, was instantly 
killed about 1 p. m., on Thursday, September 
11, by falling between two cars while attempt- 
ing to board a loaded work train at a point 
about 20 yards from the Tivoli steps in tne 
Panama railroad yard at Panama. He was 
38 years of age, and arrived on the Isthmus 
on August 2, 190p, coming here from New 
Rochelle, N. Y. He is survived by his wife, 
living in Panama, a brother, living in Salt 
Lake City, and two sisters, Mrs. John Boyd, 
No. 753 Cordero street, Vancouver, B. C, 
and Mrs. Dora Van Horn, Point Pleasant, 

• 

Obituary. 

The death of James H. Hibben, an Ameri- 
can employed in the Sixth Division as 
engineer on the tug Porto Bella, with residence 
at Cristobal, occurred suddenly on Saturday 
evening, September 13, at the Hotel Wash- 
ington, at the conclusion of a banquet at 
which he was officiating as toastmaster. The 
cause was heart disease. He was 44 years of 
age, entered the service of the Canal Com- 
mission on March 18, 1910, and is survived 
by a wife and four children, living in New 
Orleans. 

The death of William P. Emmett, a natural- 
ized American employed in the Atlantic 
Division, with residence at Cristobal, oc- 
curred on Wednesday, September 10. He 
was a native of Ireland, 50 years of age, a 
widower, and had been on the Isthmus three 
years and three months. Two daughters, 
Mrs.^. C. Anderson, No. 1009 Main avenue, 
Brownsville, Tex., and Mrs. E. Kenzie, No. 
1920 Avenue G, Galveston, Tex., survive 
him. 



Civil Service Examinations. 

Examinations for the following-named po- 
sitions are scheduled to be held probably on 
October 19: Agricultural inspector, Philip- 
pine Service; assistant observer. Weather 
Bureau; aid. Lighthouse Service; cadet en- 
gineer, cadet officer. Lighthouse Service; civil 



engineer and draftsman, nonapportioned De- 
partmental Ser\'ice; civil engineer and super- 
intendent of construction, Quartermaster 
Corps; mechanical draftsman, topographic 
draftsman, Isthmian Canal Service; electri- 
cian, nonapportioned Departmental Service; 
engineer, Indian Service (steam engineering, 
electrical engineering, heating, refrigeration, 
gas, and gasoline engines, hydraulics); junior 
engineer (mining). Bureau of Mines; junior 
engineer (civil), junior engineer (mechanical 
or electrical). Engineer Department at large; 
postal clerk, Isthmian Canal Service; printer, 
Philippine Service; scientific assistant. De- 
partment of Agriculture; teacher, Indian 
Service; trained nurse, Indian and Isthmian 
Canal Services; wireman, nonapportioned 
Departmental Service. 

Women will be admitted to examinations 
for scientific assistant, teacher, and trained 
nurse. 

Applications should be procured from and 
filed with this office. In requesting infor- 
mation, the kind of examination desired 
should be specifically mentioned. 

The examinations will be held probably at 
Empire, in the Commission clubhouse, but 
the place of examination, and also the date, 
should be omitted in application forms. 

A card of admission will be sent to those 
found eligible to be admitted, just before the 
examination. 

Applicants for the Isthmian Canal or Philip- 
pine Services who fail to present a photograph 
to the exami?ier will not be admitted to examina- 
tion. 

In answer to questions as to residence, 
applicants must show residence in a State or 
Territory of the United States, and county 
thereof, up to the time of filing application. 
Isthmian Civil Service Board. 

Culebra, C. Z., September 13, 1913. 



EXECUTIVE ORDER 



Ralnlail, Sept. 1 to Sept. 13, 1913, Inclusive. 



Stations. 


3 CO 

.5 <u 

^ a 


2 


Total for 
period. 


Pacific Section — 


Ins. 
1.33 
1.86 
1.25 
.91 
1.41 

1.93 
2.24 
1.23 
.65 
2.15 
1.22 
1.00 
2.22 
3.26 

1.26 

1.35 

1.54 

.64 


s 

8 
9 
9 
8 

8 
9 
8 
6 
6 
3 
6 
S 
5 

5 
5 
8 
9 


l!lS. 

3.24 


Balboa 


3,23 
3.58 




4.07 




4.95 


Central Stclion — 


6.11 




3.61 




4.75 




3.63 




5.14 




3.78 


*El Vigia 


3.43 




6.33 


*Monte Lino 


6. OS 


Atlantic Section — 


3.31 




4.87 




4.72 


Porto Bello . . . 


2.01 







♦Standard rain gage — readings at 5 p. m., daily. 
Automatic rain gage at unstarred stations — values 
midnight to midnight. tTo 5 p. m., September 12. 



Cold Storage Prices. 

No changes have been made during the past week 
in the list of cold storage articles sold at the com- 
missaries. 



Found — One heavy gold band linger ring, initialed. 
Owner can have same, upon proper identification, at 
Police Headquarters, Ancon. 



Found — Bathing suit, taken by mistake from the 
recreation hall at Toro Point on Sunday, September 7. 
Owner can have same by calling at House 300-C, Cris- 
tobal. 



Relating to Bail Bonds and Money Deposits in 

Lieu Thereof, and to Amend Section 310 of 

Criminal Procedure of the Canal Zone. 

By virtue of the authority vested in me, 
I hereby establish the following Executive 
Order for the Canal Zone: 

Section 1. The defendant in a criminal 
proceeding before a District Court of the 
Canal Zone may make a cash deposit in lieu 
of a bail bond in form and manner as pro- 
vided for in Sections 305, 306, and 307 of the 
Criminal Procedure Act No. 15 of the Canal 
Zone, and a certificate of deposit shall be 
issued to the defendant by the judge in each 
case. 

Section 2. Whenever a warrant is issued 
by any court or judge of the Canal Zone in a 
case in which bail may be admitted, the court 
or judge issuing such warrant shall endorse 
thereon the amount of bail to be required of 
the defendant to secure his appearance in the 
case, and the officer executing the warrant 
may accept a bail bond or money deposit in 
lieu thereof in the sum specified in the war- 
rant, and in the form prescribed by law, and 
the bail bond or money deposit in lieu thereof 
shall be forthwith delivered to the court 
having jurisdiction of the case, and a receipt 
for such bond or deposit shall be given to such 
officer by the clerk of the court, or the judge 
thereof if the case is pending in a district 
court. 

WTien an arrest is made without a warrant 
in conformity with law in a misdemeanor case, 
and for any reason the officer making the 
arrest is unable to take the offender forthwitf 
before a magistrate, he may accept bond o" 
a cash deposit in lieu thereof from the offender 
in a sum not exceeding five hundred dolla's 
to secure his appearance before the coirt 
having jurisdiction of the case, and tie 
offender shall then be released from custdy 
and the bond or cash deposit in lieu thereof 
shall be delivered to the proper officei or 
court as hereinbefore provided for in his 
section. 

When a money deposit is made in liei of 
bail bond, the deposit shall' be held and dis- 
posed of in accordance with the provisicis of 
Sections 305, 306, 307, and 311 of theCrininal 
Procedure of the Canal Zone, and Sectici 310 
thereof, as hereinafter amended. 

Section 3. That Section 310 of theCrim- 
inal Procedure of the Canal Zone is ananded 
to read, as follows: 

Section 310. If money has beer de- 
posited instead of bail, and the deend- 
ant, at any time before the forfiture 
thereof, surrenders himself to the fficer 
to whom the commitment was ditcted, 
in the manner provided in the t%o pre- 
ceding sections, the court must 'tder a 
return of the deposit to the defndant, 
upon producing the certificate of the 
officers showing the surrender, ad upon 
a notice of five days to the Proecuting 
Attorney, with a copy of the crtificate. 
Section 4. This Order shall ake effect 
from and after its publication in "he Canal 
Record. 

WooDROW Wilson. 
The White House, 
AiigJist 29, 1913. 
* 

Lost— Gold locket with ruby settir.s and the initial 
"B" on face, in Cristobal or Colon, o the morning of 
September 14. A liberal reward wilbe paid for same 
il presented at Ciisiobal Y. M. C. A 



September 17, 1913. 



THE CANAL RECORD 



31 



OFFICIAL CIRCULARS. 



Chanfie in Program Regarding P. R. R. Vessels 
Sailing in October. 

CuLEBRA, C. Z., September 16, 1913. 
Heads of Departments axd Divisions: 

My circular letter dated August 27, reserving all 
accommodations on the steamships Colon, sailing Oc- 
tober 12; Ancon, sailing on or about October 13; 
Advance, sailing October 18; and Panama, sailing 
October 23. for employes leaving the service, was based 
on the supposition that the reduction of force in the 
Central Division would commence on or about Oc- 
tober 10, As a change in the program rendered it neces- 
sary to commence reducing the force in the Central 
Division at an earlier date than was anticipated, it 
is not considered necessary to reserve these boats ex- 
clusively for employes leaving the service, and the cir- 
cular letter referred to is hereby cancelled. 

Geo. W. Goethals. 
Chairman and Chief En siineer. 



Duties of Board of Survey and Appraisal. 

CuLEBRA, C. Z.. September 10, 1913. 
Circular No. 399-c: 

The duties of the board of appraisal, and of the sur- 
veying officer and assistant surveying officer, are hereby 
combined in a board of survey and appraisal. 

The membership of the board will be, as follows: 
Mr. H. S. Parish, chairman. Mr. Charles L. Parker, Mr. 
B. M. Litt. and Mr. C. T. Cushman. 

Appraisals will be made by the chairman and any two 
members of the board. 

Surveys will be made by Mr. Parish and Mr. Litt as 
at present, and by Mr. Parker and Mr. Cushman at 
such points and at such times as this work can conven- 
iently be performed in conjunction with their other 
duties. Any member of the board is hereby authorized 
to make surveys under the direction of and subject to 
approval by the chairman of the board; all surveys to 
be submitted to me by the chairman of the board for 
final approval. 

The present forms and instructions will continue in 
effect without other change, the above arrangement be- 
ing temporary and necessary to handle the increased 
amount of business due to completion of the work. 
Geo. W. Goethals, 
Chairman, Isthmian Canal Commission. 
President, Panama Railroad Company. 



Charges for Oxygen and Acetylene. 

Culebra, C. Z., September 9, 1913. 
Heads of Departments and Divisions: 

Effective September 1. 1913, the charges for oxygen 
and acetylene gases made by the Mechanical Division 
are hereafter reduced to S5 per tank for oxygen, and 
$3.50 per tank for acetylene. 

Geo. W. Goethals. 
Chairman and Chief Engineer. 



Mailing Tracings and Drawings. 

Culebra. C. Z.. September 15. 1913. 
Circular No. 499; 

Tracings or valuable drawings set through the mails 
must be carefully packed in tin tubes. 

Geo. W. Goethals, 
Chairman and Chief Engineer. 



Changes in Central Division. 

Empire. C. Z., September 12. 1913. 
Central Division Circular No. 379; 

Effective September 14, 1913, the Central Division 
will be divided into two sections, as follows: 

Southern section — From south entrance of Mirafiores 



tunnel to Balboa, to and including Naos Island break- 
water and Sosa Hill quarry. Mr. J. M. Hatan, super- 
intendent of construction, in charge, with headquarters 
at East Balboa. 

Northern section — From north entrance of Mirafiores 
tunnel to Gamboa, to and including relocation dumps. 
Mr. \V. M. Tenny. superintendent of construction, in 
charge. *vith headquarters at Empire. 

A. S. Zinn, 
Acting Division Engineer. 



Extension of Labor Train Passes. 

Empire, C. Z., September 12, 1913. 
All Concerned — The date of expiration of all Bas 
Obispo-Balboa labor train passes is hereby extended 
to December 31, 1913. A, S. Zinn, 

Acting Division Engineer. 



Acting Post-Office Inspector. 

Ancon, C. Z., September 6, 1913. 
To Heads of Divisions — Mr. Garfield O. Gilbert, as- 
sistant postmaster at Cristobal, is designated acting 
postoffice inspector, vice Mr. James J. Gilbert, desig- 
nated acting deputy collector of revenues. 

Richard L. Metcalfe, 
Head of Department of Civil .Administration. 



Consolidation of Telephone and Signal Depart- 
ments, P. R. R. 

Panama Railroad Company, 
Office of General Superintendent, 
Colon. R. P., September 9, 1913. 
All Concerned — Effective September 16. 1913. the 
telephone department and the signal department of the 
Panama railroad will be consolidated, and Mr. W. H. 
Penley appointed superintendent of telephones and sig- 
nals. John D. Patterson, 

General Superintendent. 



Launch Trips through Gatun Lake for Masters 
and Mates. 

Cristobal, C. Z., September 8, 1913. 
All Concerned — The launch Margaret will be run every 
Sunday from Gatun to Gamboa dike and return, the 
object of this trip being to enable masters and mates in 
the employ of the Commission to familiarize themselves 
with the Canal channel between Gatun and Gamboa. 
Launch will leave Gatun at 9 a. m.. and Gamboa (Tow- 
er R) at 1 p. m. The number of passengers for these 
trips will be limited to six. Passes may be secured from 
W. G. Comber, resident engineer, Balboa, Canal Zone. 
W. G. Comber. 
Resident Engineer. 



Cashier, Disbursing Office. 

Empire, C. Z.. September 6, 1913. 
Effective this date, Mr. Robt. W. Glaw is appointed 
cashier. Disbursing Office, vice Mr. C. E. GUmore. re- 
signed. The cashier, in addition to duties heretofore 
performed, will have charge of all pay roll work; and 
telephone inquiries relating to time vouchers, pay tick- 
ets, or pay rolls after they reach this office should be 
made of him. John H. McLean, 

Disbursing Officer. 



Supplies for the Canal. 

The following steamers with supplies for the Isth- 
mian Canal Commission and Panama Railroad Com- 
pany, arrived at the ports of Colon and Cristobal 
during the week ending September 6: 

Panama. September 1. from New York, with 260 
drums paint, for stock; 60 boxes incandescent lamps, 
for Mechanical Division; eight barrels electric fixtures, 



for Panama railroad; 100 bales oakum, 90 bags tie 
plugs. 13 cases water coolers, for stock; nine cases elec- 
trical machinery, for emergency dams; 20 boxes screen 
doors and sashes, 15 crates screen doors and sashes, for 
stock; 33 castings. 33 boxes tackle blocks. 176 bundles 
steel, for fortifications; 13 barrels iron pipe-fittings, 
for stock; 195 barrels asphaltum, for McClintic-Mar- 
shall Construction Company; 22 cases packing, for 
stock; 179 pieces castings, for Mechanical Division; 
22 barrels copper sulphate, for Panama railroad; 2.300 
pieces hollow tile, for Second Division; 802 bundles tie 
plates, 130 pieces switches, 98 bundles switch parts, for 
stock; and a miscellaneous cargo, the whole consisting 
of 5.485 packages, weighing 501 tons. 

Almirante, September 3, from New York, with 17 
barrels iron pipe-fittings, 50 bales hose, for stock. 

Abangarez, September 4. from New Orleans, with 
3,894 pieces lumber, for stock and Mechanical Divi- 
sion; 520 sacks feed, 14 boxes paste, for stock. 

Nestorian, September 6, from Liverpool, with seven 
pieces parts for dredges, for Sixth Division. 



Family Quarters. 

Appli.-ations for married quarters on file on August 
31, were, as follows: 



District. 


List 
No. 1. 


List 
No. 2. 




7 

1 
1 (1) 


105 (20) 




S 




58 (4) 




13 




1 CD 


\M (1) 


Cristobal 


140 (7) 






38 (2^ 




2 (2) 
1 (1) 


79 (191 




86 (8) 




17 l3) 




i 

1 (1) 
1 


44 (1) 


Porto Bello 


14 (9) 




3 






Total 


16 (6) 


733 (74) 







Note — The figures in parentheses show the number 
of applicants already occupying rtgular or nonhouse- 
keeping family quarters at stations other than those at 
which applications are filed. 



Stages of the Chagres. 

Maximum heights of the Chagres River for the week 
ending midnight, Saturd3y, September 13, 1913. All 
heights are m feet above mean sealevel. 





Stations. 


Day and Date. 


Vigia. 


J3 

5 


i 

.a 
E 

o 


c * 


Sun.. September 7 

Mon.. September S 

T.iPS.. September 9. . . . 

Wed., September 10 

Thurs.. September 11. . 

Fri., September 12 

Sat.. September 13 


127.2 
126.4 
136.2 
129.0 
128.3 
1.'6 9 
128.2 


93 8 
93.0 
99 6 
94.8 

94 , 
93. I 
94 2 


61.9 
62.0 
62.6 
62.8 
62.8 
63 
63 


61.9 
62.0 
62 4 
62 7 

62 8 

63 
63.1 


Height of low water to 
nearest foot 


125.0 


91.0 44.0 





*Sluice gates in spillway at Gatun were closed on 
June 27, 1913. with surface of lake at elevation 48.25. 

•^-. 

Married. 
CLAPP-DEVINE — On Sep^emi.er 16. at the Union 
Church, Cristobal. Bertha May Devine of St. Paul. 
Minn., to Warner Howard Clapp of Kasota, Minn.. 
Rev. Carl H. Elliott ofticiatinfc. Canal Zone residence. 
Paraiso. 



CLASSIFIED EXPENDITURE S— ISTHM IAN CANAL COMMISSION. 

A statement of classified expenditures of the Isthmian Canal Commission to May 31, 1913, follows: 



Periods. 



Department 

of Civil 

Administration. 



Total to June 30, 1909 

Total— Fiscal Year, 1910.. 
Total— Fiscal Year. 1911 . . 
Total— Fiscal Year, 1912. , 

July, 1912 

August, 1912 

September, 1912 

October, 1912 

November. 1912 

December. 1912 

January, 1913 

February, 1913 

March. 1913 

April, 1913 

May, 1013 



Grand total 6.370.866 99 



3.427.090.29 

709,351.37 

7SS.079.44 

820.398.57 

63,913.12 

62.182.51 

59.201.01 

64..W3.37 

62.200.12 

58.987.96 

57.699.58 

56..';86.06 

58,761.03 

57,218.29 

57,814.27 



Department 

of 

Law. 



Department 
of 

Sanitation. 



I Department of 
I Construction 
and Engineering 



24.729.16 
1,448.53 
1.468.26 
1,207.82 
2,033.75 
1,892.14 
1,462.18 
1,469.59 
1.649.00 
1.899.22 
1.585.87 
2,872.19 



43.717.71 



.673.539.28 
,803,060.95 
,717,792.62 
,620,391.12 
123.803.64 
123,154.48 
120,385.70 
137,574.61 
119,031.66 
115,819.26 
114,562.04 
127,324.80 
105.891 .OS 
114,146,79 
115.598 00 



69.622. 

26,300, 

27,477, 

28,897, 

2,649, 

2.539, 

2,285, 

2,473, 

2,420, 

2.871 

2.825 

3,784 

2.712 

2.677 

2.849, 



561.42 
167.05 
776.19 
738.10 
246.61 
680.83 
,979.89 
280.76 
,085.77 
,077.03 
872.06 
370.51 
.218.10 
,640.00 
292-60 



General Items. Fortifications. 



Total. 



78.022.606. 

2.863,088 

3,097,959, 

2,819.926 

200.970 

*98,0.M 

77.0U3 

83,523 

75.779 

120.946 

6,463 

123.0.14 

•7.706 

132.223 

169.306 



1.212.881.66 
104.126.92 
111,402.55 
127.168.25 
129. 7.%, 37 
300.016.33 
118,152.57 
119.272.77 
314,994.96 
131.940 75 
131.970.93 
164.275.24 



160.745, 

31.675, 

33,018 

I 35.396, 

3.143, 

2,739, 

2.670, 

2,890, 

2,979, 

3,287, 

3,125, 

4.407, 

3.003, 

3,114 

3,359, 



,797.09 
,648.20 
,607.97 
,065.14 
.509.37 
,834.02 
,946,20 
,532.16 
,005.03 
,345.61 
,.?.39.76 
,959.45 
,003 . 48 
785.86 
159 07 



16.132.056.03 182,387.886 02 i 87.687.071 46 2965.9.;9.30 295,587 5.!8 41 



*Oeaote8 credit. 



32 



THE CANAL RECORD 



Vol. VII, No. 4. 



COMMISSION CLUBHOUSES. 

Activities of the Young Men's Christian Associa- 
tion. 

GENERAL. 

The moving picture schedule for the week September 
22 to 27 Is. as follows: Monday. Gatun; Tuesday, 
Corozal; Wednesday. Cristobal; Thursday. Culebra; 
Friday. Empire and Porto Bello; Saturday, Cristobal. 
Pictures to be shown this week include the follo%ving: 
"Saved from court martial," "An aeroplane love affair,|^ 
"The live wire," "The deceivers," "The cub reporter," 
"Tom's sister," "The sheriffs prisoner." Pictures to 
be shown next week include: "Along the River Nile," 
"Queen of the kitchen,""Pathe's weekly," "The darling 
of the C. S. A.," "The line at Hogan's," "A 10-karat 
hero,'" 'The Government test," "Three to one," and 
"His armless wonder— the detective's desperate 
chance." 

Delegates from the various clubhouses and Camp 
Elliott met at the Cristobal clubhouse on September 14 
for the purpose of electing officers and deciding on rules 
for the Isthmian tenpin bowling league. Mr. Frank 
Dougherty of Culebra was chosen chairman of the 
league, and Mr. Taylor of Corozal, official scorer and 
secretary. The league will open on October 4. 

COROZAL. 

Forty new library books have just been received from 
the United States. .... . 

The Empire basketball team defeated the local 
team by a score of 35 to 26 on Saturday night, Sep- 
tember 13. . , , . . 

Some of the members of the boys department 
"hiked" to Arraijan on Saturday, September 13. 

CULEBRA. 

Mr. J. F. Warner led the song service on Sunday 
evening. September 14. 

The high scores in tenpins for the past week were: 
Comthwaite. 202; Finley, 200. 

The local two-man bowling tournament will close on 
Tuesday. September 1?.. It is requested that all having 
games yet to roll will do so at once. 

Mr. D. V. Stratton will give a lecture, illustrated with 
slides and moving pictures, on Thursday, September 18, 
describing the Sacramento Valley and the Panama- 
Pacific Exposition. Admission will be free to all. 

EMPIRE. 

The results of the bowling' games rolled at Empire on 
Saturday. September 13, between Corozal and Empire 
were: Corozal. 9J0. 790, 816; Empire. 806. S5i, 946. 

In the local bowling league the team composed of 
Giavelli. Arnold, and F. Whaler won first place. The 
medals for high score and high average were won by 
Gustavson. 

On triday evening. September 19, a meeting of all 
men interested in the formation of a discussion and de- 
bating club will be held at the clushouse for the pur- 
pose of organizing. 

Basketball is holding interest for many of the men. 
The largest squad of players ever interested in this 
sport at Empire can be found any basketball night on 
the floor, practicinu the game. .Airead.v 27 men are ne- 
roUed in the local basketball league This squad is 
divided into four teams under the captaincy of Johnson. 
Sawyer, Miller, and Huldquist, 

GATIJN. 

Gatun defeated Culebra in a game of basketball at 
at Gatun on Wednesday evening, September 10, by 
the score of 22 to 17. The lineups were, as follows: 



.Gushing and Belcher 
.R. Purchase 
. F. Purchase 

Hepler 

.... Koperski 



Whiston R. F. 

Huber L. F.. 

Wright C. 

Conley R. G. 

Fitzpatrick L. G.- 

Referee. Christopherson; timekeeper, Ben Jenkins; 
scorer, Fomon. Attendance. 200. 

An illustrated talk on Louisiana will be given on 
Thursday evening. September 25. 

Cristobal defeated Gatun two out of three games of 
tenpins on Saturday evening. September 13. 

Mrs. Fostrom and Mrs. McLeod furnished violin 
and piano music for the motion picture entertainment 
on September 8. 

The executive council met on Friday evening. Sep- 
tember 12. Those present were: Mr. W. C. Gayer. 
Mr. W. B. Childers. Dr. Farmer, and Mr. Ben Jenkins. 
Mr. Robert M. Gamble, a charter member of the as- 
sociation, and for the past two years a member of the 
executive council, has resigned on account of leaving 
Gatun. 

The results of the bowling contests held on "Ladies 
night." September 12, were: ^ 

Open conlfsl — ^First prize, Mr. Humphrey and Mrs. 
Crosscup; second prize. Mr. Coleman and Mrs. Nolan. 

Married folks — First prize, Mr. and Mrs. Chas. C. G. 
Wurster; second prize, Mr. and Mrs. Grover. 

.\ set of "Library of natural history" and a set of 
"The world's best music" have been added to the li- 
brary during the past week. 

Mr. W. F. Bennyho£f will give a lecture on the Canal 



work on Tuesday, September 16, illustrated mth slides. 
The standing of the "Popular" handicap pool tourna- 
ment, on Saturday evening, September 13 was, as 
follows : 

Name. Won. Lost. P. C. 

Dewev 5 1.000 

Townsley 3 1000 

Kerruish 3 1 750 

Von 4 2 666 

Pettitt 2 1 666 

Bailey 3 .... 2 600 

O'Hara 3 .... 2 600 

Carkeet 2 .... 2 500 

Johnson 1 1 500 

C.Gray 4.... S 444 

Reisner 2 3 400 

Mitchell 1 3 250 

Dennis 1 .... 3 250 

Bradley 1 5 166 

Wall ^ .... 5 000 

CRISTOBAL. 

The stringed orchestra of the steamship Prinz 
Joachim, gave a concert on Monday night, September 
8, from 8 to 10 o'clock. 

Mr. T. A. Wehmeier has issued a challenge to all 
pool players to play for the championship of the Isth- 
mus. Mr. Wehmeier proposes to play 150 points on the 
home tables of each man who accepts his challenge, 
and 150 points on the Cristobal tables. 

Mr. W. F. Bamum rolled highest score in tenpins 
on the Cristobal alleys for the month of August, with 
235 points, and received a box of cigars as a prize, 

Messrs. Luce and Weller, members of the old Cris- 
tobal basketball team, are coaching the players until 
the arrival of the new plysical director. 

"What shall we do with the Monroe Doctrine?" 
is the theme for consideration at the discussion meeting 
on Thursday night. September 18. Messrs. H. J. 
Wempe and F. B. Freeland will lead the discussion. 

Mr. J. Frank Harbert. representing the Louisiana 
State Board of Immigration, gave an illustrated lecture 
on Louisiana, on Tuesday night, September 16. 

Interest is being displayed in the chess tournament 
now in progress. The present standing of the con- 
testants is in the following order: Ogden, Taylor, 
Hurt, Wilson, Salzburg. Vcmer, McQueen, Tuttle, 
Wechsler, Gill. Rattiner, Martin. 



MOVEMENT OF OCEAN VESSELS. 



Misdirected Lette/s- 

The followini, insufficiently addressed letters, origi- 
nating in the Linited States and its possessions, have 
been received in the office of the Director of Posts, and 
may be procured upon request or the addressees: 



Cummings. C. C. 
Davidson. Miss Edith 
Dunleavy, J. A. 
Durbin, C. A. 
Fernandez. Jose 
Foil, Lawrence (pkg.) 
Galow. Wm. 
Gilbert. D. A. 
Halvosa, William P. 
Hand. E. S. 
Hansen, Paul 



Henderson, Mrs. George 
Heng, Ch'is 
Hyder. Frank 
Joy, Sylvester 
McGuire, Mrs. E. 
Moadadian. Mrs. Julia 
Rounds, Wm, J. 
Scribner, Miss E. L. 
Shea, W. 
Zeamer, Emmett 



Tug Service to Porto Bello and Toro Point. 

Following is a revised schedule of Atlantic Division 
tugs in the service between Docks 13 and 16, and Porto 
Bello; and Docks 13 and 16, and Toro Point: 

PORTO BELLO. 

Mondays. Tuesdays. Wednesdays. Thursdays, and 
Fridays — Leave Dock 13 at 5 p. m.. arrive Porto Bello 
10 p. m.; returning, leave Porto Bello 11 p. m., arrive 
Dock 13 about 6 a. m. 

Saturdays — Leave Dock 13 at 9 a. m., arrive Porto 
Bello at 11 a.m.; returning, leave Porto Bello 3.45 p.m., 
arrive pier No. 4, Colon. 5.45 p. m. 

Every Saturday — Leave Dock 13 at 6. p. m., arrive 
Porto Bello at 11 p. m.; returning, leave Porto Bello 12 
midnight, arrive Dock 13 about 6 a. m. 

Every Sunday — Leave Pier 16 at 7 p. m.. arrive Porto 
Bello 9 p.m.; returning, leave Porto Bello 9 p. m., arrive 
Pier 16 at 11 p. m. 

TORO POINT. 

Mondays, Tuesdays. Wednesdays. Thursdays, and 
Fridays. Sailing No. I — Leave Dock 13 at 6.30 a. m., 
arrive Toro Point 7 a. m. ; returning, leave Toro Point 
8 a. m., arrive Dock 13 at 8. 30 a. m. Sailing No. 2 — 
Leave Dock 13 at 5 p. m.. arrive Toro Point 5.30 p. m. 

Special. Wednesdays only — Leave Dock 13 at 12 
noon, arrive Toro Point 12.30 p. m.; returning, leave 
Toro Point 12.30 p. m.. arrive Dock 13 at 1 p. ra. 

Saturdays. Sailing No. I — Leave Dock 13 at 6.30 
a. m.. arrive Toro Point 7 a. m.; returning, leave Toro 
Point 8 a. m., arrive Dock 13 at 8.30 a. m. Sailing 
No. Z — Leave Dock 13 at 5 p. m , arrive Toro Point 
5.30 p. m.: leave Toro Point 5.30 p. m.. arrive Dock 
13 at 6 p. m. 

Sundays. Sailing No. 1 — Leave Dock 13 at 9.30 
a. m.. arrive Toro Point 10 a.m.; returning, leave Toro 
Point at 10.30 a. m., arrive Dock 13 at 11 a. m. 
Sailing No. 2 — Leave Pier 16 at 4.30 p. m., arrive 
Toro Point 5 p. m.; returning, leave Toro Point 5 p. m. 
rrive Pier 16 at 5.30 p. m. 



The following is a list of sailings of the Panama 
Railroad Steamship Company; of the Royal Mail 
Steam Packet Company; of the Hamburg-American 
Line, and of the United Fruit Company's Line: 

NEW YORK TO CRISTOBAL.* 

Panama P. R. R.. Tuesday Sept. 16 

Allianca P. R. R.. Monday Sept. 22 

Colon P. R. R..Tuesday Sept. 30 

Advance P. R.R.. Monday Oct. 6 

Panama P. R. R. .Saturday Oct. 11 

Allianca P. R. R.. Saturday Oct. 18 

Colon P. R. R.. Friday Oct. 24 

Advance P. R. R. . Thursday Oct. 30 

CRISTOBAL TO NEW YORK.* 

Advance P. R. R.. Monday Sept. 22 

Panama P. R.R.. Sunday Sept. 28 

Allianca P. R. R. Saturday Oct. 4 

Colon P. R. R. .Sunday Oct. 12 

Advance P. R. R. .Saturday Oct. 18 

Panama P. R. R. .Thursday Oct. 23 

Allianca P. R. R.. Thursday Oct. 30 

NEW YORK TO COLON. 

Metapan U. F. C. .Wednesday. .Sept. 10 

Prinz August WUhelm . H.-.'\ Saturday Sept. 13 

Tivives U. F. C. Saturday Sept. 13 

Trent R. M . . . Saturday .... Sept. 13 

Zacapa U. F. C. Wednesday . .Sept. 17 

Emil L. Boas H.-A Saturday Sept. 20 

Sixaola U. F. C. Saturday Sept. 20 

Almirante U. F. C. . Wednesday . . Sept. 24 

Prinz Joachim H.-A Saturday Sept. 27 

Carrillo U. F. C. . Saturday Sept. 27 

Magdalena R. M. . .Saturday Sept. 27 

Santa Marta U. F. C. .Wednesday . .Oct. 1 

CarlSchurz :. .H.-A. .. .Saturday Oct. 4 

Pastores U. F. C. Saturday Oct. 4 

Metapan U. F. C. . Wednesday . . Oct. 8 

Prinz August Wilhelm.H.-.A Saturday Oct. 1 1 

Tivives U.F.C.. Saturday Oct. 11 

Danube R. M . . .Saturday Oct. 11 

COLON TO NEW YORK. 

Santa Marta U. F. C. Thursday Sept. 18 

CarlSchurz H.-A Tuesday Sept. 23 

Pastoris U. F. C. . Tuesday Sept. 23 

Metapan U. F. C. .Thursday Sept. 25 

Danube R. M. . .Tuesday Sept. 30 

Tivives U. F. C. .Tuesday Sept. 30 

Prinz August Wilhelm. H.-A Tuesday Sept. 30 

Zacapa U. F. C. . Thursday .. . .Oct. 2 

Emil L. Boas H.-A Tuesday Oct. 7 

Sixaola U. F. C. .Tuesday Oct. 7 

Almirante U. F. C. . Thursday. ... Oct. 9 . 

Prinz Joachim H.-A Tuesday Oct. 14 

Carrillo U. F. C. . Tuesday Oct. 14 

Tagus R. M . . .Tuesday Oct. 14 

Santa Marta U. F. C. . Thursday Oct. 16 

Pastores U. F. C. . Tuesday Oct. 21 

Carl Schurz H.-A Tuesday Oct. 21 

Metapan U. F. C. .Thursday Oct. 23 

Prinz August Wilhelm.H.-A Tuesday Oct. 28 

Tivives U. F. C. . Tuesday Oct. 28 

Oruba R. M . . .Tuesday Oct. 28 

NEW ORLEANS TO COLON. 

Turrialba U. F. C. . Saturday Sept. 13 

Cartago U. F. C. .Wednesday . .Sept. 17 

Abangarez TJ. F. C. . Saturday Sept. 20 

Heredia U. F. C. . Wednesday . .Sept. 24 

Atenas U. F. C. . Saturday Sept. 27 

Parismina U. F. C. . Wednesday . . Oct. 1 

Turrialba U. F. C. .Saturday Oct. 4 

COLON TO NEW ORLEANS. 

Atenas U. F. C. .Thursday Sept. 18 

Parismina U. F. C. . Saturday .... Sept. 20 

Turrialba U. F. C. . Thursday Sept. 25 

Cartago U. F. C. . Saturday Sept. 27 

Abangarez U. F. C. . Thursday Oct. 2 

Heredia U. F. C. Saturday Oct. 4 

♦Amended schedule, covering temporary withdrawal 
of the Alliania for repairs. 



Tide Table. 

The following table shows the time of high and low 
tides at Panama for the week ending September 27. 1913 



Date. ' 


High 


, Low 


High 


Low 


Hlfch 


Sept. 21 


A.M. 


A.M. 

12.42 
1.20 
2.05 
3.05 
4.27 
5.50 

6,58 


A.M. 

6.40 

7.18 

8.05 

9.06 

10.25 

11 51 

P.M. 

1,05 


P.M. 
1.09 
1.53 
2.45 

3.42 
5.10 
6.22 

7.2.1 


P.M. 
7.05 


Sept 2"^ 




7.48 


Sept. 23 




8.45 


Sept 24. 




9.55 


Sept. 25 




11.20 


Sept. 26 

Sept. 27 


12.38 





75th meridian time. 



CANAL 




RECORD 



Volume VII. 



ANCON, CANAL ZONE, WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 24, 1913. 



No. 5. 



The Canal Record 

Published weekly under the authority and supervision of 
the Isthmian Canal Commission. 



The Canal Record ts published free of charge, one copy 
each to all employes of the Commission and Panama 
Railroad Company whose names are on the gold roll. 
Extra copies and ba'k numbers can be obtained from the 
new stands of the Panama Railroad Company for five 
cents each. 



Address all Communications, 

THE CANAL RECORD. 

Ancon. Canal Zone, 

Isthmus of Panama. 

No tommunication, either for publication or requesting 
information will receive attention unless signed with the 
full name and address of the writer. 

NOTES OF PROGRESS. 



Reservation Established. 

The land between Gatun and Gamboa, e.\- 
tending from the Canal on the west to the 
Canal Zone boundary- line on the east, has 
been declared a reservation within the mean- 
ing of the E.xecutive Order of April 17, 1912, 
and notices will be posted against trespassing 
on same. In addition, the chief of police has 
been instructed to have the people living at 
Frijoles and Monte Lirio notified verbally 
that the reservation has been created, and 
that they will not be permitted to continue 
the cultivation of land within this area. 
Practically all the privately owned land in this 
section has been adjudicated, and is now the 
property of the United States. The towns 
of Frijoles and Monte Lirio will not be in- 
cluded within the reservation at this time. 



Tracic Connection Removed from Center Wall of 

Gatun Locl(s. 

Forces of the .Atlantic Division began on 
September 4 the removal of the trestle across 
the west side of the upper approach to the 
Gatun Locks, by which railway connection 
had been maintained with the center wall. 
The wall is thus left in traffic isolation, except 
for the portage of materials across the tops 
of completed lock gates, or from vessels 
which may come alongside the approach 
walls, extendinij out from the center wall 
at the upper and lower ends of the locks, or 
from the cableways across the lower approach 
wall. .A locomotive crane of 35 tons capacity 
has been left on the center wall, and is able 
to travel the length of the locks, traversing 
the inclines between levels under the control 
of block and tackle. The present use of the 
crane is in the completion of the lamp post 
erection, placing of machinery, handling 
cable, etc. The placing of the trusses for 
the roof of the control house began on Sep- 
tember 4, and cement . sand, rock, and vitreous 
roofing tile have been stored on the top of the 
center wall in quantities sufficient for the com- 



pletion of the building. The heavy operating 
machinery for the center wall is all in place, 
with the exception of some of the chain fender 
equipment, and the towing locomotives. All 
the lamp posts for the center approach walls 
have been erected, not more than 10 of the 
207 lamp posts required for all three walls 

of the locks at Gatun remaining to be placed. 

♦ 

Changes at Pedro Miguel Yard. 

The south end of the railroad yard at Pedro 
Miguel will be flooded when the water in 
Miraflores Lake reaches elevation 27 feet 
above sealevel, in view of which, the work of 
taking up all unnecessary trackage was begun 
on August 30. The old car repair shop, op- 
posite the engine house, which is within the 
area to be inundated, will be moved to Bal- 
boa, and a new system of car repair tracks, 
using old material, will be installed. 

The engine house will be dismantled also, 
and the removal of the machines therein was 
begun on September 11. The mechanical 
work heretofore performed there has been 
transferred to the Empire shops. The engines 
formerly hostled at Pedro Miguel will here- 
after be apportioned between a yard on the 
east bank of the Camil, and Balboa. 



PERMANENT BUILDINGS. 



Sale of Towboat "Exotic." 

Bids for the purchase of the steel hull, stern 
wheel towboat Exotic were opened at the 
office of the Depot Quartermaster on Tuesday, 
September 2. Three offers were received, 
as follows: Chicago House Wrecking Com- 
pany, Sl.OOO; N. Chr. Hansen, $2,000; and 
A. Van Sciver, $3,500. Award was made to 
Mr. Van Sciver of Pearl Lagoon, Nicaragua. 
The vessel is of 150 gross tons, was built by 
Pusey and Jones of Wilmington, Del., and 
was shipped to the Isthmus knocked down, 
arriving here on December 29, 1908. It 
was erected at the dry dock shops and cost 
complete, about $40,000. In the service of 
the Canal Commission, it was used principally 
as a towboat in the French canal between 
Cristobal and Gatun. 



Erection of Traclt-span Bridges for Transmis- 
sion Line. 

The first of the track span bridges, to be 
erected along the main line of the Panama 
railroad, from Cristobal to Balboa, to support 
the transmission line from the Gatun hydro- 
electric station, was set on its concrete pedes- 
tals on September 22. This bridge is situated 
on the relocated line of the railroad, above 
Paraiso Junction, at about mile post 39. 
Erection of other bridges is to proceed as 
rapidly as they are put together by the forces 
of the United States Steel Products Company- 
The foundation piers havebeen installed along 

the line between Pedro Miguel and Frijoles. 
.« 

The low area lying between the new ad- 
ministration building and the Central Di- 
vision dump tracks, near E^st Balboa, will be 
filled in by the Central Division forces. 



Family Quarters on Sosa Hill will be First to 
be Erected. 

The preparation of plans for permanent 
family quarters for gold employes at the new 
town of Balboa will be begun shortly in the 
office of the Canal Commission architect. 
The family quarters to be considered first will 
probably be those for employes whose salaries 
are under $200 a month; afterwards, those 
for employes receiving about $200 a month, 
and lastly those for employes whose salaries 
are from $200 to $400 a month. The types 
will be based upon one and two-family houses. 

It is the present plan to begin the con- 
struction of permanent family quarters on the 
northeast slope of Sosa Hill as soon as prac- 
ticable, and the landscape architect is now 
engaged in laying out roads in this area. It 
is not intended to encroach for the present on 
the labor camp in this locality, but eventually 
some of the laborers' barracks, namely, those 
that are in good condition will be moved to 
the new silver camp at La Boca. The new 
family quarters on Sosa Hill are primarily de- 
signed to take care of the employes at the 
Balboa shops and terminal. 

Permanent buildings cannot be erected on 
the area recently filled in between Sosa and 
Ancon Hills for some time to come. In the 
meantime, grading will be done and per- 
manent roads and walks laid out in this area, 
as well as on the slope of Ancon Hill in the 
rear of the new administration building. The 
employes in the administration building, now 
under construction, will be cared for indefi- 
nitely in existing quarters ac Ancon, and in 
Corczal. It is not proposed to erect perma- 
nentquartersfor goldbacheloremployes at the 
present time, as the houses recently recon- 
structed at East Balboa will be available for 
their use during the next few years. 

The hotel at East Balboa will take care of 
the bachelor employes quartered in that vicin- 
ity indefinitely. A permanent hotel, however, 
ma>- be erected later, and space will be reserved 
for it. The East Balboa commissary- will be 
continued in use,but a permanent commissary 
building will probably be among the first of 
the miscellaneous buildings to be erected. It 
is expected that provision will have to be made 
for a police station and office of district judge, 
as well as a fire station and schoolhouse, as 
soon as it is safe to erect buildings on the filled 
ground. The building recently reerected at 
East Balboa for a post-office will serve for 
some time, and the present office and store- 
house of the district quartermaster may remain 
indefinitely, although space will be- reserved 
for a permanent building in the new town. A 
permanent dispensary' will probably be re- 
quired by the Sanitary Department, as well 
as accommodations for the local sanitary in- 
spector. The larvacide factory, now at Ancon, 
will remain where it is for the present. Pro- 
vision will be made for a clubhouse, but it is 



34 



THE CANAL RECORD 



Vol. VII, No. 5. 



not yet known whether the new clubhouse will 
be of a permanent type of construction, or 
whether the one at Empire will be available. 

The settlement at Ancon will be continued 
indefinitely. There are 94 buildings in that 
district available for the permanent force, not 
including quarters in the Ancon Hospital 
grounds, French houses now used as quarters, 
or undesirable types, but including nine houses 
of the official type. These houses will provide 
quarters for 161 families and 130 bachelors, 
counting one man to a room. At East Balboa, 
there is a total of 19 buildings accommodating 
28 families and 188 bachelors. With two ex- 
ceptions, all of these buildings are within the 
limits of the proposed Marine Corps reserva- 
tion, and as the site of the reservation is prob- 
ably permanently fixed, the houses will have 
to be moved. No additional buildings will be 
moved to East Balboa from towns along the 
Canal at present. 

ORGANIZATION FOR PERMANENT BUILDINGS. 

The organization for the construction of 
the permanent Canal buildings has been ap- 
proved and is, as follows: 

PLANS AND DRAWINGS. 

Cold organization — One architect, one archi- 
tect's superintendent, one structural drafts- 
man, six designers and draftsmen, four drafts- 
men, one junior draftsman. Total, 14. 

CEMENT TILE MANUFACTURE. 

Gold organization — One general foreman, 
two foremen. Total, 3. 

Silver organization' — Two foremen, one en- 
gineer, one mixer, 20 machine operators, 30 
laborers. Total, 54. 

CONSTRUCTION. 

Cold organization — One resident engineer, 
four superintendents, two transitmen or 
junior engineers, two rodmen, one general 
property clerk, four assistant property clerks, 
three clerks, one general mason foreman, one 
general carpenter foreman, two general plumb- 
ing foremen, one general electrical foreman, 
one general sheet metal foreman, one general 
roofing foreman, one general plaster and 
stucco foreman, one general metal lath fore- 
man, one general foreman painter, one general 
•teel erecting foreman, one general marble and 
tile setting foreman; five foremen on mason 
work, 10 on carpenter work, three on electrical 
work, two on sheet metal work, five on roof- 
ing work, five on plaster and stucco work, 
three on metal lath work, three on painting, 
five on marble and tile setting work, 20 
plumbers, 30 electricians, 10 sheet metal 
workers, five hoisting engineers, two black- 
smiths. Total, 135. 

Silver organization — One hundred masons, 
200 carpenters, 60 roofers, 100 plasterers, 
30 metal lathers, 30 painters, 20 tile setters, 
20 plumbers, 30 electrical helpers, four black- 
smith helpers, 30 steel erectors, five hoisting 
engineers, three clerks, 260 laborers. Total, 
892. Grand total, 1,068. 

The above force will be under the Quar- 
termaster's Department, but will not be em- 
ployed for some time to come, as plans for 
the permanent quarters and miscellaneous 
buildings have not yet been prepared. 

♦ 

Change in Porto Bello Tug Service. 

Effective September 21, the Sunday tug 
from Cristobal to Porto Bello will leave Dock 
16 at 5.30 p. m.. Instead of 7 p. m., and arrive 
at Porto Bello at 7.30 p. m. Returning, it 
will leave Porto Bello at 7.30 p. m., and arrive 
at Dock 16 at 9.30 p. m. 



JOINT LAND COMMISSION. 



Additional Awards. 

The following additional awards have been 

made by the Joint Land Commission: 

Award No. 30 — In the matter of the itaim of Las 
Cascadas Estates Company, Ltd., for the property des- 
ignated as Bohio Soldado y Buena Vista — An award is 
hereby made against the United States of America for 
the estate of Bohio Soldado y Buena Vista, said award 
to include all right, title, and interest of any persons to 
the entire estate not heretofore acquired by the United 
States, together with all claims for improvements of 
whatsoever nature on the part of the owners of said 
estate, and all rights claimed by them, in the sum of 
$3,500. 

This award shall be paid to the claimant hereinafter 
named, in the amount herein specified, on or before the 
second day of October. 1913, and if payment or tender 
of payment of this award is not made on or before that 
date, said award shall thereafter bear interest at the 
rate of six per centum per annum until paid. 

To the Las Cascadas Estates Company. L.imited. of 
London. England, for all of their right, claim, and in- 
terest in the estate of Bohio Soldado y Buena \'ista 
not heretofore accjuired by the United States, together 
with all improvements which are claimed by the said 
company, the sum of S3,S00. 

(Signed) Federico Boyd. Roland P. Falkner. 
Sa.mi;el Lewis, L. S. Rowe. Commissioners. 

September 2. 1913. 

A ward No. 31 — In the matter of the claim of Jacob 
KoZLalski for buildings in the town of Corgona — On 
April 7, 1913, Jacob Kowalski filed ivith the Joint 
Land Commission a claim (Docket No. 121) for certain 
buildings in the town of Gorgona. The evidence sub- 
mitted to the Commission shows that pursuant to a 
petition filed by the claimant in this case, the munici- 
pality of Gorgona. under date of January 26. 1907, 
passed the following resolution: 

GORGO.VA. 

Resolution No. 17 of 1907. 
"By which authority is granted for the lease of 
municipal lands for building purposes within the 
municipality of Gorgona. 

"The mayor and municipal council of the munici- 
pality of Gorgona. in view of the petition of Jacob 
Kowalslci for the lease of 3,000 square feet of va- 
cant municipal land in the town of Gorgona for the 
purpose of erecting a dwelling, the lot of land 
bounded, as follows: On the north by the old 
French canal line, east, house owned by James 
Bailey, south, house owned by William Wood, 
west, open land and Juan Grande labor camps. 

"It is resolved that the above application be 
granted subject to the approval of ordinance No. 
5 of 1905. 

Approved January 26. 1907. 

(Siened) E. M. Robinson, 

Mayor of Gorgona. 

Approved Februar>' 1907. 

Executive Secretary,'^ 
Counsel for the United States laid emphasis on the 
fact that no document leasing this land was issued to 
the claimant. The evidence before the Commission 
clearly indicates that the municipality of Gorgona at 
no time issued such documents and that the established 
practice was to regard the occupancy of the land in 
pursuance of the passage of a municipal ordinance as 
sufficient to establish the relationship of landlord and 
tenant. In the answer of the United States to this 
claim, much stress was also laid on the fact that the 
claimant after the passage of this ordinance made in- 
quiries of the Executive Secretary at .\ncon with refer- 
ence to the number of years that he would probably be 
permitted to occupy this land, in view of the ultimate 
flooding of the town of Gorgona by the rising of the 
waters of Lake Gatun. These inquiries in no way affect- 
ed the acceptance of the lease, and the fact that the 
claimant proceeded with the erection of the building 
shortly after the passage of the ordinance is conclusive 
on this point. 

In January, 1908, the claimant was required to sign 
a new lease issued in the name of Governor Blackburn, 
then Head of the Department of Civil Administration. 
This lease was made to run from July, 1907 to July. 
1908, and contained a revocation clause usual to 
Isthmian Canal Commission leases. This lease was 
renewed on November 10, 1908, by E. M. Robinson, 
tax collector of Gorgona. and was to run for a period 
of three years from July 1, 1908. 

In 1910, the Chairman and Chief Engineer of the 
Isthmian Canal Commission decided that the land 
upon which the building of the present claimant was 
erected, was required for purposes of Canal construc- 
tion, and notice was -sent to Kowalski to remove his 
building. A mass of correspondence has been sub- 
mitted to the Commission, involving certain offers made 
by the Isthmian Canal Commission tS'tlie' cla'fmant, 
to take down his house and transport -the ^nateria'l to 



Gatun. !t is not necessary to give further consideration 
to this correspondence, as its throws no light upon the 
main question under consideration, namely, whether 
this claimant had acquired any right to compensation 
for the value of his building, and whether this right, 
was ignored at the time of the removal of the building. 

This case is governed by the principles formulated by 
this Commission in the opinion on the demurrer of the 
jurisdiction of the Commission in the matter of the 
claim of Juan Sotillo. This claimant became a tenant 
of the municipality of Gorgona by operation of reso- 
lution No. 17. dated January 26. 1907. and. acting un- 
der the rights granted to him by this resolution, im- 
mediately proceeded to the erection of a building. 
These facts clearly entitle him to the protection of Ar- 
ticle 5 of Law No. 50, dated November 6, 1894. In 
forming its conclusion as to the amount of the award 
to be made in this case, the Commission estimated the 
value of the building before its removal, and deducted 
therefrom the value of the material which was subse- 
quently turned over to Mr. Kowalski. 

In accordance with the evidence submitted in this 
case, and with the principles formulated in thig opinion, 
an award is hereby made against the United States of 
America to Jacob Kowalski for the settlement of all 
right, title, and interest in the buildings in the town 
of Gorgona erected by the claimant on lot leased to the 
Said claimant by resolution No. 17 of the municipality 
of Gorgona. dated January 26. 1907. together with all 
claims for improvements of whatsoever nature, in the 
sum of Sff.OOO. 

This award shall be paid to the said Jacob Kowalski 
on or before the third day of October, 1913, and if pay- 
ment, or tender of payment, is not made on or before 
that date, the amount of this award shall thereafter 
bear interest at the rate of sLx per centum per annum 
until paid. 

(Signed) Federico Boyd, Roland P. Falkner. 
Samuel Lewis. L. S. Rovve, Commissioners. 

September •?, 1913. 



Ancon Crusher. 

The following is a statement of rock 
crushed at Ancon quarry during the two weeks 
ending September 20: 



DATE. 


Cubic 
yards. 


Hours 
worked. 


Sept. 8 


2.01S 
2.168 
1,614 
2.500 
1.703 
1.919 


7. 25 


Sept. 9 . . 




6.50 


Sept. 10. .. 




7.30 


Sipt. 11 


7 IS 


Sept. 12 


7.45 


Sept. 13 


8 20 








Total . . . 


11 919 


45 OS 



.Sept. 15. 
Sept. 16. 
Sept. 17. 
Sept. 18. 
Sept. 19. 
Sept. 20, 

Total. 



1.5S3 
2.332 
1.892 
1.341 
2.174 
1.607 



10,929 



6 25 

7 OS 
7 IS 
7,40 
7,1s 
6 35 



42 IS 



Work of Lidgerwood Unloaders in August. 

During the month of August, the following 
Lidgerwood trains and cars were unloaded 
by the Central Division: 



LOCAIION. 


No. of 
unloaders. 


No. of 

trains. 


No. of 
cars. 


Balboa 


4 
1 
4* 


949 
186 
892 


19,929 


Miraflores 


3.906 




18,7.?2 






Total . . 


9 


2.027 


42,567 



*One unloader worked 24 days. 



Balboa Sand Service. 

Arepcit of sand shipped from Balboa during 
the month of Aurust follows: 



Destination. 


Number 
cars. 


Cubic 
yards. 




451 - 

8 

112 

99 

364 

o 

5 


8.533 


First Division, 


120 
2,SR2 




1,945 


Fortificotions 'Division 

Quartermaster's Department, , , 
Individuals-and companies 


6,364 

75 

115 


Total '."'.■.' .■^.''.. 


' 1.042 


19,734 



-The purehase'of a .30,000-pound double- 
cyliri'derroa-drbller -for the use of the Division 
of M^ihicipal Engineering ha.s been authorized. 



September 24, 1913. 



THE CANAL RECORD 



35 



SOCIAL HISTORY OF GORGONA. 



Settlement Early Took the Lead in Recreation 
and Amusements. 

With the passing of the village of Gorgona 
one of the most active settlements in the Canal 
Zone, from a social standpoint, has ceased to 
exist. When the Americans took possession of 
the Canal Zone in 1904, there were 40 French 
houses in the villaa;e. To this number the . 
Commission added 51 dwellings of the various 
authorized types, together with office build- 
ings, until the village in 1912 attained a 
population of about 3,500. 

In 1905, when there were not 20 Ameri- 
can families in Gorgona, an association of 
men and women was organized under the 
title of the House to House Social Club. 
This club met at the homes of the membei s for 
a social evening once a week. As its mem- 
bership increased, a gramophone was pur- 
chased to supply music for dancing, and the 
organization resolved itself into a- dancingclub. 
The meetings were then held in the social 
hall over the hotel every Saturday evening. 
Religious ser\ices, conducted by the Rever- 
end J. L. Wise, Baptist preacher, who was 
one of the earliest residents of the village, 
were held in the old French court house, 
which was situated near the railroad. In 
1907, the Commission clubhouse was erected 
on the elevation just back of the site of the 
courthouse. 

On Thanksgiving Day, 1905, a Sunday 
school was organized, its membership being 
composed of young men and women; there 
were no children of school age in the village 
at that time. On Christmas Day, 1906, the 
American children of the village enjoyed the 
novelty of having a fruit-bearing orange tree 
as a Christmas tree. The entertainment was 
held in the French courthouse and all the 
people in the village took part. Gifts were 
presented to each child present and the even- 
ing was spent in singing "home" songs and 
hymns. This was the first community 
Christmas in Gorgona. It was followed by 
others each year which were held in the Com- 
mission clubhouse. These community cele- 
brations in which the Young Men's Christian 
Association, the woman's club, the Sunday 
school, and church organizations united, were 
noteworthy through the hearty cooperation 
of the social forces of the village. More than 
1,500 children participated in the entertain- 
ments and over 31,000 was expended by the 
people of the community in the purchase of 
Christmas trees and ornaments, presents for 
the children, and their entertainment. 

In 1906, the young people of the church or- 
ganized a Christian Endeavor society which 
constituted an important part of the social 
life of the village lor three years. The society, 
besides its own meetings on Sunday evenings, 
contributed to the public entertainment by 
holding a "social" once a month to which all 
the people of the village were invited. 

The idea of the woman's club movement in 
the Canal Zone originated in Gorgona, and 
from that village came the suggestion to the 
United States Government to authorize the 
organization of women's clubs as social 
centers for American women in the Canal 
Zone. In June, 1907, a social club of women 
was formed, the first woman's club in the 
Canal Zone. 

The Isthmian Canal Chapter. No. 1 , Daugh- 
ters of Rebekah, was organized in Gorgona in 
1907, its membership being composed of 



women from the various villages along the 
line of the Panama railroad. In April, 1913, 
the order had 90 members. The Odd Fellows 
celebrated their anniversaries in Gorgona 
with much success, the people of the village 
preparing for the entertainments. In 1911, 
Orchid Chapter, No. 1, Order of the Eastern 
Star, was organized in Gorgona, headquarters 
being held there until early in the spring of 
1913, when it moved to Empire. It had 87 
members. 

In 1910, a representative of the National 
Anti-Cigarette League, with headquarters in 
Chicago, visited the Isthmus and organized 
a branch at Gorgona, which maintained 
a membership of 30 until it was disbanded. 
The Boy Scout movement followed as an 
outcome of it, and, led by the physical director 
of the Young Men's Christian Association, 
Gorgona had the largest membership in the 
Boy Scouts of any patrol in the Canal Zone 
organization. There was also an active 
chapter of the Canal Zone Red Cross. 

In 1909 and 1910, Gorgona had a dramatic 
company which gave plays in the local club- 
house, and traveled through the clubhouse 
circuit with much success, giving also a 
comedy in the National Theatre, Panama, 
as a benefit performance. 

In bowling and basketball, Gorgona's teams 
played an active part in all interclubhouse 
tournaments. The bowling team of 1908 
won a handsome silver cup through its skill. 
In the 1911 games the basketball team was the 
strongest and fastest in the league. In indoor 
baseball, the Gorgona team was a pennant 
winner for several seasons, and for several 
years the town had a team in the Isthmian 
baseball league. 

There were three functions in which the 
entire village took part; the first was a ban- 
quet by Gorgona Te.xans in 1907; the second 
was a farewell Fourth of July banquet held 
on July 3, 1912; and the third was a reunion 
held in the clubhouse on July 25, 1913, which 
was attended by the largest number of people 
ever gathered there. 



somely bound book. The first contest was 
won by Miss Sarah Widener of Gatun. 



Church Notes. 

The sixth anniversary of the opening of the 
Baptist Church in Culebra was celebrated 
by special services on Sunday and Monday, 
September 14 and 15. The pastor was assist- 
ed in the services on Monday evening by the 
Rev. Carl H. Elliott of Cristobal, and the Rev. 
Stephen Witt of Gatun. 

Father James McDonald, a priest of the 
Order of St. Vincent, from the community 
house at Germantown, Pennsylvania, has 
been appointed to be assistant priest in the 
parish of St. Ferdinand, Empire. Father 
McDonald has arrived on the Isthmus and 
taken up his duties. He visited the Isthmus 
several years ago as a missioner and organized 
the Woman's Altar Guild of St. Ferdinand's 
Church. 



Prize Essays. 

The second in the series of prize contests 
for the best essay of 150 words by boys and 
girls under 16 years of age is announced in 
the Union Church Work of Cristobal, the 
bulletin which is published weekly by the 
pastor of the church. The subject is "What 
would you do with §10,000,000 if it were given 
to you to invest in philanthropic or religious 
enterprises ?" The prize offered is a" hand- 



Playgrounds in Permanent Towns. 

Suitable playgrounds for children will be 
provided in the permanent towns of Balboa, 
Pedro Miguel, Gatun, and Cristobal, and 
Mr. A. B. Dickson, Mr. Frank P. Wagg, and 
Mr. William L. Phillips have been apppinted 
a committee to submit a report, together 
with their recommendations, relative thereto. 



PERSONAL. 



Dr. L. S. Rowe, one of the two American 
members of the Joint Land Commission ap- 
pointed to settle claims against the United 
States arising out of the construction of the 
Panama Canal, sailed for New York, on 
Tuesday, September 23, on the United Fruit 
Company's steamer Paslores, having resigned 
from the Commission, effective upon his ar- 
rival in the United States. He was appointed 
by Executive Order of the President on Janu- 
ary 24, 1913, with the understanding that 
he would not be required to remain on the 
Isthmus for a longer period than six months. 
He expects to return to his professorhip in 
the University of Pennsylvania. 

Mr. Frank P. Wagg, superintendent of 
schools, returned on the Advance on Tuesday, 
September 16 from his annual leave of ab- 
sence. 



Colored Clubhouse Converted to Other Uses. 

The one-story building in Culebra, formerly 
used as a clubhouse for colored men, has 
been converted into offices for the district 
sanitary inspector and the municipal engineers. 
The building was opened for the colored 
men on November 3, 1911, and its use for 
that purpose was continued until the spring 
of 1913. 



High School Entrance Examinations. 

High school entrance examinations will be 
held at the Ancon white school building on 
Monday, September 29, at 8.30 a. m. Eighth 
grade pupils who failed to pass last June will 
have an opportunity at this time to take an- 
other e.vamination in the subjects in which 
they failed. 

Frank P. Wagg, 
Superintendent of Schools. 



Association of Panama Canal liuilders. 
In making application for membership in 
the Association of Panama Canal Builders, 
the secretary-treasurer requests that, in ad- 
dition to forwarding the S5 initiation fee, the 
following information be invariably furnished: 
1. Name. 2. Metal check number. 3. Gang 
number. 4. Division, department, or Pana- 
ma Railroad Company. 5. Room number. 
6. Houie number. 7. Location of work. 8. 
Post-office address. 9. Address in United 
States. 10. Isthmian address. 



Sojourners Lodge. 
The meeting of Sojourners Lodge, A. F, 
and A. M., Cristobal, called for Wednesday 
evening, September 24, has been postponed 
until Saturday, September 27. 

^^ 

Almost 9,000,000 feet of lumber were re- 
ceived on the Isthmus during the month of 
August. This is the largest amount of lumber 
received in any one month during the entire 
history of the Canal. 

♦ 

.'^n informal dance will be held at the 
Strangers Club on Thursday, September 25. 



3(5 



THE CANAL RECORD 



Vol. Y 1 1, No. S. 



FOUR YEARS OF LOCK WORK. 



Locks Almost Ready for Use. — Operating Mechan- 
ism Correspondingly Complete. 

The placing of concrete in the locks of the 
Canal has covered a period of approximately 
four years. It began on August 24, 1909, 
at Gatun; on September 1, 1909, at Pedro 
Miguel; and, with the exception of 102 cubic 
yards laid in 1909, at Miraflores in July, 1910. 
The end of the fourth year sees the concrete 
work at all locks practically completed. 

Mass masonry at Gatun and Miraflores 
Locks was completed in the latter part of 
May, 1913, and at Pedro Miguel Lock, several 
months earlier. 

The work at Gatun since September 1, 1912, 
has comprised building the lower wing and 
approach walls, and completing the upper 
approach wall, which was within three per 
cent of completion a year ago. 

At Pedro Miguel, during the same period 
the approach and wing walls at the upper end 
and the east wing wall at the lower end, were 
built, and the lower approach wall was extend- 
ed about 300 feet. 

At Miraflores, the lower lock, which was 
about half done on September 1, 1912, was 
brought to completion, and the wing and ap- 
proach walls at both entrances were begun 
and completed. 

Recent and future concrete work at the 
locks embraces a multitude of relatively small 
finishing operations around machinery and 
tracks, etc. Portable mixers are being used in 
the remaining construction. All of the large 
mixing and placing plants have been closed 
and are being dismantled. The two bermand 
four chamber cranes empleyed at Pedro Mi- 
guel Locks, from April, 1910, were trans- 
ferred to Miraflores Locks, upon the comple- 
tion of the heavy masonry in the lock proper, 
and of the filling of the center wall; and the 
permanent mi.xing plant was dismantled after 
the approach and flare walls had been built. 
All of the berm and chamber cranes used at 
Pedro Miguel were transferred to Miraflores 
Locks and placed in service there between 
April, 1911, and March 26, 1912; two other 
berm cranes, used first at Miraflores, began 
work in April, 1911. Final dismantling of 
these cranes began the latter part of July, 
1913, and is still under way. The auxiliary 
concrete mixing plant at Gatun Locks, in 
service from December 31, 1909, to March 11, 

1912, and the permanent plant, operated from 
August 24, 1909, until August 16, 1913, were 
dismantled immediately after being closed. 

The progress of masonry construction at 
all locks, from its beginning to September 1, 

1913, is indicated by this summary of monthly 
placements 



LOCK GATES. 

Over half of the material in the lock gatw 
was erected during the past 12 months. On 
September 1, 1912, the total quantity erected 
at all locks was 24,787 tons, or 42 per cent of 
the required 58,000 tons; today, the lack of 
completeness of erection is designated by 
fractions of one per cent. Since September 20, 
the gates of the west flight at Gatun, and the 
east flight at Pedro Miguel, have been ready 
for the passage of vessels, and the west flight 
at Miraflores T.ocks is to be similarly com- 
pleted by the end of the month. All gates at 
Gatun and Pedro Miguel are to be mechanical- 
ly completed by January 1, and at Miraflores 
by March 1, 1914. 

Gate work at the locks began on March 21, 
1911, in preparing the bearings for the upper 
guard gates at Gatun. The erection of these 
leaves began on May 17, 1911, and they were 
the first to be swung closed. This occurred on 
August 4, 1912, and the footwalk over them 
was completed in September, 1912. A year 
ago, all the leaves in the upper and intermedi- 
ate levels at Gatun had been erected to full 
height, and work had just begun on the safety 
gates in the lower level and the lower guard 
gates. The first girders for these eight leaves 
were placed on August 29, 30, and 31, 1912; 
the lower guard gates were closed, and sea 
water admitted against them, on June 14, 
1913. On September 1, 1913, erection, ream- 
inj, and riveting for the gates of Gatun Locks 
were all within less than one-half of one per 
cent of completion. 

At Pedro Miguel, gate work began at the 
upper guard gates, on August 7, 1911. On 
September 1, 1912, these gates had just been 
closed, the skeletons of all leaves were at full 
height, and those in the upper level had been 
sheathed. Today, erection and reaming for 
all gates are within one per cent of completion, 
and the finishing work is over SO per cent com- 
pleted. 

At Miraflores Locks, work on the gates be- 
gan first on the upper guard gates and the 
safety gates of the upper level, in August, 1912. 
The upper guard gates were closed about the 
middle of June, 1913, and the lower guard 
gates on August 20. 1913. At present, all 28 
leaves have been erected to full height, ream- 
ing is 98.5 per cent completed, riveting, 90 
per cent, and finishing, about 65 per cent 
completed. 

The local force of the McClintic-Marshall 
Construction Company, the contractor for the 
fabrication and erection of the lock gates, was 
134 men in May, 1911, at the beginning of 
erection. It attained a maximum of about 
5,300 men, 625 of whom were gold em- 
ployes, during the months of March, April, 
and May, 1913. The force on September 22, 



1913, was 1,940 men, 225 of whom were 
gold employes. 

EMERGENCY DAMS. 

The emergency dams are to be held in re- 
serve for exigencies if the lock gates should 
get beyond control and allow a rush of water 
through the flight. The floating caisson 
dams are for use only when the water is under 
control, and are not attached to the lock 
structures; the first of these is now under 
fabrication at the Union Iron Works at 
San Francisco, and will be towed to the Isth- 
mus when completed. 

The placing of steel in the emergency dams 
began in August, 1912, with the laying of the 
circular track and pivotal base for the east 
dam at Gatun. Erection of superstructure 
proceeded directly thereafter and the dam was 
completed, except for final painting, in May, 
1913. The contractor, the United States 
Steel Products Company, began the final 
operating tests on May 20, under supervision 
of testing engineers of the Canal Commission. 
Erection of the west dam at Gatun began 
about the middle of November, 1912, and 
tests were completed on August 15, 1913. 
This dam was swung across the chamber, and 
its wickets and gates dropped into place, in 
35 minutes. Trained operators will be able 
to do this in 30 minutes, or less. 

At Pedro Miguel, erection of the west dam 
was undertaken first, beginning on Febr^iary 
1, 1913. This structure was first swung across 
the approach chamber on September 2, and is 
now under test. Erection of the east dam, 
which began on April 1, is about 98 per cent 
completed, and the structure will be ready for 
testing by the time the tests on the west dam 
are completed. 

The Miraflores east dam erection began on 
June 1, and that for the west dam on July 1. 
All material for all of the dams, weighing a 
total of 13,400 tons, had arrived on the Isth- 
mus by August 1, and erection was 80 per cent 
completed on September 1, being practically 
confined to the two dams at Miraflores. 
These are slightly lighter than those at Gatun 
and Pedro Miguel, because of the lower head 
of water against which they will be used; each 
of them weighs approximately, 1,987 tons, 
as compared with 2,305 tons at Pedro Miguel 
and Gatun Locks. The east dam at Mira- 
flores will be finished the latter part of October, 
and the west dam in November. The emer- 
gency dams were described in The Canal 
Record of March 8. 1911. 

OPERATIXG MACHINERY. 

In addition to the masonry, gates, and 
emergency dams there is a great amount of 
auxiliary machinery contained within the 
machinery rooms and operating galleries of 
the walls or in the culverts. This apparatus 







Gatun Locks. 






Pedro Miguel Lock. 






Miraflores Locks. 




Months. 


1909. 


1910. 


1911. 


1912. 


1913. 


1909. 


1910. 


1911 


1912. 


1913. 


1909. 


191C. 


1911. 


1912. 


1913 






54.136 
55.696 
60,998 
63.227 
74.273 
89.401 
84,001 
85,686 
76.720 
86,949 
75.152 
80.212 


72.919 
72,103 
86.88-1 
67.361 
67,844 
55,03: 
71,046 
66,928 
57.298 
53.636 
43.90? 
43.59( 


34.983 

26.664 

27,532 

11,600 

7.746 

6.095 

8.093 

6.855 

3,162 

3,252 

6,029 

S.69-, 


28,085 

30 780,1 


16.273 
13.218 
18.793 
24.52i 
29.57(, 
30.631 
41.46s 
51.26-. 
50.70. 
61.422 
64.248 
42.834 


38.513 
37.011 
44.716 
28.635 
19.135 
18.213 
19.906 
20.736 
15.379 
25.637 
19.622 
14.360 


15.003 
12,63'- 
9.331 
9.46( 
10.73' 
10.061 
11.480 
5.995 
3.039 
6.587 
7.972 
6.95; 


4.652 
4.294 
13.412 
2.145 
1,144 
773 
1.829 
1.884 






■"•■28 

74 


"i46 

314 

13 

27 

1,603 

3,67^ 

6,031 

18,133 

22,159 

23,871 

21,533 


24.0U 

20.89f, 
31.173 
38.758 
36.154 
26.536 
32.840 
57,003 
56.08.- 
60.>t7, 
41./2I 
48.77 


48,416 

63.893 

S3.70<, 

97.73; 

92.09. 

68.39 

66.02. 

75.3^ 

46.12 

54.7V 

39.8. 

46,7., 

783, U 


50,456 


February 




34,979 


March 




48,180 
22,732 
13,046 
5,509 
3,431 
6,258 


2.37C 
8,M( 

10,16'. 

13,00. 


2 1 ,030 


April 




13,266 


May 




6,956 


June 




3.836 


July 




3,810 


August 


1.298 
12.294 
29.378 
30.270 
42.832 


3.643 


September 




October 




























Total 


116.072 


886.451 


758.821 


147. 70f 


158,021 


33,85t 


444.947 


301.893 


109.26. 


30,133 


102 


97.501 


474,83. 


.37.976 



Grand totals to September I, 1913, : Gatun, 2,067,073 cable yards ; Pedro Miguel, 930,090 cubic yards : Miraflores, 1,493,600 cubic yards. 



S»pt*mb0r 24, 1913. 



THE CANAL RECORD 



i1 



embraces the rising stem gate valves, which 
control the flow of water in the 18-foot cul- 
verts at the bottoms of the side and center 
walls; the cylindrical valves, controlling 
the 6-foot culverts which run laterally from the 
wall culverts and pass water to the lock 
chambers, through the floors; the auxiliary 
culvert valve machines, which control the 
flow through a short auxiliary culvert de- 
signed to maintain the water at the same ele- 
vation on both sides of the upper guard gates; 
the guard vahes and machines, controlling 
the intake of water into the side wall cul- 
verts at the upper end of the locks; the miter 
gate moving machines, to swing the leaves 
of the gates; the miter forcing machines, to 
draw the leaves tightly together when closed, 
and prevent leakage; the mechanisms 
which cause the handrails on top of the leaves 
to fold down when the leaves are swung back 
into their recesses in the walls; the pumps 
for unwatering sumps in the miter gate leaves, 
and in the pits of the fender chain machinery 
rooms; the machincr\' for actuating the fen- 
der chains, at all upper and lower guard gates, 
and at the intermediate and safety gates in 
Pedro Miguel Lock and upper chambers of 
Gatun and Miraflores Locks; the tracks and 
conductors for the towing locomotives; and 
the posts for the illumination of the locks. 

Ancillary to the foregoing is an elaborate 
system of electrical generation and transmis- 
sion to the transformer rooms in the lock 
walls, from which power is distributed to the 
various motors, and the interior and exterior 
lights. The operating motors number 334 
at Gatun Locks, 206 at Pedro Miguel, and 252 
at Miraflores; and at each set of locks their 
operation will be managed from a central 
control house. 

All of this work, as well as the installation 
of operating machinery in the spillways for 
Gatun and Miraflores Lakes, controlling 22 
Stoney gates, each 47 feet long by 19 feet 
high, has been carried on by the erection sub- 
division of th<" First Division of the Ofifice 
,of the Chief Engineer. The subdivision was 
organized on September 11, 1911, and began 
work immediately at Gatun. In Januarj', 
1912, a supervisor was transferred to Pedro 
Miguel Lock, and a force assembled to carry 
on the erection work there and, subsequently, 
at Miraflores Locks and Spillway. 

In connection with erection, this division 
has mixed and laid approximately 25,000 
cubic 5'ards of reinforced concrete at Gatun 
Locks, and will have placed about 50,000 
cubic yards in the Pacific locks. 
■^5 The condition of the principal machines 
necessary to the operation of the locks on 
September 1, 1913, is indicated in the follow- 
ing table: 



organization has carried its work forward 
as rapidly as the arrival of material or the 
advances of precurrent work have allowed. 
Today, as far as operating machinery is con- 
cerned, connections could be made in half 
a day which would allow the passage of a ves- 
sel through the sides of the locks for which the 
gates are ready, at Gatun and Pedro Miguel, 
the work is proportionately as well advanced 
at Miraflores. Preparations are being made 
for a test of valves controlling the flow of 
water into the west flight of Gatun Locks, as 
in conditions of operation. The force of the 
erection subdivision, on September 1, 1913, 
numbered 344 gold and 2,076 silver em- 
ployes. 



Pardons for Houston and Pilson. 

By direction of the Secretary of War, the 
Chairman of the Isthmian Canal Commission, 
on Friday, September 19, approved a pardon 
for J. Frank Houston, who was found guilty 
of murder in the second degree in the court 
of the Third Judicial Circuit at Cristobal on 
May 8, and sentenced to 10 years in the 
Canal Zone penitentiary. Houston shot 
and killed Harr\^ Stern, an employe in the 
commissary at Gatun. on February 8. A 
proclamation was issued through the De- 
partment of Civil Administration on Satur- 
day, September 20, placing October 11 as 
the eft'ective date of the pardon. 

F. K. Pilson, a former employe at the Cris- 
tobal post-oflSce, who was convicted of em- 
bezzlement in the court of the Third Judicial 
Circuit at Cristobal on October 12, 1912, and 
sentenced to 18 months' imprisonment in the 
Canal Zone penitentiary, was pardoned, ef- 
fective Saturday, September 20. on the 
ground of physical disability. 



Commercial Service at Naval Radio Stations. 

Beginning September 1, the radio stations 
of the United States Navy at Colon and 
Balboa are handling special classes of commer- 
cial radiograms, heretofore prohibited, as 
follows: 

1. Reply paid messages (where both message and 
answer can be prepaid by the sender.) 

2. Messages calling for repetition of messages (for 
verification only.) Charge for repeating back is one- 
fourth the charge for the original message. 

3. Radiograms to be delivered by mail. (If received 
from a ship, these will be mailed from the radio station. 
"Ocean letters" will be mailed by tlie ship at the first 
port of call, or at any port of call designated.) 

4. Multiple radiograms. These are messages ad- 
dressed either to several persons at same address, or to 
same person at several addresses served by the same 
radio station. These messages when received from sea 
will be separated and sent as so many individual mes- 
sages over the land wire. 

5. Radiograms calling for acknowledgment of re- 
ceipt. (Such acknowledgment is restricted to notifi- 
cation of date and hour at which the coast station de- 
livered the radiogram to ship addressed, and may be 



MACHINERY. 



Cylindrical valve machines 

Rising stem valve machines 

Miter gate moving machines 

Auxiliary culvert valve machines. 

.Spillway gate machines 

Guard valve machines 

Miler forcing machines 

Chain fender machines 

Handrail operating mechanism. . . 

Miter gate sump pumps 

Chain fender sump pumps 

Transforming stations 



Gatun. 
Per cent completion. 



No. 



60 
56 
40 

4 
14 

6 
20 
16 
36 
40 
16 
16 



Mechan- 
ical. 



Pedro Miguel. 
Per cent completed. 



tlec- 
tiical. 



100 
99 
93 

100 
71 

100 
39 
43 
70 
69 
3! 



42 
56 
28 
72 

5 
40 
46 

5 
54 
44 


67 



No. 



Mechan- 
ical. 



Elec- 
trical. 



Miraflores. 
Per cent completed . 



No. 



6 
12 
16 
20 
24 
16 



100 

100 

90 

100 



96 
33 
35 


67 





87 
71 
58 
62 



S 
30 


16 




55 



40 

36 

28 

4 

8 

6 

14 

16 

24 

28 

16 

12 



Mechan- 
ical. 



Elec- 
t.ical. 



100 

86 

83 

100 



33 

1 

30 



43 





38 

26 
4 

45 


7 

8 



38 



The table of percentages of completion in- 
dicates a large amount of work yet to be done, 
especially in the electrical part; but this 



sent by either mail or telegraph.) 

6. Paid service notices. (Sent in order to correct 
address or text, to cancel a message, etc.) 

Both stations, Colon and Balboa, are 



connected by direct wire with the Panama 
railroad telephone system and radiograms 
can be filed at any local ofliice. Attention is 
invited to the fact that no collect messages 
are handled, and no commercial messages 
are handled between stations which are con- 
nected by cable or telegraph, as, for instance, 
to Key West or Port Limon. 

The time of arrival of all Panama railroad 
boats is given to the telephone central at 
Colon as soon as received, and can be ob- 
tained there upon request without calling the 
radio station at Colon. 

— ^ 

Teachers' Meeting. 

The first meetings will be held on Tuesday, 
September 30, in the Ancon white school 
building. The white teachers will meet at 
8.30 in the morning, and the colored teachers 
at 2.40 in the afternoon. 

Fr.\nic p. Wagg, 

Superintendent of Schools. 

♦. 

Concrete Work in Loclfs and Spillways. 
Concrete work in the Canal locks is nearly 
completed, the aggregate amount in place 
at the close of work on September 20, being 
4,480,234 cubic yards. 

A statement of the concrete laid in the 
three sets of locks for the Canal, and in 
Gatun and Miraflores spillways, as o( Septem- 
ber 20, follows : 

Gatun Locks. 
The last concrete for the locks proper, as distinguished 
from chat necessary to finishing work by the First 
Divis:on. was mixed and placed on August 16. 1913. 
At the clos; of work on chat day the .otal amount of 
concrete placed by the Atlantic Division amounted to 
2,045,485 cubic yards. 

PEDRO MIGimL LOCK. 

Concrete laid. 
„ „ Cubic yards. 

Sept. 7 39 

Sept. 8. . 43 

Sept. 9 :::;; ^^ 

Sept. 10 Ij 

Sept. 11 ;; 31 

Sept. 12 14 

Sept. 13 ■ 54 

Sept. 15 ;:;:;:;:;;;: S3 

Sept. 16 13 

Sept. 17 :::;:;;;:;::::::: 63 

Sept. 18 •• 8 

Sept. 19 ;.';;:" lo 

Sept. 20 g 

Total 419 

Previously reported 923.756 

Grand total 924,175 

miraflores locks. 

li^Pt- ' SI 

Sept. 8 gi 

Sept. 9 gi 

Sept. 10 75 

Sept. 11 43 

Sept. 12 51 

Sept. 13 40 

Sept. 15 '.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.W 30 

Sept. 16 • 33 

Sept. 17 21 

Sept. 18 29 

Sept. 19 .■.'..■.■.■.■.■.'.'.■■ 18 

Sep^. 20 15 

Total •■ ■ 564 

Previously reported 1.510,184 

Grand total 1.510,748 

GATtnJ spillway.* 
Sept. 8 190 

Sept- ? 140 

Sept. 10 172 

Sept. 11 ; . ; ; ; 124 

Sept. 12 170 

Sept. 13 9g 

Sept. 15 '.'.'.'.'.'.'.'. 92 

Sept. 16 122 

Sep t . 1 7 .'.'.■.'.■.■.■.".■'.■ 86 

Sept. 18 g2 

Sept. 19 .'!!!.'!.';;.'.;!!' 87 

Sep>. 20 46 

J°taJ. . 1,404 

Previously reported 234.916 

Grand total 236.320 

MIR.\FL0RES SPILLWAY. 

The total of concrete at Mhaflores spillway — 75.610 
cubic yards — remained unchanged, no concrete having 
been laid during the fortnight ending September 20. 

♦Includes hydroelectric station. 



38 



THE CANAL RECORD 



Vol, VII, No. 5. 



COM MISSION CLUBHOUSES. 



Actlrltlei of the Young Men*6 Christian Ataocla- 
tlon. 

GENERAL. 

Moving picture schedule for the week September 29 
to October 4, is. as follows: Tuesday, Cristobal; 
Wednesday, Gatun; Thursday. Culebra; Friday. Em- 
pire and Porto Bello; Saturday, Corozal. 

COROZAL. 

The Corozal basketball team defeated the Marines 
of Camp Elliott on the formsr's flo^r on Tuesday night, 
September 15. Score. 21 to 19. Tha line-up of the 
teams, was, as follows: Corozal — McEachern. Bessy. 
Sperber, forwards; Carr, center; Schasffer, Kenny, 
guards. Camp Elliott— Schell, Smith, forwards; Mur- 
ray, center: Hc^rper, Hay, guards. 

The Gatun team will play at Corozal Saturday night. 

Mr. R. W. Karrchner took charge of the second 

chair in the barber shop on September 18, and from 6 

o'clock until 10 each week night two barbers will be in 

attendance. ' 

The standing in the local 3-men tenpin tournament 
on September 20, was, as follows: 
No. Team. IVoJi. Lost. 

4 7 2 

6 4 2 

7 3 3 

3 3 3 

5 6 6 

2 2 4 

8 2 4 

1 3 .... 6 

The following 200 or over, scores were bowled dur- 
ing the week: Sims. 204; Edwards, 200. 223, 216; 
Ziller. 220. 242. 214; Beall. 223; Sypolt. 201. 

The Culebra bowling team will bowl at Corozal next 
Saturday night. 

CULEBRA. 

High scores for the week in tenpins were, as follows: 
Herrington. 206; DcCora, 201. 

The Tenth Infantry Band will give a concert in 
front of the schoolhouse on Sunday night, September 
28, at 7 p. m. All are invited to attend. 

A new supply of pool cues has been received. 

EMPIRE. 

On Monday evening, September 15. the Empire chess 
club entertained the Culebra club. There were seven 
men on each team, and each man played two games 
with his opponent. Culebra won 7\ and lost 6J games. 
Emiiiie won 6^ and lost 7^ games. 

The standing of the local basketball league is, a 
follows: 

T-'am. Won. Lost. 

Reds 1 .... 

Whites 1 

Blues 1 

Greens .... 2 

Four games are scheduled for each week. The public 
is invited to attend these games. 

The Camp Elliott basketball team played the Empire 
team on Friday. September 19, and was defeated by a 
score of 36 to 21 

The Culebra bowling team bowled the Empire team 
on the Empire alleys on Saturday, September 20, Em- 
pire winning three sames Scores, Empire, 847, 863. 
908; Culebra. 764. 724. iiy7. 

The Empire Literary and Debating Society, after 
having a vacation for over a year, resumed its meetings 
on Fiiday evening. September 19. when plans were dis- 
cussed for the luture. The regular meeting night will be 
on Fridays unless other activities interfere, when an- 
other night will be advertised. An invitation to all is 
extended to attend this activity. 

The Y. M. C A. secured the Tenth Infantry Band 
to give an open air concert on Sunday. September 21 at 
3.30 p. m. The program, under the direction of 
Bandmaster Coe. was enjoyed. 

GATUN. 

The "Open house" held on Saturday evening. Sep 
tember 20. drew a large number of people. Punch 
and cake were served in the lobby, and David Roswell 
Homer played several piano selections during the 
evening. The feature of the evening was the basket- 
ball game between Camp EUiott and Gatun. Gatun 
won by a score of 27 to 22. The line-up was, as 
follows: 

Gatun, Camp Elliott. 

Whiston and Bruce R.F Scheei. 

Huber L.F Smith 

Wright C Murray 

Fit/patrick R.G.. . .McElroy and Harper 

Mitchell, Lee L.G Day and McDonald 

Fouls. Gatun 0. Camp Elliott 6. Referee. Hughes of 
Cristobal. Timer, Ben Jenkins. Scorer, Foman. At- 
tendance, 200. 

A number of the members met on Wednesday even- 
ing, September 17. and formed the Gatun Y. M. C. A. 
chess club. W. H. Brown was elected president of the 
club. Those interested are Messrs. Dashiell, Logan_ 
Carson, Farley. Byrne, Marguard, Brown, Sherrard] 



Morgan, Flege, Honer, and Kuehnle. A local tourna- 
ment is being arranged. Any member of the Y. M. C. 
A. may enter. 

The tenpin match between Camp Elliott and Gatun 
resulted in Gatun's taking two out of three games. 
The scores were, as follows: 



Gaiun. 

Jenkins 148 152 156 

Darnell 156 138 

Wells 146 202 151 

Messcle 154 193 99 

Thompson.. 221 148 

Heppner 174 159 



Marines. 

Grover 202 168 

Sherrard... . 145 198 200 

Tucker 154 174 197 

Wall 131 184 185 

McCauley.. 110 

Barte 169 165 

Dennis 88 



Totals.... 825 867 703 742 893 855 

Cristobal won ten and Gatun four games in the chess 
match. The players were; 



Cristobal. 

Taylor 2 

Ogden 

Tuttle 2 

\'erner 2 

Hurt 1 

Wechsler 2 

Wilson 1 



Gatun. 

Fiege 

Logan 2 

Marguard 

Carson 

Byrne 1 

Dashiell 

Brown 1 



Losl. 


P.C. 


.. 


. 1.000 


. 1 .. 


. . .750 


1 .. 


. . . 750 


. 3 .. 


. . .625 


. 2 .. 


. . .600 


3 .. 


.. .571 


. 1 . . 


. . .500 


4 .. 


. .500 


. 3 . . 


. . .400 


4 .. 


. .333 


. 6 .. 


. . .250 


. 3 . . 


. . .250 


. 3 .. 


. . .000 


4 ,. 


. .000 



Totals 10 4 

Members of other associations now living at Gatun 
are cordially invited to transfer their memberships to 
the local clubhouse. 

Michael Conley and Edward Walsh scored 161 and 
163. respectively, in duckpins during the week ending 
September 20. 

Dewey still leads the "Popular" handicap pool tour- 
nament, having won'tevery game so far. The standing 
follows : 

Name. Won. 

Dewey 8 . 

Townsley 3 . 

Pettit 3 . 

Von 5 . 

Kerruish 3 . 

Bailey 4 . 

Johnson 1 . 

Gray 4 . 

O'Hara 2 . 

Reisner 2 . 

Bradley 2 . 

Mitchell 1 . 

Dennis . 

Wall . 

"Louisiana" is the subject of a lecture to be given 
by J. Frank Harbert on Thursday, September 25. 
Colored slides will be shown. 

A stringed orchestra is being organized at the Y. M. 
C. A. All who play an instrument are cordially invited 
to join. 

CRISTOBAL. 

Messrs. King. Riley, and McMann furnished a num- 
ber of duets and solos for the moving picture entertain- 
ment Saturday night. September 20. The Saturday 
night moving pictures are meeting with marked favor, 
and the attendance averages 200 per night. 

The Corozal team defeated Cristobal at basketball 
on Saturday. September 20. by the score of 20 to 14. 
The playing of the Cristobal team, considering the little 
practice they have had was a surprise to the spectators. 

On Thursday, September 25, Mr. W. F. Bennyhoff 
will exhibit stereopticon slides of the Panama Canal 
under the auspices of the Discussion Club. 

The Discussion Club meeting on October 2 will be 
in charge of Mr. S. P. Verner. Subject, "Possibilities 
of increased trade relations with South American 
countries after the completion of the Panama Canal." 

The Gatun tenpin team will bowl at Cristobal on 
Saturday night. September 27. 

The team for the All- Isthmian tournament will be 
selected Thursday night of this week. 

PORTO BELLO. 

There was a large attendance at the clubhouse on 
Sunday night. September 2 1 , to see the moving pictures 
entitled "From the Manger to the Cross." 

The handicap pool tournament is nearly ended. The 
results to date are: 

Bucklin 12 

Bowen 1 1 

Smith 10 

Neil y 

Murray 6 

Cummings 7 

Colberg 7 

Keene • ■ • 6 

J. D. Sherrard 4 

Doyle 4 

Chase 4 

Thompson 1 

Englebrecht I 

T. W. Sherrard 1 

Mr. J. W. Sandrock, the Culebra barber, will come 



1 ... 


. .923 


2 ... 


. .846 


2 ... 


. .833 


3 ... 


. .750 


4 ... 


. .600 


S ... 


. .583 


6 ... 


. .538 


6 ... 


. .500 


8 ... 


. .333 


8 ... 


. .333 


9 ... 


. .307 


7 ... 


. .125 


11 . . 


. .083 


11 .. 


. .083 



over to Porto Bello every Monday and take charge of 
the barber shop. He made his first visit Monday, 
September 15. It is several months since there has been 
a barber here. 

Mr. J. J. Fitzpatrick. who Is acting quartermaster 
during the illness of Mr. Morgan, joined the Porto 
Bello association recently. As Mr. Fitzpatrick is one 
of the best basketball players on the Isthmus, interest 
in the game has been revived, and a team will be or- 
ganized to play occasional games. 

A "Smoker" is to be held on Saturday evening, Sep- 
tember 27 at the Llubhouse. 

The piano is being tuned and the piano player has 
been sent to the Cristobal shops for repairs. 

A reception was held in the clubhouse on Friday 
evening, September 19. after the moving picture show, 
under the auspices of the Union Sunday .school, to bid 
farewell to the scholars who are departing for the 
United States. Silver pins were presented to Mary 
Fisher, Elizabeth Fisher, and Melva Baker. Ice cream 
and cake were served. 

The big swimming float has been taken up to the 
d_ock and is being overhauled. New tar-coated barrels 
will be placed underneath. 



Rainfall, Sept. I to Sept. 20, 1913, Inclusive. 



Stations. 


3 TO 

.5 <u 
y. c 

T] o 






Pacific Section— 


Ins. 
1 88 
1.86 
1.25 
.91 
1.73 

1.93 
2.24 
1.23 
1.27 
2.15 
1.22 
1.38 
2.22 
3.26 

1.26 
1.49 
1.54 
3.13 


19 
8 

% 

19 

8 
9 
8 

'\ 
3 

19 
5 
5 

5 
IS 

8 
19 


Ins. 
5.95 


Balboa 


5.31 




5.34 




5.27 


Rio Grande 


7.29 


Central Stction — 

Culebra 


8.75 




5.99 




7.49 




5.88 


*JuanMina 


7.35 




6.30 


*El Vigia 


6.43 




8.37 


*Monte Lirio 


9.40 


Atlantic Section — 

Gatun 


S.67 




". 49 


Colon 


J. 83 


Porto Bello 


18.07 







♦Standard rain gage — readings at 5 p. m., daily. 
Automatic rain gage at unstarred stations — values 
midnight to midnight. tTo 5 p. m.. September 19. 



Stages of the Chagres. 

Maximum heights of the Chagres River for the week 
ending midnight. Saturday, September 20, 1913. 
heights are in feet above mean sealevel. 



AU 







Stations. 




Day and Date. 


Vigia. 


■3 

5 


1 

B 

S 


3^ 


Sun., September 14.... 
Mon.p September 15. . . . 
Tjes., September 16. . . 

Wed., September 17 

Thurs.. September 18. . 

Fn'., September 19 

Sat., September 20 


127.1 
128.0 
127.6 
127.6 
127.8 
129.8 
132.2 


93.4 
94.0 
93.9 
93.8 
93.9 
95.2 
96.8 


63.2 
63.4 
63.6 
63.7 
63.9 
64.1 
64.5 


63.2 
63.4 
63,5 

63.7 
63.9 

64.1 
64.4 


Height of low water to 


125.0 


91.0 


44.0 









*Sluice gates in spillway at Gatun were closed on 
June 27, 1913, with surface of lake at elevation 48,25. 

-♦ 

Notice of Shutting off of Water. 

Gatun. C. Z., September 23, 1913. 
To AU Conrernrd — The water will be shut off at a 
points south of IMiralfores station and north of Panama 
City from 7 a. m., to 3 p. m., Sunday, September 28. 
Tlie water will be shut off at all points south of Coro- 
zal from 9 a. m., to 3 p. m., Sunday. September 28, 
1913, with the exception of the Hotel Tivoli and Ancon 
Hospital, which will be supplied with water from the 
Ancon high service reservoir. 

Geo. M. Wells, 
Resident Engineer. 



Married. 

MILLETT-NORCROSS— On September 18, at the 
home of the bride's parents in Pedro Miguel, Miss 
Eunice Norcross to Mr. Ray E. Millett of Corozal, 
the Rev. Carl H. Elliott officiating. Canal Zone resi- 
dence, Corozal. 

P.\RMALEE-D.^NIELS— At Christ Church, Colon 
on September 23, Miss Helen La Verne Daniels of 
Canton, O.. to Edward Hosmer Parmalee of Indian- 
apolis, Ind., the Rev. Father Cooper officiating. 
Isthmian residence. Colon, 



September 24, 1913, 



THE CANAL RECORD 



39 



OFFICIAL CIRCULARS. 



Additional Information Relative to Transfer of 
Artisans to Classified Service in the 
United States. 
CuLEBRA. C. Z.. September 20. 1913. 
To All Concerned — -There appears to be some mis- 
understanding of the provisions of Circular No. 4S2. 
dated March 19. 1913, publishing the Executive Order 
which authorized the transfer to the classified ser\'ice 
In the United States, without examination, of artisans 
within three years from their discharge by the Commis- 
elon. The following information is furnished in ex- 
planation of and supplementary to the circular; it 
does not modify the circular in any way: 

1. Section f, paragraph 2, states that the employe 
must be specifically recommended for transfer to a 
cor res pond in (I position. Therefore, a machinist will be 
eligible to apply for a position as machinist only, a 
blacksmith will be eligible to apply for a position as 
blacksmith only, and so forth. An artisan in any one 
trade can not obtain a transfer to any other trade, or to 
a clerical or other position in the classified service. 

2. No list is made up from which offers of employ- 
ment are tendered to artisans separated from the serv- 
ice. To obtain a position in the States of the kind 
covered by Circular No. 4S3, an ex-employe recommend- 
ed for transfer must himself apply in person or by letter 
to the official in charge of the establishment or es- 
tablishments at which he desires employment, giving 
all the details necessary when applying for employ- 
ment, and stating that he has been recommended by the 
Isthmian Canal Commission for transfer to the position 
without examination, and he should request the official 
in charge to make request on the Washington office 
of the Isthmian Canal Commission for his transfer. 

3. Circular No. 482 does not constitute a promise of 
transfer without examination; to obtain a position, a 
vacancy must exist and the ex-employe must locate it 
and apply for it. 

Please post a copy of this letter in a conspicuous place 
In the shops. 

Respectfully, 

Geo. W. Goethals, 
Chairman and Chief Engineer. 



Preservation of Retired Equipment. 

Cui.ebra, C. Z., September 12. 1913. 
Circular No. 323-e; 

In connection with Paragraph 2, Circular 323-b, 
providing that the Mechanical Division will report to 
the Quartermaster's Department the approximate cost 
of repairs required to put retired equipment and ma- 
chinerj' in serviceable condition, the following addition- 
al instructions will become effective with the date of this 
circular: 

1. All equipment working south of Gatun should be 
sent to Empire shops and all equipment at Gatun and 
north of Gatun should be sent to Gatun engine house, 
after disposition has been given on same by the survey- 
ing officer as to its final disposition. On receipt of 
equipment at shops, an inspection will be made, defects 
noted, and proper action taken to preserve same, as 
noted below. Inspections should show general condition 
of stay bolts, fiues, boilers, machinery, and other detail 
that might be of interest to intending purchasers. There 
should also be furnished a rough estimate of the cost 
that would be necessary to put equipment in working 
condition. Result of such inspections and estimated 
cost of repairs to be sent to the Chief Quartermaster, 
and the chairman of the Board of Survey and Appraisal, 
(a) Locomotives — Boilers should be emptied and 
thoroughly cleaned of all scale and foreign matter. 
Boiler should then be filled with water, leaving 
space enough for at least two barrels of crude oil 
or a sufficient amount of crude oil to cover the in- 
ternal surfaces of boiler and tubes. This oil should 
be put in at dome, then blow-off cock should be 
opened up and boiler drained. The same instruc- 
tions apply to locomotive tanks as to boilers. 
The front end of locomotives and fire boxes of all 
boilers should be thoroughly cleaned and brushed 
off with wire brush and given a coat of tar paint. 
This paint ran be put on with a spray. The coal 
space on all locomotive tanks should be thoroughly 
cleaned and scaled and surface given a coat of tar 
paint. All exterior surfaces of equipment should be 
painted if necessary, using the standard grade of 
paint which is commonly used for that purpose. 
The jackets on all boilers should be given a coat of 
white lead and tallow. Smoke stacks should be 
covered with sheet-iron covering made specially 
for this purpose. Main rods of locomotives should 
be disconnected and all bearing and bright sur- 
faces receive a coat of white lead and tallow. 
Eccentric straps and blades should be removed 
" from locomotives and placed with main rods in the 
cabs, and cabs boarded up. The steam chest 
cover should be lifted. cylinderTieads removed, and 
all surfaces treated with a coating of white lead 
and tallow. It will be necessary to remove the 
valves and pull pistons in order to get at the parts, 
which should be replaced, steam chest and cylinders 
closed., and the crossheads blocked^in order to 



eliminate the moving of the pistons in cylinders. 
The air pumps and the feed pumps on all equip- 
ment should be opened up and surfaces treated 
with a coat of white lead and tallow. The cap on 
encineer's brake valve on locomotives should be 
lifted and the surfaces of the valves, etc.. slushed 
with vaseline. Alt exterior surfaces of cab fittings 
should be given either a coat of white lead and tal- 
low or vaseline. Interior surfaces of triple valves 
and injectors need not be treated, as they are brass. 
Journal box cellars on all drivers and engine, 
truck wheels should be well packed, also journal 
boxes ot^ tanks. 

(b) Steamshovels — The same general rules for 
the care of locomotives will apply to steamshovels. 
All engine pistons, valves, rods, eccentric straps, 
"A" frame collar and swing circle to be removed; 
shafts lifted from bearings, wearing surfaces 
cleaned, doned with white lead and replaced. 
Boilers should be stripped with Hgging, and cleaned 
as outlined for locomotive boilers. Water tanks 
should be taken off shovels, inspected, and if found 
in bad condition they should be scrapped and no 
tanks put on unless shovel is to be put in sen-nce, 
as there is a surplus of these tanks in Q. M. D. 
stock. Roofs should be painted with tar paint; 
also coal platforms and dippers. Other parts now 
covered with oil or grease can be protected with a 
coat of crude oil, which will be sufficient protection, 
fc) Unloiders, cranes, spreaders, hoisting en- 
gines, trackshiflers. and pHedrivers — Machinery 
should be gone over and given a coat of white lead 
and tallow, as outlined for steamshovels, 

(dl Miscellaneous machinery, including shop's 
machinery and tools — .'^ir pumps and feed pumps on 
all equipment should be opened up and surfaces 
treated with a coating of white lead and tallow. 
AH bearings, journal';, and bright surfaces of all 
machinery and equioment should be given acoat 
of white lead and tallow. 

2. The Quartermaster's Department will notify the 
Mechani-ral Division whenever any equipment or ma- 
chinery which has been turned over to thera shows 
any signs whatever of deterioration, so that same can 
be given proper attention. 

Geo. W. Goethals, 
Chairman and Chief Engineer. 



Disposition of Equipment No Lonjler Required. 

Culebra, C. Z.. September 12. 1913. 
Circular No. 323-f-. 

In order to facilitate the handling of equipment no 
longer needed and to be turned over to the Quarter- 
master's Department, the following disposition of same 
will be made, effective upon the abandonment of the 
high line dump between Gamboa and dump No. 7, 
which time is estimated by the Central Division as 
about September 15: 

(d) All rolling equioment will be assembled in 
each division at points to be designated by division 
engineers. The necessary survey parsers will be 
made up and the surveying officer nnti'ied of the 
location of any articles to be submitted for his 
action, 

(h) After apnroved action by the surveying 
officer, the equipment will be sent to storage, as 
follows: 

1. Steamshovels, to Tracks 1 to 7, inclusive. 
Gamboa yard. 

2. Plows and unloaders. to dump No. 6. 

3. Unserviceable Western dump cars, to 
dump No. 4. risht and left. 

4. ITriserviceable Oliver dump cars, to dump 
No. 5. right and left. 

5. Unserviceable Lidgerwoods to dumn No. 
No. 7. using the left, old left. ele\'ated, and 
rieht dumps. 

6. Serviceable cars of all classes will be stored 
nn yards, as follows: Dump No. 4. dump No. 
5. rio yard. 

(f) Ties as taken no in compliance with instruc- 
tions of August 22. 1913. from the Chairman and 
Chief Engineer, will be stored on dump right No. 
5. Fastenings to be sent to Mount Hope. 

(.d^ .A,ll switching will be done by the Central 
Division. 

(r) The storekeeper at Empire will be notified 
by the divisions concerned of each shipment to 
storage, as indicated abov-e. He will accomplish 
alt survey and other papers covering retired equip- 
ment, and maintain such check and records as may 
be required by the Chief Quartermaster. 

(/) Such shovels, plows, unloaders. and cars as 
have been or mav be retired from service prior to 
September 15. will be sent to storage as above in- 
dicated, by the Central Division. 

(g) Equipment retired and ordered to be turned 
over to the Quartermaster's Department for stor- 
age will be prepared for storage, after survey has 
been approved, in accordance with Circular No. 



323-E. 



Geo. W. Goethals, 
Chainnan ami Chief Engineer. 



August 23. 1911. relative to waste of coal resulting from 
unloading it directly on the ground, etc., which is being 
disrefearded. 

Your are directed to see that this order is carried 
out by providing suitable means to guard against loss, 
and have all fuel utilized as the work proceeds. 
Geo. W. Goethals. 
Chairman, Isthmian Canal Commission, 
President, Panama Railroad Company. 



Cleaning Coal froin Ends of Cars. 

Culebra, C. Z., September 12, 1913, 
Heads of Departments and Divisions: 

My attention has been invited to the fact that Cir- 
cular No. 405. of August 25. 1911. relative to cleaning 
coal from the ends of cars before returning to the 
Panama railroad, is being disregarded. 

You are directed to take immediate steps to have the 
practice discontinued, and see that this order is en- 
forced, Geo. W. Goethals, 

Chairman, Isthmian Canal Commission. 
President, Panama Railroad Company. 



Assistant to Chief Quartermaster. 

Culebra, C. Z.. September 20, 1913. 
Circular No. 500: 

Effective October I, 1913. Mr. Robert K. Morris 
will be appointed assistant to the Chief Quartermaster, 
Quartermaster's Department. 

Geo. W. Goethals. 
Chairman and Chief Engineer. 



Notaries Public at Gatun. 

An-con. C. Z.. September 13. 1913. 
To All Concerned— On September 10. I91.J, Mr. C. D. 
Thaxton, postmaster at Gatun, was appointed by me a 
notary public with jurisdiction throughout the Third 
Judicial Circuit of the Canal Zone, and took the oath 
of oftice on September 12 before Judge Thomas E. 
Brown. Jr., at Cristobal. Sergt. Lasvrence C. Callaway, 
of the Division of Police and Prisoub. who was appomt- 
ed a notary public on July 30, 191-j, has returned to his 
station at Gatun. This makes two not-'.rics public at 
Gatun now, available at almost any time, so that there 
should be no inconvenience caused any one at that 
point desiring to have papers acknowledged. 

Richard L. Metcalfe. 
Head of Department of Civil Administration. 



Actin* Superintendent, Southern District, Divi- 
sion of Municipal Fngineerin}^. 

Gatun. C. Z.. September 13, 1913. 
To All Concerned — Effective September 14. 1913, 
and during the absence on leave of Mr. D. E. Wright, 
superintendent of southern district, Division of Muni- 
cipal Engineering, Mr. E. H-. Chandler is designated 
acting superintendent oi southern district. 

Geo. M. Wells. 
Resident Engineer . in charge of 
Division of Municipal Engineering. 
Approved : 

Geo. W. Goethals. 

Chairman and Chief Entiiuecr. 



.\ppointment of Local Auditor, P. R. R. 

Panama R.\ilro.vd Company, 
Office of General Superintendent. 

Colon. R. P.. September 20. 1913. 
Circular No. 102: 

All Concerned — Effective at once. Mr. F. B. Clem- 
ents is appointed local auditor of the Panama Rail- 
road Company, with headquarters at Colon, Republic 
of Panama, vice Mr. R. W. Hart. 

J. D. Patterson, 
Approved: General Superintendent. 

Geo. W. Goethals, 

President. 



Modification of Rule 2, P. R. R. Time Table No. 15. 

Pan.\ma Railro.\d Company. 
Office of General Superintendent. 
Colon, R. P.. September 16. 1913. 
General Order No. U: 

That part of rule No. 2. timetable No. 15. designa- 
ting Gatun as a register station for all trains, is hereby 
moditied to the e.xtent that Gatun will be a register 
station for first and second-class trains only. 

John D. Patterson, 
General Superintendent . 



Waste of Coal Unloaded on Ground. 

Culebra. C. Z., September 12. 1913. 
He.\ds of Departments and Divisions: 
YoiiT attention is invited to Circular No. 402, of 



Sailing of tlie ''Cristobal, " 

Circular No. 207: 

To All Concerned — The sailing date of the steamship 
Cristobal has been set for Saturday. September 27. at 
3 p. m.. from Pier 11. Cristobal. 

John D. Patterson, 
Cetierai Superintendent. 



40 



THE CANAL RECORD 



Vol. VII, No. 5. 



COMMISSARY DEPARTMENT. 



Retail prices of cold storage provisions for the week 
beginning September 21. 19n: 

FRESH MEATS. 

Mutton — Stewing, per pound 

Shoulder, neck trimmed off (4 pounds 

and over) . per pound 

Entire, forequarter (not trimmed. 10 

pounds and over) , per pound ...... 

Leas (8 to 10 pounds), per pound. 



Price. 
6 



17 



Cutlets, per pound IS 

Short cut chops, per pound 20 

Lamb — Stewing, per pound 6 

Entire forequarter, neck trimmed off, 

per pound 9 

Legs (5 to 8 pounds), per pound 20 

Chops, per pound 24 

Cutlets, per poumi 24 

Veal — Stewing, per pound 10 

Shoulder, for roastins. not under 4) 

pounds), per pound 12J 

Chops, shoulder, per pound 17 

Chops, per pound 26 

Loins, for roasting 26 

Cutlets, per pound 30 

Beef — Suet, per pound 2 

Soup, per pound 5 

Stew, per pound 8 

Plate, per pound 9 

Corned, No. 1. per pound 14 

Corned, No. 2, per pound 12 

Chuck roast, 3 lbs., and over, per pound. 12 
Rib roarft. second cut (not under 3J 

pounds), per pound 16 

Rib roast, first cut (not under 3 pounds). 

per pound IS 

Pot roast, per pound 19 

Rump roast, per pound 19 

Porterhouse roast, per pound 20 

Steak. Chuck, per pound 12i 

Round, per pound 13 

Rib, per pound 18 

Sirloin, per pound 19 

Rump, per pound 19 

Porterhouse (not less than IJ 

pounds), per pound 20 

Tenderloin (Western), per pound. 30 

Pork — Loin chops or roast, per pound 17 

Hams, fresh, per pound ?20 

Shoulders, fresh, per pound ?17 

Spare ribs, per pound 15 

Backbones, per pound 15 

Pigs' feet, each 7 

Pigs* head, i-head 60 

Sausage, home made, per pound 20 

MISCELLANEOUS. 

Livers — Beef, per pound 11 

Calf, each 60 

Half, each 30 

Steak. Hamburger, package 13 

Sausage — Bologna, per pound 13 

Frankfurter, per pound 13 

Lieberwurst, per pound 13 

Devonshire Farm, per pound 20 

Sweetbread, beef, per pound 34 

Eggs, fresh, dozen 34 

one-half dozen only 17 

Bluefish, per pound 12 

Halibut, fresh, per pound 15 

Salmon, per pound 15 

Roe shad, each 75 

Shad roes, pair 40 

POULTRY AND GAME. 

Chickens — Fancy roasting, milk fed, large.each . . 1 .40 

Fancy roasting, mild fed, med.. each. . 1 . 10 
Fancy roasting, corn fed, about 5^ 

pounds, each 1.25 

Fancy rpasting. corn fed, about 4J 

pounds, each 1 . 00 

Fowls, each tt60, 70, 80, 90, and 1 .00 

Ducks, Western (about 4^ pounds), each 1 . 25 

Capon, each 2 . 00 

Broilers, milk fed, each 70 

Broilers, corn fed, each 60 

Turkeys, per pound 28 

Squabs, each 50 

Rabbits, skinned, each 30 

Partridges, pair 1.30 

Grouse, per pair 1 . 30 

Pheasants 1.30 

CURED AND PICKLED MEATS. 

Ham — Genuine Westphalia, per pound 40 

Ham — Sugar cured, per pound 20 

Sliced, per pound 22 

Half, for boiling, per pound 21 

Boiled, per pound 28 

Hocks, per pound t08 

Beef. .^lalt. family, per pound 12 

Bacon — Breakfast, whole piece, per pound 25 

Sliced, per pound 26 

Ham. lunch, per pound .52 

Pork, salt, family, per pound 14 

Ox tongues, each 1 . 00 

Pigs' feet, per pound 09 

Tongues, per pound 18 

DAIRY PRODUCTS. 

Butter — Creamery, special, per pound 34 

Sheliield Farms, extra fancy, per lb 46 

Cheese — Philadelphia cream, cake 10 

Roquefort, per pound ?■$ 

Vouns America, per pound 22 

Swiss, per pound 28 

Edam . each 1 . 00 

Edam, tin 25 

Parmesan, per pound 35 



Price. 

Cheeae — Gouda, per pound 30 

Snappy, per cake 10 

Milk (certified), per quart **.20 

Fer-mil-lac. bottle **.20 

Ice cream, quart 125 

J-gallon... tSO 

VEGETABLES AND FRUITS. 

Beets, per pound 3 

Celery, per head 6 

Cabbage, per pound *3 J 

Cucumbers, per pound 4 

Carrots, per poimd 4 

Egg plant, per pound 4 

Lettuce, per pound 14 

Onions, per pound 3 

Potatoes, white, per pound 3 

sweet, per pound 2 

Parsley, bunch 5 

Peppers, green, per pound 4 

Romaine, per pound 14 

pQuash, per pound . . 3 

Turnips, per pound 4 

Tomatoes, per pound 5 

Yarns, ppi pound 3 

Canteloupes, each 7 

Grapes. Malaga, per pound 14 

Grape fruit, each 4 

American, each 15 

Lemons, dozen 24 

l.imes, per hundred 80 

Peaches, per pound *5 

Plums *10 

Pears, per pound 8 

Oranges. Jamaican, per dozen 18 

Watermelons, each t40 

♦Indicates reduction from last list. 

♦♦Indicates 5 cents allowed for return of tottle. 

tindicates advance on last list. 

ttFowls weigh each, about as follows: ?. 3^, 4, 4^, 
and 5 pounds. Prices are based accordingly; when 
size ordered is not hi stock, next lightest weight is 
supplied and refund note sent for difference. 

JSold only from commissaries; no order taken for 
delivery. 

^Not less than half of a fresh ham or shoulder wjll be 
sold. 

♦ 

Supplies for the Canal. 

The following steamers with supplies for the Isth- 
mian Canal Commission and Panama Railroad Com- 
pany, arrived at the ports of Balboa, Colon, and Cristo- 
bal, during the week ending September 13: 

Carrillo. September 7, from New York, with 300 cases 
linseed oil, eight bales life preservers, for stock; 246 
cases electrical material, for First Division; 20 cases 
electrical material, 399 bundles structural material, for 
Mechanical Division. 

Colon. September 8, from New York, with four cases 
electrical material, for Panama Railroad Company; 
nine boxes car seals, for stock; 41 packa&es medical sup- 
plies, three cases surgical instruments, 14 bundles bas- 
kets, for Sanitary Department; 64 boxes paper nap- 
kins, for stock; sL\ boxes blue print paper, for various 
departments; two boxes cancelling machines, for 
Canal Zone Government; four cases photographic 
material, for Chirf Engineer; II crates tile machines, 
for Mechanical Division; three cases electrical material, 
for Sixth Division; three cases drawing material, for 
stock; 296 pieces pipe, for First Division; 38 boxes 
ink. 15 cases varnish, for stock; 16 truck wheels, for 
Mechanical Division; 31 cases castings, for First 
Division; 30 bundles shovels, SO bales oakum, for 
stock; 160 pieces car castings, for Mechanical Division; 
664 pieces pipe, for stock; 317 kegs and 10 boxes bolts 
and rivets, for coaling plant. Cristobal; 500 tower 
knuckles, 15 boxes incandescent lamps, for Mechani- 
cal Division; 17 boxes incandescent lamps, for Light- 
house division; 242 pieces pipe, for First Division; 
66 kegs iron washers, for stock; 43 casks tile, for First 
Divison; 312 pieces pipe, for stock; 75 pieces castings, 
for Mechanical Division; 158 pieces pipe, for Second 
Division; and a miscellaneous cargo, the whole con- 
sisting of 3.524 packages, weighing 551 tons. 

Heredia. September 8. from New Orleans, with 1.325 
pieces lumber, for Mechanical Division; 212 pieces 
lumber. 435 bales straw, 200 pieces pipe, 260 barrels 
fire clay, for stock; 1,679 sacks creosoted blocks, for 
Second Division; 1,321 barrels paving brick, for 
Panama Railroad Company. 

Prinz Joadiiin, September 8, from New York, with 
54,228 pounds bolts and screws, for stock; 76 packages 
furnace material. 248 barrels building brick, for Me- 
chanical Division. 

Lyra. September 9, from San Francisco, with two 
spud timbers. 30 bales dredging sleeves. 47 packages 
oil burning equipment, for Sixth Division; 2.100 cases 
dynamite, for stock. 

Santa Maria. September 10. from New York, with 
3i pieces chain. 39 bundles sheet steel, SO carboys 
muriatic acid, for stock; 327 pieces structural ma- 
terial, for First Division. 

Atenas. September U. from New Orleans, with 829 
bales straw. 351 bales hay. 500 kegs white lead, for 
stock; 2,693 sacks creosoted blocks, for Si-cond Divi- 
sion; 1,885 pieces lumber, for stock. 

Joseph J. Cuneo, September 11, from Baltimore, with 
10,000 cases dynamite, for stock. 



MOVEMENT OF OCEAN VESSELS- 



The following is a list of sailings of the Panama 
Railroad Steamship Company; of the Royal Mail 
Steam Packet Company; of the Hamburg-American 
Line, and of the United Fruit Company's Line: 

NEW YORK TO CRISTOBAL.* 

Allianca P. R. R.. Monday Sept. 22 

Colon P. R. R.. Saturday Sept. 27 

Advance P. R. R. .Saturday Oct. 4 

Panama P. R. R. . Friday Oct. 10 

Allianca P. R. R. . Thursday. . . . Oct, 16 

Colon P. R. R.. Wednesday. .Oct. 22 

Advance P. R. R.. Tuesday Oct. 28 

Panama P. R. R. .Monday Nov, 3 

Allianca P. R. R. .Monday Nov. 10 

Colon P. R. R.. Monday Nov. 17 

Advance P. R. R. . Saturday Nov, 22 

Panama •. .P. R. R.. Saturday Nov. 29 

Allianca P. R. R. . Friday Dec. 5 

CRISTOBAL TO NEW YORK.* 

Cristobal P. R. R. . Saturday Sept. 27 

Panama P. R. R. . Monday Sept. 29 

Allianca P. R. R.. Saturday Oct. 4 

Colon P. R. R.. Thursday Oct. 9 

Advance P. R. R.. Thursday Oct. 16 

Panama P. R. R. .Wednesday. .Oct. 22 

Allianca P. R. R. .Tuesday Oct. 28 

Colon P. R. R.. Tuesday Nov. 4 

Advance P. R. R. Sunday Nov. 9 

Panama P. R. R. .Sunday Nov. 16 

Allianca P. R. R.. Saturday Nov. 22 

Colon P. R. R.. Saturday Nov. 29 

Advance P. R. R. . Friday Dec. 5 

NEW YORK TO COLON. 

Zacapa U. F. C. Wednesday . .Sept. 17 

Emil L. Boas H.-A Saturday Sept. 20 

Tenadores U. F. C. Saturday Sept. 20 

Almirante U. F. C Wednesday . .Sept. 24 

Prinz Joachim H.-A Saturday. . . .Sept. 27 

Carrillo U- F. C Saturday Sept, 27 

Magdalena R. M . . .Saturday. . . .Sept. 27 

Santa Marta U. F. C. . Wednesday . . Oct. 1 

CarlSchurz H.-A. .. .Saturday Oct. 4 

Pastores U. F. C. . Saturday Oct. 4 

Mctapan U. F. C. Wednesday . .Oct. 8 

Prinz August WUhelm.H.-A. . . .Saturday Oct. 1 1 

Tivives U. F. C. Saturday Oct, 11 

Danube R, M . . . Saturday .... Oct. 1 1 

Zacapa U. F. C. .Wednesday . .Oct. 15 

COLON TO NEW YORK. 

Metapan U. F. C. . Thursday. . . . Sept. 25 

Danube R. M. . .Tuesday Sept. . 30 

Tivives U. F. C. . Tuesday Sept. 30 

Prinz August Wilhelm. H.-A Tuesday Sept. 30 

Emil L. Boas H.-A Tuesday Oct. 7 

Tenadores U. F. C. Tuesday Oct. 7 

Almirante U. F. C. Thursday Oct. 9 

Prinz Joachim H.-A Tuesday Oct. 14 

Carrillo U. F. C. Tuesday Oct. 14 

Tagus R. M. . .Tuesday Oct. 14 

Santa Marta U. F. C. .Thursday. . . .Oct. 16 

Pastores U. F. C, . Tuesday Oct. 21 

Carl Schurz H.-A. .. .Tuesday Oct. 21 

NEW ORLEANS TO COLON. 

Abangarez U. F. C. Saturday Sept. 20 

Parismina U. F. C. .Wednesday. .Sept, 24 

Atenas U. F. C. Saturday Sept. 27 

Sixaola U. F, C. Wednesday. .Oct. 1 

Turrialba U. F. C. Saturday Oct. 4 

COLON TO NEW ORLEANS. 

Turrialba U. F. C. Thursday Sept. 25 

Cartago U. F. C. Saturday Sept. 27 

Abangarez U. F. C. . Thursday Oct. 2 

Parismina U. F. C. . Saturday .... Oct. 4 

♦Amended schedule, resulting from temporary with- 
drawal of the AUiama for repairs. 



Tide Table. 

The following table shows the time of high and low 
tidts Jt Panama for the week ending October 4, 1913: 



Date. 


Low 


High 


Low 


High 


Low 




A.M. 


A.M. 
!.« 
2.31 
3.18 

4 00 
4.43 

5 25 

6 08 


A.M. 
7.55 
s 45 
9.32 
10.17 
11-00 
11. J5 
P. M. 
12 30 


P.M. 
2.04 
2 55 
3.40 

4 25 

5 08 
5.52 

6.37 


P.M. 

8.18 


Sept 29 




9.07 


Sept 30 




9.52 


Oct 1 . 




10.36 


Oct. 2 




11.20 


Oct 3. 






Oct. 4.... 


12.05 





7 5th meridian time 



Lost — Camera and case. Sunday night, September 
14. on train from Colon. The camera ie without a bulb, 
and containa a roll of exposed films. The finder will 
please communicate with Mr. W. W. Darling, Box 
255, Empire. 



CANAL 




RECORD 



Volume VII. 



ANCON, CANAL ZONE, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 1, 1913. 



No. 6. 



The Canal Record 

Published weekly under the authority and supentsion of 
the Isthmian Ca?ial Comtnission. 



The Canal Record is published free of charge, one copy 
each to all employes of the Commission and Panatna 
Railroad Company whose natnes are on the gold roll. 
Extra copies and back numbers can be obtained from the 
news stands of the Panama Railroad Company for five 
cents each. 



Address all Comniuaications, 

THE CANAL RECORD, 

Ancon, Canal Zone, 

Isthmus of Panama. 

No communication either for publication or requesting 
information, will receive aUentioti unless signed with the 
full name and address of the writer. 

NOTES OF PROGRESS. 



Water Admitted Into Culebra Cut. 

Water was admitted into Culebra Cut 
through the four 24-inch pipes extending into 
the lake underneath Gamboa dike, at 9 
a. m., on Wednesday, October 1. It is cal- 
culated that the velocity of the flow is about 
24.1 feet per second, and that the discharge 
amounts to about 354 cubic feet per second, 
which will fill the Canal as far as Cucaracha 
slide at the rate of 1.6 feet a day. At this 
rate by the morning of October 10, when it is 
planned to destroy the dike, the depth of 
water in this section of the Cut will not be 
far from 15 feet. The slide at Cucaracha has 
completely closed the Cut, in one place to the 
73-foot level, therefore, the water discharged 
into the Canal by means of the pipes between 
October 1 and 10 will be wholly confined to 
the section between the slide and the dike. 
To overtop the slide, it will be necessary for 
the water in the lake to reach a level of 73 
feet above mean scalevel. The lake will prob- 
ably reach not to exceed 68 feet by October 
10. A ditch will be cut through Cucaracha slide 
to start the water through and, it is expect- 
ed that a great deal of the slide material 
will be washed into the drainage ditch be- 
tween the slide and Pedro Miguel Locks. 

The drainage pumps in the Cut near the 
dike was shut down on Wednesday, Septem- 
ber 24; all the machinery was removed and 
the building which housed it was razed. 
Sufficient water had collected in the Cut 
on October 1, from seepage and surface drain- 
age to cover the bottom between Cucaracha 
slide and the dike. 



Spillway Ready for Further Rise of Gatun Lake. 

The mechanical installation of the opera- 
ting machinery for the regulating gates at the 
spillway of Gatun Dam was completed on 
September 25. The 14 gates are now in place, 
surmounting the crest of the ogee, at 69 teet 
above sealevel, and ready to maintain the 
rise of the lake above that elevation. Tempo- 



rary' electrical connections were made, in order 
to test and operate the machinery, and the 
installation of the permanent cables and con- 
trol equipment is now under way. The oper- 
ating machinery and the gate itself, were 
made to do sers-ice in grinding true the fixed 
irons set in the supporting piers between which 
the gates will operate; a cutting tool at- 
tached to the side of the gate made of it a 
sort of vertical shaper when the gate was 
lowered. Afterward, the irons were smoothed 
by hand to a maximum variation of .005 
inch. The horizontal seats on the crest of 
the ogee were babbitted a.^ter the lower edge 
of the gate had been milled to a true hori- 
zontal surface. 



FIRST LOCK OPERATION. 



Process in Cable Installation at Gatun Locks. 

On September 13, the cable pulling gang 
of the First Division at Gatun pulled 12,121 
feet of control cable and 2,200 feet of No. 0000 
3-conductor power cable into the shafts and 
tunnel running under the lock floors in the 
vicinity of the control house. 

The control cable was drawn down a 
shaft in the west wall, through the tunnel 
and up a shaft to the operating tunnel in the 
center wall. The power cable was drawn 
down a shaft in the west wall, through the 
tunnel under the center wall and both lock 
chambers to the east wall, and up through 
the shaft. The tunnel under the locks at 
this point is approximately 125 feet below 
the coping level, so that each cable had to be 
supported at the upper ends of the vertical 
shafts to prevent its slipping down into the 
duct. When the installation is completed, 
the cable will be supported in the ducts by 
a combined action of friction between the 
cable and duct, and by a curved duct at the 
bottom taking the thrust. Each of the control 
cables was 380 feet long, and each of the power 
cables was 550 feet in length. 



Formal Opening of Tramways. 

The street railway system of Panama, in 
service since August 1, was formally in- 
augurated on Saturday, September 27, when 
the Municipal Council of the city and a num- 
ber of officials and prominent business men 
were the guests of the Panama Tramways 
Company, and R. W. Hebard and Company, 
Inc., the constructor of the ;5ystem, in a special 
trip to the end of the line at Las Sabanas 
police staiion, and a luncheon at the bathing 
pavilion on the beach of the Bella Vista 
Estate. Two special cars, decorated in the 
national colors of the United States and 
Panama, carried the party. At the luncheon, 
short addresses, bearing on the development 
of Panama, were made by Canal Commissioner 
R. L. Metcalfe, Don Ramon F. Acevedo, 
secretary of public works of Panama, Mr. 
W. L. Black, superintendent of the tramways 
company, Mr. R. W. Hebard, and others. 



Tug Successfully Passed Through the West Flight 
at Gatun Locks on September 26. 

Gatun Locks were operated for the first 
time on Friday. September 26, when the sea- 
going tug Gatun. now in the service of the 
Sixth Division, was passed through the west 
flight from the Atlantic channel to Gatun 
Lake. This date was chosen, because of the 
approaching departure from the Isthmus of 
Maj. James P. Jer\'ey, who had charge of 
the masonry construction of the locks, and 
of Maj. George M. Hoffman, who had charge 
of the building of Gatun Dam. under Lieut.- 
Col. Sibert. The operation was entirely suc- 
cessful and was witnessed by a large number 
of people. 

The first step in the filling of the locks 
was to fill the space between the upper guard 
and upper operating gates. This was done 
through the 60-inch auxiliary culvert valve 
in the west wall. This operation was started 
at 9.07 a. m., on Thursday, September 25, 
and continued to about 3.30 p. m., it being 
necessary to close the valve twice during this 
period to clear vegetation away from the 
trash screen at the intake. 

The second step was also on Thursday, 
and consisted in the filling of the culvett in 
the center wall as a test of the valves and 
bulkhead.5, as well as the culvert itself. The 
upper section only was filled, and after 
shutting off the rising stem valve at the upper 
end, this water was used to test successively 
the center culverts of three levels, being finally 
deposited into the lower lock by opening the 
cylindrical valves in that level. 

To remove the bulkheads from the upper 
end of the west culvert, it was ncccssarj' to 
equalize to some extent the pressure of the 
lake by pressure on the lower side of the bulk- 
head. It was originally intended to do this by 
accumulating the leakage through the bulk- 
heads in the culvert, between the upper rising 
stem valves and the bulkheads. The leakage 
of the bulkheads was, however, so slight that 
it was decided to introduce water into the 
upper end of the upper lock which communi- 
cates with the rear side of the bulkheads 
through the west culvert. This was done, and. 
the bulkhead removed at 10 a. m.,on Fri- 
day, September 26. At 1 1.20 a. m., water was 
admitted to the upper end of the upper lock 
from the west culvert through the upper rising 
stem valves and the water brought up to lake 
level. The upper rising stem vaK'es were then 
closed and this water was passed down the 
flight of three locks as a preliminary test of 
the valves and culverts of the west wall. 
Water was then locked down, step by step, 
from the lake to the lower lock, which was also 
being filled by the two- 14-inch sea valves in 
the lower guard gates. 

The filling of the lower lock was completed 
about 4.45 p.m., when the sea gate was opened, 



42 



THE CANAL RECORD 



' Vol. VII, No. 6. 



and the Gatun, with flags flying and whistle 
blowing steamed into the lower lock, ac- 
companied by the cheers of the assembled 
spectators. The lower operating gates were 
closed, and the tug came to a stop alongside 
the center wall to which it was moored. The 
process was repeated in the middle lock, and 
at 6.15 o'clock, just as dusk was falling, the 
vessel entered the upper lock'for the last lift. 
This was accomplished at 6.45 o'clock, when 
the two last gates were swung, and the tug 
passed out into Gatun Lake, the entire pas- 
sage occupying approximately one hour and 
51 minutes. In order to save time on the 
ascent, the short length of lock was used. 
The filling of the lock chambers occupied a 
longer time than normally, because of the 
small displacement of the tug; in the case of 
a large vessel, much less water would have 
been used. The total lift was approximately 
64.70 feet, divided between the three locks, 
about as follows: Lower lock, 11.2 feet; mid- 
dle lock, 23.7 feet; upper lock, 29.8 feet. 

During this operation of the locks, all of the 
operating devices were operated from local 
control, that is, each machine was operated 
from the panel in the same room with the 
machine. This made it necessary for the 
operator to move from machine to machine 
for the various operations, whereas, when the 
plant is completed, the entire flight will be 
controlled from the central control tower, 
from which point the machines will be oper- 
ated and an indication received as each oper- 
ation occurs. 

The openingand closing of the gates, and the 
operation of the culvert valve and lock opera- 
ting machinery during the tests, and the lock- 
age of the vessel, were under the immediate 
super\'ision of Col. H. F. Hodges, the designer 
of the locks, their equipment and operating 
machinery, and the regulating works of the 
Canal. In this he was aided by Mr. Edward 
Schildhauer, the electrical and mechanical 
engineer of the Commission, and the inventor 
of the bull wheel which opens and closes the 
lock gates, and Mr. E. E. Lee, superintend- 
ent of erection; Mr. F. C. Clark, assistant 
superintendent of erection; Mr. C. P. Fortney, 
superintendent of mechanical installation; 
Mr. S. H. Grauten, testing engineer, and 
Mr. Geo. F. Guynn, inspector of lock gates 
and protective devices. 

The Calun, formerly the H. B. Chamber- 
lain, is a steel seagoing tugboat, with a length 
of 101 feet, beam 22 feet, and a load line draft 
of 12^ feet. It was built by the firm of 
Ncafie and Levy of Philadelphia in 1902. and 
was purchased by the Canal Commission for 
the use of the Atlantic Division in 1906, 
arriving at Colon on June 25 of that year. 
It is commanded by Capt. F. F. Stewart, and 
its navigation through the locks was in per- 
sonal charge of Mr. W. G. Comber. The 
vessel had among its passengers on this initial 
trip, Col. H. F. Hodges, Lieut. -Col. William 
L. Sibertand family, Maj. James P. Jervey,and 
Mrs. Jer\ey, Maj. George M. Hoffman, Lieut. 
Geo. R. Goethals, and Mrs. Goethals, Mr. 
Henry Goldmark, Captain Corning of the 
steamer Panama, Mrs. Edward Schildhauer, 
and Mrs. E. E. Lee. 

On Saturday forenoon, September 27, the 
tug was returned to the Atlantic channel, 
the record of its progress being, as follows: 

8.27 — Opened rising stem valves Nos. 254and255 to 
equalize A-ater in both ends of upper lock. 

8.34 — Water equalised at 29 feet over sill. 

8.35 — Opened rising stem valve No. 260 to lake. 



8.46 — Opened intermediate gates Nos. 31 and 32. 

8.47 — Second lising stem valve No. 261 to lake opened 
four feet. 

8.50 — Opened upper guard gates Nos. 39 and 40. 

8.55 — Water equaiued in upper end of lake at 28.4 
feet over upper sill. 

FIRST LOCK.\GE. 

8.58 — Opened upper operating gates Nos. 35 and 
36 for entry of tug. 

9.00 — Closed rising stem valves Nos. 260 and 261 
to lake. 

9.00 — Closed upper operating gates Nos 35 and 36. 

9.05 — Closed upper guard gates Nos. 39 and 40. 
Opened rising stem valves Nos. 248 and 249 to middle 
lock. Opened gates Nos. 19 and 20. and 27 and 28, 
lower safety gates of upper lock. 

9.26 — Water equalized in middle and upper locks at 
39.8 feet over sill. 

9.26 — Opened gates Nos. 23 and 24, operating. 
Tug passed to middle lock. 

SECOND LOCKAGE. 

9.27 — Closed gates Nos. 27 and 28, safety gates, be- 
hind tug. 

9.30 — Closed gates Nos. 23 and 24. operating gates, 
behind tug. Closed rising stem valves Nos. 248 and 
249, between upper and middle lock. 

9.30— Water in middle lock 59 feet over sill. Water 
in lower lock about elevation plus 0.5 feet. 

9.45— Opened rising stem valves Nos. 232 and 233. 
middle to lower lock. 

10.04 — Opened gates Nos. 15 and 16. between middle 
and lower lock. 

10.05 — Tug passed to lower lock. 

10.06 — Clo.sed gates Nos. 15 and 16. 

THIRD LfiCK.\GE. 

10.00 — Opened rising stem valve No. 216. between 
middle and lower lock; water in lower at 66 feet; 
water on sea gage at elevation 1 plus 0.5 feet. 

10.28 (est.) — Water equalized at sealevel at eleva- 
tion pUis 0.5 feet. 

10.30— Opened gates Nos. 7 and 8, lower operating 
gates. 

10.33— The Galun passed out to sealevel. Closed 
Nos. 7 and 8; and 3 and 4, lower operating and lower 
guard gates. Lockage completed. Time 1 hour 37 
minutes. 

On lockage down, the entire 1,000-foot lock was used 
as for the passage of a ship of maximum capacity. 



Work on Panama's Exposition Begun. 

The corner stone of the administration 
building to be erected on the site of the nation- 
al exposition, which Panama proposes to 
hold in 1914-15 in commemoration of the 
four hundredth anniversary of the discovery 
of the Pacific Ocean by Vasco Nufiez de 
Balboa, was laid on Thursday, September 
25, by President Porras. .The sites allotted 
for the different buildings were blessed by the 
Bishop of Panama, Dr. William Rojas, and 
the plans were exhibited by Mr. Alejandro 
Bermudez, the director of the exposition. 
Following the laying of the corner stone. Dr. 
Ramon F. Acevedo, secretary of public works, 
made an address. The day was made a public 
holiday in Panama, partly on account of the 
corner stone ceremonies, and partly, because 
September 25, under the old calendar, was 
the date in 1513 when Balboa first saw the 
Pacific. It is planned to open the exposition 
on November 1, 1914, to continue six months, 
and for carrying out the project the Panama 
National Assembly has voted a preliminary 
credit of S150,000. The United States, 
Spain, and several of the neighboring Latin- 
American republics have been invited to 
participate. The grounds front the road to 
Las Sabanas, about opposite the orphan 

asylum, and cover an area of about 35 acres. 

* 

Civil Service Examinations. 

E.\amination will be held probably on 
October 26 for the positions of stenographer 
and typewriter. Isthmian Canal Sen'ice; 
stenographer and typewriter, Philippine Serv- 
ice; and typewriter, Isthmian Canal Serv- 
ice. Applications will not be received after 
October 8; this date may be changed if 
necessary. Persons interested should re- 



quest a copy of Form 1424, which contains 
information in regard to the abovenamed ex- 
aminations. 

Competitors in the abovenamed ex- 
aminations must bring their own typewriting 
machines to the examination room. 

The examinations will be held probably in 
the Commission clubhouse at Empire, but 
the place and date should be omitted in ap- 
plications. 

A card of admission will be sent to those 
found eligible to be admitted, just before the 
examination. 

In answer to questions as to residence, ap- 
plicants must show residence in a State or 
Territory of the United States, and county 
thereof, up to the time of filing application. 
IsTHMi.\N Civil Service Bo.\rd. 

Culebra, C. Z., September 29, 1913. 

♦ 

Concrete Work in Locks and Spiliways. 

Concrete work in the Canal locks is nearly 
completed, the aggregate amount in place 
at the close of work on September 27, being 
4,480,983 cubic yards. 

A statement of the concrete laid in Pedro 
Miguel and Miraflores Locks, and in Gatun 
and Miraflores spillways, as of September 
27, follows: 

Gatun Locks. 

Th': last concrete for the locks proper, as distinguished 
from that necessary to finishing work by the First 
Divis-on. was mixed and placed on August 16. 1913. 
At the close of work on that day the total amount of 
concrete placed by the Atlantic Division amounted to 
2,045,485 cubic yards. 

PEDRO MIGUEL LOCK. 

Concrete laid. 
Cubic yards. 

Sept. 22 

Sept. 23 

Sept. 24 

Sept. 25 

Sept. 26 8 

Sept. 27 

Total 8 

Previously reported 924.175 

Grand total 924,183 



.MIRAFLORES LOCKS. 



Sept. 22. 
Sepu 23. 
Sept. 24. 
Sept. 25. 
Sept. 26. 
Sept. 27. 



19 
16 

34 

7 

116 

47 



Total 239 

Previously reported 1,510,748 



Grand total 1,510.987 

GATUN SPILLWAY.* 

Sept. 22 36 

Sept. 23 70 

Sept. 24 70 

Sept. 25 98 

Sept. 26 92 

Sept. 27 136 



Total 502 

Previou.;ly reported ' 236,320 



236,822 



Grand total 

MIRAFLORES SPILLW.W. 

The total of concrete at Miraflores spillway — 75,610 
cubic yards — remained unchanged, no concrete having 
been laid during the week ending September 27. 

*Incljcles hydroelectric station. 



Time Table Changes. 

On account of new timetable No. 16 taking 
effect Monday, October 6, at 12.01 a. m., 
train No. 72, scheduled to leave Panama 
for Bas Obispo at 12.20 a. m., Monday, on 
timetable No. 15, will not run. The last train 
leaving Panama Sunday night, October 5, 
for Bas Obispo, is train No. 58, leaving at 
10 p. m. The first train leaving Panama for 
Bas Obispo, Monday, October 6, will be at 
6 a. m. Owing to the demand on the part 
of the public for an opportunity to inspect 
the locks, the Gatun shuttle train ser\'ice 
has been e.\tended to include Sundays. Par- 
lor cars will be run on trains numbered 2, 3, 
4, 5, 6, aad 7, daily. 



October 1, 1913. 



THE CANAL RECORD 



43 



PANAMA RAILROAD COMPANY. 



PASSENGER TRAIN TIME TABLE No. 16-IN EFFECT OCTOBER 6.1913. 

PANAMA-COLON MAIN LINK SERVICE. 



SOUTHWARD. 


Station. 


NORTHWARD. 


FIRST CLASS. 


FIRST CLASS. 


Satur- 
day 
only. 




Sun- 
day 
only. 


Daily 

except 

Sun. 


DaUy. 


Dis- 
tance 

from 
Colon. 


Daily. 




71 




11 


9 


7 


5 


3 


2 4 


6 


8 


P.M. 
11.20 
11.25 




P.M. 
9.30 
9 35 


P.M. 

8.25 
8.. 10 


P.M. 
5.00 
5.05 
5.15 
5.28 

5.40 

5.49 

5.57 
6 08 
6.20 
6.26 
6 34 
6.45 
P.M. 


A.M. 
11.05 
11.10 
11.20 
11.33 

11.44 

1! S3 
P.M. 

12.03 
12.14 
12. .30 
12.36 
12.44 
12.,'iS 
P.M. 


A.M. 

7.30 
7 35 
7.45 
7.58 

8.10 

8.19 

8.27 
8.. 18 
8.50 
8.56 
9.04 
9.15 
A.M. 


Lt. tColon Arr. 




1.57 

6.79 

14.48 

20.92 

26.13 

30.26 
35.19 
40.23 
41.74 
1 44.24 
1 47.08 


A.M. P.M. 
9.15 ; 12.45 
9.11 1 12.41 
9.01 ' 12.30 
8.48 12.15 


P.M. 
6.45 
6.41 
6.30 
6.18 

6.06 

S.S7 

5.49 
5.36 
3.25 


P.M. 
9.15 
9.10 


11 35 


9.45 8.4C 


tOat un 


8.58 


11.48 


9.58 
10.10 
10.19 
10.27 


8.55 
9.08 
9.17 
9 26 




8.43 


A.M. 
12 00 




8.36 

8.27 

8.19 
8 06 
7.55 
7.48 
7.40 
7.30 
A.M. 


12.03 
P.M. 
11.54 

11.44 
11.30 
11.17 


8.31 


12 09 




8.22 


12 17 




8.14 


12 28 


10.38 9.37 
10 50 1 9.30 
10.56 9 56 
11.04 10.01 
11.15 10.15 
P.M. P.M. 




8.01 


!■> 40 


fPedro Miguel Jc 


7.50 






11.08 ' 5.18 
11.00 5.10 


7.43 


12 54 




7.35 


1.05 
A.M. 


Arr. Panama. Lv. 


10.50 

A.M. 


5.00 
P.M. 


7.25 
P.M. 


71 




11 9 


7 


5 


3 


tTelegraph station. 


1 


2 


4 


6 


8 



Northward main-line passenger trains will \v3.\i at Pedro Miguel Junction for connections from Bas Obispo shuttle train, and northward Bas Obispo shuttle 
trains will wait at Pedro Miguel Junction for soutliward main line connections unless other^vise instructed. 

~ PANAMA-BAS OBISPO PASSENGER TRAIN TIME TABLE. 



SOUTHWARD. 



SECOND CLASS. 



Sunday 
only. 



55 I 5.? 



P. M. A. M. 



11.40 

11.46 

11.52; 

11.. S8: 

A.M.! 

12.12' 

12.15 

12.211 2.11 

12.29! 2.19 

12.32, 

12.40 

P. M.A. M. 



1.30 
1.36 
1.42 
1.48 

2.02 
2.05 



2.22 
2.30 



DaUy; 
e.x. 
Sun. 



51 



Daily. 



49 I 47 / 45 / 43 / 41 



Station. 



P.M. 
10.55 
11.01 
11.07; 
11.13 



P. M. P. M. P. M.A. M.'A. M. 
7.10 1.45 1.35 10., 10' 7.10 Leave fBas Obispo 

7.16 4 51 1.41 10.36 7.16 tLas Cascadas . 



NORTHWARD. 



SECOND CLASS. 



Daily. 



40 



!2 4.57; 1.47110.42 
7.28 5.03 1.53,10.48 



7.42 5 17 

7.4S' 5.20 

7.51 5.26 

7.59 5.34 

8.02! 5.37 

IC 5.4 



11.27 
11.30 
■.1 36 
11 .44 
11.47 
II 55 
P. M. P. M. P. M 



55 ( 53 51 49 i 47 



2.07 11.02 
2.1011 0.'' 
2.1f>'ll.ll 
2.2411.19 
2.2711.2; 
2.3511.3C 
P. M. A. M 



7.22: tEmpire 

7 . 28 ' tCulebra 



7 . 42 tParaiso Jet 

7.4o tPedro Miguel Jet. 

7.51 Miraflores 

7 59 ttorozal 

8 .02 Diablo 

8.10 Arrive tPanama. 

\. M. 



A. M 
7.00 
6.54 
6.48 
6.41 

6.2; 



42 



A. M 
9.30 
9.24 
9.1s 
9.11 

8.57 






6.25 
6.18' 8 4i 



44 I 46 r 48 



P. M.'P. M 



1.15 

1 09 

1.0.' 

12.56 



41 



tTelegraph station. 



12.4; 

12. 4( 

12.3 

6.10 8.40 12.2 

5.07 8.17 12.2. 

6.00 8 3012.1 

A. M.'A. M. P. M 

40 I 42 I 44 



Daily 
ex. i 
Sun. 



P. M. P. M 
7.0010.30 



4. PC 
i.Si 
3.4!- 
3.41 

3.27 
3 25 
3.18 
3.1c 
3.07 
3.0c 
». M IP. M.P. M. 

46 ! 48 50 



6.5410 24 


(>.W 


10.18 


6.41 


10.11 


6.27 


9.57 


6.25 9.55 


6.18' 9.4!< 


6.10 9.4(1 


6.07 9 37 


6.00 


9. 10 



Sunday 
only. 



52 I 54 



A. M 
1.20 
1.14 
1.08 
1.01 



P.M. 
11.30 
11.24 
11. l* 
11.11 



12.47 10-57 
12.45 10.55 
12.3S'I0.48 
12.31)110.40 



12.2 
12.20 
A. M 



10.37 
10.30 
P.M. 

54 



COLON-GATUN SHUTTLE TRAIN SERVICE. 

Effective Monday, October 6, 1913, shuttle trains will be operated daily, between Colon and Gatun, on the following schedule, 
making stops as shown: 



SOUTHWARD. 


Station. 


NORTHWARD. 


SECOND CLASS. 


SECOND CLASS. 


131 


129 127 i 125 123 


121 


122 


124 


126 


128 


130 


132 


P.M. 


P. M. P. M. A.M. A. M. 


A. M. 


Leave. Arrive. 


A. M. 


A.M. 


A.M. 


P. M. ' P. M. 


P. M. 


5.50 
5.52 
S.S4 


4.35 3.30 9.20 ! 7.40 
4.37 , 3.32 V.22 j 7.42 
4 39 , 3.34 9.24 7.44 
4.41 : 3.36 1 9.26 • 7.46 
4.43 3.38 9.2* \ 7.48 
4.47 3.42 9.32 7.52 
4.53 3.48 9.38 ! 7.58 
4.57 3.52 , 9.42 ! 8.02 
5.00 3.55 9.45 ; 8.05 


6.00 
6.02 
6.04 
6 06 
6.08 
6.12 
6.22 
6.26 
6. SO 


7.05 
7.02 
7.00 
6 58 
6 56 
6.52 
6.46 
6 43 
6.40 


9.10 
9.07 
9.05 
9.03 
9.01 
8.57 
8.51 
8.48 
8.45 


10.25 
10.22 
10.20 
10.18 
10 16 
10.12 
10.06 
10.03 
10.00 


4.25 5.45 
4.22 5.42 
4.20 S.40 
4.18 t 5.38 
4.16 ! 5.36 


7.05 


Fiftii Street Colon 


7.02 




7.00 




6.58 


5 58 




6.56 






4.12 
4.06 
4.03 
4.00 


5.32 
5.23 
5.18 
5.13 


6.52 


6.08 
6.12 
6.15 




6.43 




6.38 


Gatun 


6.35 


P. M. 


P. M. j P. M. A. M. K. M. 


A.M. 


Arrive. Leave. 

Trains stop at all stations. 


A. M. 


A.M. 


A. M. 


P. M. 


P.M. 


P.M. 


131 


129 127 125 123 


121 


122 


124 


126 1 128 l.in 


I.« 



Additonal Precautions in Case of Fires in Panama. 

In order to avoid any delay or misinter- 
pretation of requests when an increased water 
pressure is desired in case of a fire in the city 
of Panama, the gong in the Ancon pumping 
station will be connected with the new Game- 
well automatic fire alarm system, which has 
been recently installed in Panama, and is 
now ready for ser\-ice. The Panama fire 
brigade has been furnished with a] copy of 
the printed fire alarm signals in effect in the 



Canal Zone, so that they may be translated 
into Spanish and adopted for use by the 
Panama fire companies. 



Numbering of Macljines in Balboa Shops. 

All machines transferred from other shops 
to Balboa shops, and all new machines pur- 
chased and installed at that point, will be 
numbered consecutively from one upward. All 
machine tools, whether stationary or portable, 
including overhead cranes, jib cranes, air 



compressors, furnaces, forges, boilers, blowers, 
fans, etc., will be carried on one list, and 
numbered consecutively. A separate list 
of motors, generators, switchboards, etc., 
will be kept, and the articles thereon will be 
numbered consecutively also, beginning with 
one. When an article on any one of these 
lists is condemned or sold, its number will 
be left vacant, and will not again be assigned. 
A record will be kept of the old serial numbers 
of the machines that are renumbered. 



44 



THE CANAL RECORD 



Vol. VII, No. 6. 



SOCIAL LIFE OF THE ZONE. 



Ancon Study Club, ^ 

The Ancon Study Club held a reception in 
honor of its retiring president, Mrs. H. W. 
Shick, at the home of Mrs. Mark White on 
Monday afternoon, September 29. Invi- 
tations had been issued to many of Mrs. 
Shick's friends and there were about 25 
present. Mrs. Shick is leaving the. 
Isthmus for Vancouver, and the reception 
was in the nature of a farewell from her 
friends and associates. Mrs. Shick has been 
prominent in the woman's club work since 
its beginning. She was the first secretary 
of the Pedro Miguel Woman's Club, and 
later was its president. She was one of the 
founders of the Ancon Study Club, and has 
been the president of the organization since 
January, 1913. The club presented her with 
a piece of carved ivory as a souvenir of her 
Isthmian residence. 

The membership of the Ancon Study Club 
will be limited to 18. This action has been 
taken with a view to keeping the club small 
enough to continue to meet in the home of 
Mrs. White, where the library is installed, 
and to prevent the introduction of any out- 
side interest other than the study for which 
the club was formed. A waiting list will be 
kept and those registered will be voted in, 
in order of their application, as vacancies 
occur. At its meeting on September 11, 
the club voted S5 toward the playground of 
the Methodist mission school in Panama. 



Church Notes. 

The Sunday school of the Methodist 
Episcopal Church on the sea wall, Panama, 
will hold its annual rally on Sunday morning, 
October 5, at 10 o'clock. The regular official 
program issued by the Methodist church in 
the United States will be used. This consists 
of hymns, recitations, and speeches. The 
pastor, the Rev. Harry Compton, will deliver 
an address on Sunday school work. The prog- 
ram will be repeated in Spanish in the evening 
at 7.30 o'clock for the benefit of the Spanish- 
speaking members of the church. 

The regular monthly meeting of the Wo- 
man's Foreign Missionary Society of the 
Methodist church will be held in the church 
rooms on Saturday afternoon, October 4, 
at 2.30 o'clock. At this meeting it is re- 
quested that delegates from other societies 
of church workers in the Canal Zone be 
present as the nature of the permanent 
organization for the centralization of the work 
will be discussed at this time and some definite 
plan will be adopted. The outlook is for a 
Canal Zone society, which will unite the 
women in Christian effort, to be composed of 
different societies, each working on independ- 
ent lines, denominational or otherwise, but 
the central society will be undenominational. 
All women interested in this plan are invited 
to be present. 

The junior Sunday school class of the 
Church of the Sacred Heart, Ancon Hospital, 
is preparing for first communion and confir- 
mation, which will be held on Sunday, De- 
cember 7. The class meets for instruction 
at 4 o'clock on Monday, Wednesday, and 
Friday afternoons of each week at the home 
of Mrs. M. H. Fowler, Ancon. The parents 
of these children are earnestly requested to see 
that their attendance at the meetings is 
punctual and regular. 

The Rev. Father Ferdinand Allot, priest 



of St. Ferdinand's Church, Empire, sailed 
for New York on the Panama on Monday, 
September 29. He will sail from there to 
France where he will spend his vacation of 
two months. The Rev. Father McDonald 
will be in charge of the work of the church 
and parish during the absence of Father 
Allot. 

A series of organ recitals is arranged to be 
held at Christ Church, Colon, on the second 
Sunday evening in each month. The first 
number of the series was given on Sunday, 
September 14, when a program of Schubert's 
music was played. Recitals of the works of 
other composers will follow. In each case the 
program is introduced by a short biographical 
sketch of the composer whose works are to be 
played. The concerts follow immediately after 
evensong, which begins at 7.30 o'clock. 



Record of J-Yard Cube Mixer at Battery Parke. 

The following table shows consecutive 
three weeks' concrete output from a j-yard 
mixer, working in connection with the con- 
struction of Battery Parke, at Naos Island: 

BATTERY PARKE. 



Date. 


Hours 
Worked. 


Output 
cu. yds. 


Rate per Hour, 
cu. yds. 


August 25 

August 26 

August 27 

August 28 

August 29 

August 30 


9 
9 
9 
9 
9 
8 


220 

217 
111 
238 
231 
208 




Total 


Si 


1,336 


25.20 








September 2.. . . 
Spetember 3.. . . 
Spetember 4... . 
September 5... . 
September 6... . 


9 
9 
9 

I 


219 
221 
239 
231 
205 




Total 


44 


1.115 


25.34 


September S... 
September 9.. . 
September 10... 
September 11... 
September 12... 
September 13... 


9 
9 
9 
9 
9 
8 


202 
224 
247 
218 
229 
209 




Total 


S3 


1 ,329 


25.07 


Grand total. . 


150 


3.780 


25.20 



The mixer worked nine liDurs a day.excef.t Saturdays, 
when it worked eight hours. It was fed from the storage 
piles nearby, by wheelbarrows, using elevating hopper 
for feeding the mixer drum and dumping into wooden 
chutes, which carried the concrete to the forms. Mr. 
R. Brewerton was the foreman in charge of mixer. 



Afternoon Ilearinii.s by Joint Land Commission 
Discontinued. 

The Joint Land Commission will discon- 
tinue the afternoon hearings, which have been 
held by individual members of the Commission 
on Mondays, Wednesdays, Fridays, and Satur- 
days of each week for the purpose of hearing 
claims of landholders, in view of the depart- 
ure of Dr. Rowe, leaving but three members 
on the Commission. 

Due notice will be given when further 
hearings of this kind are to be resumed. 



Yom Kippur Services. 

Yom Kippur services will be conducted 
in the synagogue at Third and F streets. 
Colon, on Friday evening, October 10, begin- 
ning at 6 30, and on Saturday, October 11, 
beginning at 8.30 a. m. 

All Israelites in the Canal Zone are cordially 
invited. V. C. Pinto, Secretary, 

Kaal Kadosh Yangacob. 



END OF OLD P. R. R. STATION. 

Has Served as Panama Passenger Terminal for 
Twenty-seven Years. 

The last portions of the old railroad station, 
which has served the Panama Railroad Com- 
pany as a passenger terminal in Panama for a 
period of over 27 years, were removed on 
Wednesday, September 24, in furtherance of 
the work of improving the ground about the 
new terminal building. Prior to 1884, the 
railroad company's passenger trains ran into 
the ancient station in the vicinity of the 
American wharf. The company's annual 
report for 1884 states: 

"The large increase of passenger business has 
rendered additional accommodations for that 
department indispensable, and the passenger depot 
has been removed from its old location to a point 
near the bridge and adjoining the Savanna road. 
A temporary house and platform have been erected 
there, and are now being used for passenger ac- 
commodations pending the arrival of material to 
build a new depot, which has been ordered for 
some time." 

Although the report states that the material 
had been ordered for some time, it was ex- 
ceedingly slow in coming, for the report of 

1885 reiterates: 

"The great need, however, at this station 
(Panama), as well as at Aspinwall (Colon) is a new 
depot with enclosures, so that the ticket system 
may be put into effect at once. Your company 
has land at both places in desirable locations." 

During the year 1885, extensive repairs 
were made to the Panama wharves; the 
English wharf was extended and the shed over 
the American wharf rebuilt. The report for 

1886 announced the erection of a new iron 
station, the one that has just been torn down, 
as well as an iron station in Colon, which for- 
merly stood at the head of Front street and 
was razed when the new terminal was com- 
pleted on July 23, 1909, in the following words: 

"these stations were contracted for in New 
York by your company in May, 1886, and have 
been serit out and erected during the year. They 
will be ready for occupation on the 15th of March 
the present year (1887). The ticket system spoken 
of in the report for 1885 will then be put into effect, 
as all the arrangements for inaugurating this sys- 
tem are now perfected." 

The old depot, near the American wharf, 
the first building erected by the Panama 
Railroad Company in Panama, was de- 
molished in 1886 on account of its age and 
general insanitary condition. After the re- 
moval of the passenger business to temporary 
quarters on the site of the recent iron station 
in 1884. the upper floor of the old station was 
used as quarters for employes, and the lower 
floor as a transportation office for the French 
canal company. Two wooden buildings were 
immediately erected on its site, with suitable 
enclosures and a garden between, one for 
the engineers and mechanical department, 
and the other for the conductors and the clerks 
in the freight station. There was also con- 
structed the same year, in the Panama rail- 
road yard, a two-story wooden house of eight 
rooms, which furnished quarters at that time 
for the assistant roadmaster, section master, 
yardmaster, and assistant. These men for- 
merly roomed in the town at a cost to the com- 
pany for commutation of 100 soles (about $95) 
a month. Two of the buildings above re- 
ferred to are still standing, and in service. 

Mr. George A. Burt was general superin- 
tendent of the railroad in 1884, but was suc- 
ceeded during the following year by Mr. 
Frank G. Ward, who, in turn, in 181:7, gave 
way to Mr. A. L. Rives. The president of 
the company at this period was Mr. J. G. 
McCuUough. 



October 1, 1913. 



THE CANAL RECORD 



45 



CANAL WORK IN AUGUST. 

Monthly Report of the Chairman and Chief 
Engineer to the Secretary of War. 

CuLEBRA, C. Z., September 21, 1913. 

The Honorable the Secretary of War, 

Washington, D. C. 

Sir: I have the honor to submit the follow- 
ing report of operations on the Isthmus for 
the month of August, 1913: 

EfTective August 9, 1913, Richard L. Met- 
calfe was appointed a member of the Isth- 
mian Canal Commission and on that day 
entered upon his duties as Head of the De- 
partmefit of Civil Administration. 
Department of Construction and Engineering. 

The following table summarizes the princi- 
pal items of work accomplished by the con- 
struction divisions during the month: 



livercd at the port of Ancon. 

INSPECTION AND ERECTION OF OPERATING MA- 
CHINERY AND ELECTRICAL EQUIPMENT. 

l^alve machines — The present status of the 
mechanical erection is, as follows; Rising 
stem valve machines, 95 per cent completed; 
cylindrical valve machines, 100 per cent 
completed ; auxiliar}' culvert valve machines, 
100 per cent completed. The electrical in- 
stallation of the above machines is 50 per 
cent complete for the rising stem valve, SO 
per cent complete for the cylindrical valve, 
and 65 per cent complete for the auxi!iar\- cul- 
vert valve machines. The mechanical erection 
of the IS guard valve machines is 77 per cent 
complete, and the electrical installation for 
these machines is IS per cent complete. 

Miter gate moving machines — Eighty-nine 
per cent of the mechanical, and 29 percent of 
the electrical installation, is completed. 



Item. 


Unit. 


Atlantic. 


Central. 


2d Div. 


5th Div. 


6th Div. 


Total. 




Cubic yds.. . 
Cubic yds.. . 

Cubic yds. . . 

Cubic yds. . . 


2.161 
512,089 


810,100 
*83.200 


90,134 
1286.127 


103,014 


1.005.409 


Work excavation, wet. 


726,256 
726,256 


1,607.672 








Total work excavation 


514.250 


893.300 


376,261 


103.014 


2,613.081 


Plant excavation, dry. 




33,600 


12,104 






45,704 




Cubic yds.. . 
Cubic yds. . . 

Cubic yds. . . 

Tons (Gross) 

Feet 

Miles 

Miles 










Total Canal excava- 


514,250 


926,900 


388,365 


103,014 


726,256 


2,658,785 








73.797 






18.350 




92,147 












Concrete placed, locks. 


8,680 

13.18 
12,075 

1.22 

1.34 






8,058 

22.65 
40,522 




16.738 

176.36 
307,540 


Explosives ut-ed 

Rock drilled 


81.14 
195,422 
9.35 


1439 

44,734 
4.45 
6.79 


45.00 
14.787 




New track laid 


0.65 

43,850 
7,479 




8 78 












Barrels 

Miles 


13,944 


50 


8,129 


21 


29.623 


New roads built 




Feet 

Feet 


920 










920 














Open drains and ditches 


Feet 






4,850 
2,993 
6.74 






4.850 
18 871 






3,111 
15.11 


6.301 
11.82 


4,130 
5.46 


2.336 

6.74 


Average rainfall 


Inch^ 


11.28 



♦Removed by Fifth Division for Central Division. 
tRemoved by Sixtli Division for the Second Division. 

First Division — Office of the Chief F.ngineer. 

LOCK GATE AND PROTECTIVE DEVICES. 

All material for the 92 leaves has been com- 
pleted and shipped, as well as that for the 
spare parts. 

The status of the work in the several locks 
may be summarized, as follows: 

Calun — Work was in progress on all the 
leaves, 40 in number: Erection. 99.7 per cent 
completed ; reaming, 99.9 per cent completed ; 
riveting, 99. S per cent completed; finishing, 
84.27 per cent completed. 

Pedro Miguel — Work was in progress on 
the entire 24 leaves: Erection, 99 per cent 
completed ; reaming, 99.7 per cent completed ; 
riveting, 97 per cent completed; finishing, 
80.21 percent completed. 

Miraflores — Work was in progress on all 
of the 28 leaves: Erection, 97 per cent com- 
pleted; reaming, 98.5 per cent completed; 
riveting, 90 per cent completed; finishing, 
63.7 per cent completed. 

ERECTION. 

On September 1st, 99.2 per cent of the total 
tonnage of lock gate material in all locks had 
been erected. There are still to be erected 
44 tons at Gatun. 52 tons at Pedro Miguel, 
and 546 tons at Miraflores. 

LOCK ENTRANCE CAISSON. 

On August 20, award was made to the 
Union Iron Works, for the construction of 
one lock entrance caisson at §330,760, de- 



Miter gate forcing machines — The mechani- 
cal erection is 29 per cent, and the electrical 
installation, 25 per cent completed. 

Track — Appro.\imately 85 per cent of all 
track is complete with concrete. Thirty- 
three per cent of single, and 66 per cent of 
double crossovers, have been placed. 

Spillway gate machines — The mechanical 
erection is 73 per cent, and the electrical 
erection, 15 per cent accomplished. 

Pumps — Mechanical erection is 59 per 
cent complete on miter gate sump pumps, 
11 per cent complete on chain fender sump 
pumps, 100 per cent complete on drainage 
sump pumps, and 66 per cent on culvert 
pumps. Electrical installation is 19 per cent 
complete on miter gate sump pumps, and 50 
per cent complete on drainage sump pumps. 

Transformer room equipment — The instal- 
lation of this equipment is 67 per cent com- 
plete at Gatun, 55 per cent complete at 
Pedro Miguel, and 39 per cent complete at 
Miraflores. For all the locks, this work is 
appro.ximately 55 per cent complete. 

Hydroelectric station — All foimdalions have 
been built, and the three turbines and their 
penstocks are set complete. The head gates 
are also in place. 

Ca6/e— Out of a total of 2,413,216 feet of 
cable on order, 671,755 linear feet have been 
pulled into the ducts. 

Control houses — Si.xty-si.\ per cent of the 
steel beams for control house floors have been 



placed in concrete. The control house at 
Gatun is ready to receive the roof. Con- 
struction of the control house at Pedro Miguel 
has progressed to about the same point. 

Illumination — At Gatun, the erection of the 
lamp posts, with cross-arms, is 75 per cent 
complete. At Pedro iMiguel, 32 poles, without 
cross-arms, have been set. 

Transmission line — Surveys were made 
from Mile 19 to Mile 26, inclusive, for the 
location of track-span bridges, and stakes were 
set for the alignment of concrete forms be- 
tween Miles 40 and 41. During the month, 
92 foundations for track-span bridges were 
placed to carry the transmission line, making 
a total of 161 foundations set to the close of 
the month. 

EMERGENCY DAMS. 

Gatun east dam — This dam has been com- 
pleted, tested, and accepted. 

Gatun west dam — This dam has been com- 
pleted, tested, and accepted. The final tests 
of this dam were made during the month. 
The actual operating time of the various 
machines was practically the same as for the 
east dam at Gatun, as reported for the month 
of June. 

Pedro Miguel west dam — All material has 
been delivered at the site. The pouring of 
concrete for the operator's house is finished. 
On August 28, this dam was swung across the 
lock for the purpose of making necessary ad- 
justments. Riveting is complete. Painting 
of the dam continued during the month. 

Pedro Miguel east dam — All material has 
been delivered at the site. During the month, 
a total of 14 tons of turning and wedging ma- 
chinery was assembled and bolted in place. 
The switchboard house was completed. In- 
stallation of gate and girder hoisting ma- 
chinery continued during the month. Rivet- 
ing is complete. Painting continued during 
the month. 

Miraflores west dam — A total of 1,890 tons 
of material was delivered at the site. 

Miraflores east dam — All material has been 
delivered at the site. During the month, a 
a total of 412 tons of turning and wedging 
machinery was assembled and bolted in place. 
Riveting is about 15 percent complete. 

AIDS TO N.WIGATION. 

Duiing the month, work was in progress 
erecting tower No. 10, Gatun Lake section, 
water stage registers at Gamboa, delivering 
material for the construction of beacon foun- 
dation at Bohio, and water stage register at 
the Gatun spillway; casting lamp bracket 
arms, lifting sockets in drain covers for chain 
fender pits, and beacon tops at the pile cast- 
ing platform in Gatun; constructing trans- 
mission line across the Cut at Gamboa, clear- 
ing land for the Sixth Division, and making 
the necessarj' surveys and reconnoissances 
in connection with the construction of range 
towers, targets, beacons, etc. 
Second Division — Office of the Chief Engineer. 
SHOPS. 

The designing and preparation of drawings 
for machine foundations, motorizing of ma- 
chines, installation of machines, shafting, 
and motors for group drives were continued. 
The incorporation of architectural features 
in the designs of the general storehouse and of 
the o.xygen-acetylene gas building was com- 
pleted. The design and layout in pencil of 
the electrical power distribution systems in 
the machine and erecting shop, the forge 
shop, and the boiler and shipfitter shop were 



46 



THE CANAL RECORD 



Vol. VII, No. 6. 



completed, including the switchboard, trans- 
formers, and motor-generator sets to be in- 
stalled in the machine shop for supplying 
direct current for variable-speed motors. 
The design and general layout of the illumina- 
tion systems in the administration building, 
machine and erecting shop, and the forge 
shop were completed, and requisition sub- 
mitted for the material to be imbedded in 
concrete walls of the administration building. 
The layout of piping and plumbing systems 
in the administration building was completed, 
and requisition for the material submitted. 
During the month, requisitions were sub- 
mitted for all pipe and fittings to be installed 
in the pipe and conductor tunnel; for the 
transformers, switchboards, wiring, conduit, 
reflectors, etc., for the power and illumina- 
tion systems in the foundry' and planing mill; 
for the steel rolling doors for closing the ends 
of the machine and erecting shop, the forge 
shop, the boiler shop, and the foundry, and 
for the structural steel for the shop office 
building. Award was made for the slate 
stalls for nine toilet buildings, for six 5-ton 
cranes for the forge shop, and for one 500-ton 
forging press. The deliver>- oh the Isthmus 
of all structural steel for Buildings 1 to 26, 
inclusive, and for the shafting supports in 
the machine and erecting shop was completed. 
The cement tile roofing is complete on the 
oxy-acetylene building, and 70 per cent com- 
plete on the machine and erecting shop. The 
pattern shop and foundry were transferred 
from Gorgona to Balboa. The first pour of 
bronze was made on August 14, and of iron, 
on August 20. 

EXCAVATION AKD CONSTRUCTION. 

On the site of the coaling plant, dry dock 
No. 1, and the entrance basin, there w-ere 
72,006 cubic yards of earth, and 30,232 cubic 
yards of rock excavated, of which 90,134 
cubic yards were w-ork excavation and 12,104 
cubic yards were plant excavation, a total of 
102,238 cubic yards. For fill and embank- 
ment in preparation of site, cofferdam, rail- 
road yard tracks, construction tracks, shop 
tunnel, dikes, etc., there were 107,044 cubic 
yards of excavation, of which 53.158 cubic 
yards were work excavation and 53,886 cubic 
yards were plant excavation. Six thousand, 
three hundred and sixty cubic yards of con- 
crete were placed, in connection with shop 
foundations, shops, tunnel, caissons, quay 
walls, etc., which involved the use of 527,786 
pounds of reinforcing steel. A total of 27,912 
feet of piles was driven for shops and ma- 
chinery foundations, operating tunnel, coffer- 
dam, trestles, and alteration to sand dock, 
which consisted of 20,430 linear feet of wooden 
piles, 6,540 linear feet of sheet piling, and 
942 linear feet of pipe piles. The total 
amount of track laid was 35,892 feet, and 
23,495 feet of track were removed. The fol- 
lowing work was performed on the quay walls 
and pier: Seventy-three linear feet of super- 
structure completed, 2,848 linear feet of 
caisson manufactured, and 39 piers were sunk 
to rock; 2,597.5 linear feet of caisson were 
sunk to rock, which is the largest amount of 
caisson work ever performed on the Isth- 
mus in one month. 

Fifth Division— Office of the Chief Engineer. 
DISTRICT NO. 1 — LOCKS, DAMS, AND DRY EX- 
CAVATION. 

Excavation — The total excavation amounted 
to 103,014 cubic yards, of which 72,904 cubic 



yards were classified as rock, and 30,110 cubic 
yards as earth. 

Fining and embankment — Dry filling in the 
prism of the west dam at Pedro Miguel was 
increased by 1,750 cubic yards, making the 
total amount of material used for this pur- 
pose 699,518 cubic yards. The backfill at 
Pedro Miguel was increased by 3,710 cubic 
yards, the total quantity in place at the close 
of the month being 1,023,913 cubic yards. 
At Miraflores, dr\' filling in the west dam was 
increased by 16,600 cubic yards, making the 
total quantities of dr>- and hydraulic filling 
in place at the close of the month 1,684,949 
cubic yards and 661,048 cubic yards, re- 
spectively. The backfill at IMiraflores was 
increased by 79,021 cubic yards, the total 
quantity in place on August 31 being 1,900,- 
759 cubic yards. 

Pedro Migtiel Lock — Work consisted prin- 
cipally in loading out obsolete tracks and 
materials no longer needed, cleaning up, and 
grading off the IjackfiU. Installation of the 
wooden fenders on the ends of the north and 
south guide walls was continued. The control 
house was made ready for the installation of 
the roof trusses. 

OPERATION OFTHEAUXILIARY CONCRETE CONSTRUCTION 
PLANT AT PEDRO MIGUEL. 

Length of working day (hours) 8 .00 

Average number of iiours per day worked 

laying concrete, actual working time. ... 2.28 

Average number of mixers per day .35 

Average hourly output per mixer, actual 

worliing time (cubic yards) 7.81 

Concrete laid (cubic y ards) 1.308 00 

One J-yard mixer was in service intermittently. 

Miraflores Lock — Work in the locks proper 
was confined chiefly to the dismantling of 
berm cranes G and H, loading out of 
obsolete tracks and material, and general 
cleaning up. Chamber cranes Nos. 1 and 
3 were dismantled by the contractors. Back- 
filling of the northeast and northwest 
wing walls was continued, and the filling of 
the middle and guide walls completed. 
Steamsho\els continued to remove the dikes 
and high grojnd in the forebay of the locks 
and the excavation of the west forebay was 
finished. At the close of the month, the 
concrete work of the Miraflores spillway was 
completed, e.xcept for the opening left in the 
dam; the piers had been brought to grade; 
the footbridges were in position; the steel 
gates were in place in front of the openings, 
and four of them were in final posicion. Dry 
excavation in the prism south of the locks 
was practically completed, all equipment was 
removed, and the waters of the Rio Grande 
diverted into the prism between the locks 
and the dike. When the water in the prism 
reached elevation minus 29, the dike was 
blown up and, with the admission of the sea 
water, the prism was soon completely filled. 

OPERATION OF THE PERMANENT AND AUXILI.^RY CON- 
CRETE CONSTRUCTION PLANTS AT MIRAFLORES. 



DISTRICT NO. 4 ANCON QUARRY. 

PERFORMANCE OF ROCK CRUSHER PLANT. 





Permanent 
Plant. 


Auxiliary 
Plant. 


Length of working day (hours) . 

Average number of hours per 

day worked laying concrete. 


8.00 

.35 
2.00 

19.23 
39.11 


8.00 
1.58 


Average number of mixer; per 


.23 


Average hourly output per mix- 
er, actual working time (cu- 


7.63 


Average amount of concrete laid 
per hour per berra or chamber 
crane, actual working time 








Total concrete laid (cubic yards) 


2.844.00 


3,180.00 



Length of working day (hours) 

Average number of hours per day. actual 

working time 

Average number of cubic yards crtished per 

hour per working day 

Average number of cubic yards crushed per 

working hour 

Total output for the month (cubic yards) . . . 



8.00.12.00 

6 95 

171.96 

242.84 
43,850.00 



Permanent plani — One berm and one chamber crane. 
Auxiliary plant — One i-yard mixer, one l-j-ard mixer, 
and locomotive cranes and derricks averaging 1.73 
units per da> . 



12-hour day from 1 1th to 18th, inclusive. 
DISTRICT NO. 5 GOLD HILL SLUICING PLANT. 

Excavation during the month totaled 
83,181 cubic yards; this unfavorable showing 
was due to pump troubles, line breakages, 
and the necessity of cutting through hea\^ 
rock, in order to extend the flume on proper 
grade into the area of active slides. 

Sixth Division — Office of the Chief Engineer. 
PACIFIC END. 

Seven dredges were engaged in channel and 
inner harbor excavation at Balboa, removing 
465,457 cubic yards of earth and 260,799 
cubic yards of rock from the Canal prism, and 
286,127 cubic yards of earth from the inner 
harbor and terminal basin site, a total of 
1,012,383 cubic yards. At the close of the 
month, there remained to be removed from 
the Canal prism, not including fill, 2,564,838 
cubic yards. The French ladder dredge 
Gopher, engaged in sand excavation at Punta 
Chame during tlie entire month, removed 
16,100 cubic yards. 

ATLANTIC END. 

Nine dredges were in operation during the 
month, removing 487,600 cubic yards of 
earth and 24,489 cubic yards of rock from the 
Canal prism. On August 31, there remained 
to be excavated 1,023,651 cubic yards. In 
addition to prism excavation, 171,851 cubic 
yards of coral sand from Margarita Bay, 
6,651 cubic yards of earth from between piers 
Nos. 2 and 3 at Colon, 3,500 cubic yards of 
earth and coal from the coal dock slip, 21,564 
cubic yards of coral sand from along the 
south side of pier No. 17, and 8,139 cubic yards 
of earth and 2,850 cubic yards of coral from 
around the corners of piers Nos. 15 and 16 
and along the face of pier No. 15, were taken 
out. At the close of the month, 40 feet of 
water could be carried from zero to zero plus, 
2,100 feet; 35 feet to mile post 6, plus 2,300 
feet; 30 feet to mile post 6, plus 2,320 feet; 
20 feet to mile post 6. plus 2,350 feet; 10 feet 
to mile post 6, plus 2,800 feet, at the barrier 
across the Canal. 

Division of Municipal Engineering— Office of the 

Chief Engineer. 

NORTHERN DISTRICT. 

The construction of the new Colon water- 
works progressed satisfactorily. During the 
month, the main floor of the filter buildiiig 
was finished, work in the sedimentation basin 
practically completed, and in the aeration 
basin all concrete was in place except the 
lamp posts. The Colon improvements were 
practically completed, with the exception of a 
small amount of curb and gutter on_ the 
west side of G street. The ubual mainte- 
nance of the streets, sewers, and water system 
was carried on in Cristobal, Gatun, and 
New Gatun. 

SOUTHERN DISTRICT. 

At Balboa, the construction of the storm 
sewer in the new American townsite, and work 
on the West Indian townsite were continued. 
The usual maintenance work on sewer and 
water systems, streets, and roads was per- 
formed. 

New Panama waterworks — Work was con- 



October 1, 1913. 



THE CANAL RECORD 



47 



tinued on excavation for the building and 
pump sump of Mirafiorcs pump station No. 1. 
The concrete foundation for the intake house 
was completed and work on the walls was well 
under way at the end of the month. Exca- 
vation in connection with the Miraflores filtra- 
tion plant was continued and the site for the 
wash water tank was cleared. On August 
5, work was commenced on the Ancon high 
service reservoir. 

Atlantic Division. 
G.-^TUN LOCKS. 

The month's excavation totaled 18,543 
cubic yards. The backfill placed during 
August amounted to 18,608 cubic yards; at 
the close of the month, the backfill was 97.08 
per cent completed. 

Reccivittg and issiihig malcrial — The issues 
of rock amounted to 8,927 cubic yards. Sand 
receipts amounted to 2,582 cubic yards, the 
issues to 3,398 cubic yards. Cement re- 
ceipts totaled 8,414i barrels, and the issues 
amounted to 8,904i barrels. 

Coiicrele work — A total of 200 cubic yards of 
concrete was laid, distributed, as follows: 
Upper locks, 24 cubic yards; lower locks, 
176 cubic yards. The locks masonry is 
practically completed. 

OPERATION OF CONCRETE CONSTRUCTION PLANT. 

L*ength of working day (hours) 8 . 00 

Average number of hours per day worked, 

per strand of cableway, laying concrete. 

actual working time. . . : 296 

Average number of mixers per day 2 . 00 

Average hourly output per mixer, actual 

working time (cubic yards) 60 00 

Average amount of concrete laid per hour. 

per strand of cableway, actual working 

time (cub ic yards 29.42 

(Concrete laid (cu. yds.), cableways 1,813 
Concrete laid (cu. yds.), portable 

mixers 318 

Concrete laid (cu. yds.), hand mixed 103 
Concrete laid (cu. yds.) transmission 

duct line 197 

Total amount of concrete laid (cu.'yds.) . . . 2,431.00 
G.A.TUN DAM. 

Construction during the month increased 
the total fill, as determined by car measure- 
ment, 78,795 cubic yards, making the total 
amount in place 21,962,362 cubic yards. On 
September 1, the dam was 99.83 per cent com- 
pleted. Additions to the dry fill amounted to 
73,797 cubic yards, which were placed on the 
north and south toes of the dam, east and west 
of the spillway, making the total dry fill in 
place 11,743,950 cubic yards. 

GATUN SPILLWAY. 

Concrete laid during the month amounted 
to 2,104 cubic yards, making the total quan- 
tity in place 227;749 cubic >ards. Concrete 
work was 99.45 per cent completed at the 
close of the month. 

Hydroelectric plant — The total excavation 
reported for July was not increased. During 
the month, 924 cubic yards of concrete were 
placed, making a total of 6,675 cubic yards. 

WEST BREAKWATER — COLON. 

Out of a total of 24,026 cubic yards of 
Porto Belle rock placed on the breakwater 
during August, 8,247 cubic yards were un- 
loaded by cranes and 15,799 cubic yards by 
derrick barges. The total amount placed 
upon the breakwater to September 1 was 
296,693 cubic yards. 

Central Division. 

The total amount of material excavated 
during the month was 843,700 cubic yards, 
of which 185,441 cubic yards were classified 
as earth and 658,259 cubic yards as rock. 
The entire amount was removed by steam- 
shovels, 810,100 cubic yards being classified 



as primary excavation and 33,600 cubic yards 
as plant excavation. Of the total primary 
excavation, 245,000 cubic yards were taken 
from within the lines of the Canal prism, 
and 648,300 cubic yards from without the 
Canal prism, the latter amount being exca- 
vated from slides, and from high levels as a 
preventive measure against slides. 

The daily average number of steamshovel? 
at work was 34.65, and the total number of 
shovel days was 901, as compared with 40.74 
shovels at work and 1,018 shovel days in 
July. For comparison with the work done by 
steamshovels during the corresponding month 
of the previous year, the following table is 
presented: 



Period 


Excava- 
ted by 
shovels. 


Classification of 
material. 


ZiSS 




•Si 

>. « rt 




Rock. 


Earth. 


^-s« 


^ 


ik 


1912: 

Aug. 
1913: 

Aug-. 


Cu. yds. 

1,094.132 

843.'00 


Cu. yds. 

696.535 

658.259 


Cu. yds. 

197.597 

1S5,441 


34.11 
34.65 


27 
26 


c. y. 

1,187.93 
936.00 



Rainfall at Empire: 1912. 10.53 ins.: 1913. 10.46 ins. 
The estimated amount of material removed 
and to be removed, according to the revision 
of July 1, 1913, is 115,696,455 cubic yards. 
Up to September 1, 1913, 108,931, 3.S5 cubic 
yards had been removed, leaving 6,765,100 
cubic yards to be removed, in order to com- 
plete all excavation in this division. At the 
close of the month, 94.15 per cent of all ex- 
cavation was completed. On August 31, 
the status of the work in the two sections 
which compose this division was, as follows: 
CULEBRA CUT. Cubic yards. 

Dry excavation accomplished 96,546,700 

Excavation to be accomplished 6,615.100 

CHAGRES SECTION. 

Dry excavation completed 12,384.655 

Wet excavation to be accomplished 150.000 

Material dumped from the Naos Island 
trestle during the month totaled 31,557 cubic 
yards. 

The daily average number of laborers at 
work was 5,738, while the average number of 
gold men working was 563. 

Quartermaster's Department. 
LABOR. 

The force report of August 27 showed 
39,962 men actually working for the Commis- 
sion and the Panama Railroad Company. 
The actual working forces of the se\-eral con- 
tractors totaled 2.923 men. There was a 
surplus of labor throughout the month. Re- 
ports show an excess of emigration over im- 
migration during the month of about 1,700. 

BUILDINGS. 

The work performed by the building di- 
vision was greater in amount than for any 
previous month since building work was taken 
over by this department ; it was practically all 
rush work. The number of men employed 
was greater than in any single month since 
the erection of quarters for American em- 
ployes in the early days of the work; a great 
deal of overtime was put in. The amount of 
maintenance and repair work on Panama 
railroad buildings, taken over on August 1, 
exceeded anticipations. On February 14, 
it was estimated that 12 gangs of 40 men 
each, working continuously from March 1 
to September 1, would complete the demoli- 
tion and removal of all American buildings 
used as- married and bachelor quarters in 
Gorgona. An average of only eight gangs 
was used and, in addition to work on ."Ameri- 



can quarters, eight French buildings were 
moved and three of them reerectcd, all shop 
buildings were demolished and two of them 
moved and reerected, and the work was com- 
pleted on the date set. 

QUARTERS. 

Save at Ancon and Balboa, ihcri- is no con- 
gestion in bachelor quarters. The transfer 
of families from Gorgona was completed, and 
the regular assignment lists in all districts, 
closed in March last in order the the residents 
of Gorgona might be taken care of, weri" 
opened. The lists of applications for married 
quarters at Cristobal and Colon were con- 
solidated, and the rules governing assign- 
ments to railroad and Commission quarters 
were made uniform. There was a decrease 
in the total number of applications 

MATERIAL AND SUPPLIES. 

The value of material received was $913,- 
142.13. This material came forward in 37 
steamers having a total weight of cargo, ex- 
clusive of lumber, piling, and ties, of 15,942 
tons. Nine million feet of lumber were re- 
ceived during the month; this is the largest 
amount received in any one month dunng 
the American occupation. 

Subsistence Departmeni 

The Hotel Tivoli was operated at a prtjfit 
of $5,621.91. The operation of the line 
hotels, laborers' messes, and restaurants 
resulted in a net profit of $1,725.70. The 
total net profit on subsistence operations 
during the month was $7,347.61. 

Department of Civil AdminLslratloo. 
COURTS. 

During the month, 53 civil and 50 criminal 
cases were disposed of in the circuit courts, 
and 72 civil and 470 criminal cases in the 
district courts. 

POSTS, CUSTOMS, AND REVENUES'. 

Money order sales amounted to $402,985.- 
80, and the fees to $1,890.38. Receipts from 
stamp and card sales and newspaper postage 
aggregated $8,214.22. The total collection of 
revenues was $15,169.18, and the collections 
on account of court fines, costs, and fees, 
$2,755.61. A total of $164,968 was deposited 
in postal savings accounts, and a total of 
$155,489 was withdrawn. At the port of 
Ancon, 20 vessels entered and 21 cleared; at 
the port of Cristobal. 19 entered and 21 
cleared. 

POLICE AND PRISONS 

The total number of persons arrested was 
484, of whom 412 were men and 72 women. 
Fifteen convicts were committed to the peni- 
tentiary and 10 were discharged, leaving 143 
convicts in confinement at the close of the 
month. The cost of guarding and subsisting 
these prisoners was $2,466.25, and the value 
of the work performed by them on the roads 
of the Canal Zone was $2,569.10 

FIRE PROTECTION. 

Ten fires were reported in the Canal Zone. 

The property involved was estimated to be 

worth $35,112. The damage occasioned was 

$60. 

Department of Sanitation. 

The total number of deaths from all causes 
among employes was 39 divided, as follows: 
From disease 21, and from violence 18, giving 
an annual average per thousand of 4.31 and 
3.69, respectively. TTie annual death rate 
per thousand among employes for the month 
of August, 1912, was 10.01. 

The annual average deatli rate per thou- 



48 



THE CANAL RECORD 



Vol. VII, No. 6. 



sand in the Canal Zone, and in the cities of 
Panama and Colon, including both employes 
and nonemploycs, was 24.23. This rate is 
based upon a population in the Canal Zone of 
62,810, according to the census of February, 
1912, and populations in Panama and Colon, 
respectively, of 47, 172 and 20,232, asestimated 
by the Department of Sanitation. The annual 
average death rate per thousand among the 
same classes of population for the month of 
August, 1912, was 25.69. 

Segregating the whites from the blacks, 
the annual average death rate per thousand 
from disease among employes was: Whites, 
2.91; blacks, 4.69, giving a general average 
for disease of 4.31. For the same month dur- 
ing 1911. the annual death rate per thousand 
from disease among whites was 6.45; blacks, 
6.23, giving a general average of 6.27; and 
for the same month in 1912: Whites, 6.91; 
blacks, 7.86, giving a general average of 7.63. 
Among employes, deaths from the principal 
diseases were: Lobar pneumonia, four; ma- 
laria fever, E. A., three; tuberculosis of the 
lungs, three; abscess of the liver, entamoebic, 
two'i leaving nine deaths from all other dis- 
ease's and 18 deaths from external violence. 
', No cases of yellow fever, smallpox, or 
plague originated on, or was brought to the 
Isthmus, during the month. 
Respectfully, 

Geo. W. Goethals. 
Chairman and Chief Engineer. 

♦ 

Red Cross Finances. 
A statement of the finances of the Canal 
Zone Chapter, American National Red Cross, 
for the month of August, 1913, follows: 
receipts: 

August I. On hand $2,101.21 

August 12, Refund for meals fur- 
nisked at Cristobal 

hotel 2.35 

August 31, Membership dues. . . 1 .00 

August 31, Interest credited at 

bank 7.40 

S2.I1I.96 

DISBURSE.MENTS : 

August 5. Deportation of desti- 
tute wife of e.x-em- 
ploye $25.00 

August 5, Postage 2.00 

August 8, Relief of American 

unable to get work . 25.00 

August 19, Relief of destitute 

American, Cristobal 1.75 

August 25, Deportation of 
American lady, An- 
con 30.00 

August 26. Making cat for ad- 
vertising ball.. .. 10. CO 

$93.75 

August 31, Balance on hand S2,018.21 

JOH.N' L. Phillips, 
Approved: Treasurer. 

Edw. Schildhauer. 

Chairman. 

♦ 

Missing Men. 
Any one having information regarding the 
whereabouts of Mr. George Albert Grant, who 
is supposed te be on the Isthmus, is requested 
to communicate with the American Consu- 
late General, Panama. 

Any one having information regarding the 
whereabouts of Mr. Leslie Crawford, who is 
supposed to be on the Isthmus, is requested 
to communicate with Mr. Wm. O. Beckel, 
Box 18, Cristobal. 

Any one having information regarding the 
whereabouts of Mr. J. S. Singer, who is sup- 
posed to be on the Isthmus, is requested to 
•communicate w,ith Mr. G. C. Singer, Hotel 
Veranda, Norristown, Pa. 

Any one having information regarding the 



whereabouts of Mr. John Ryner, who is sup- 
posed to be on the Isthmus, is requested to 
communicate with The Can.\l Record, 
A neon. 



Examinations by Board of Local Inspectors. 

The Board of Local Inspectors will conduct 
examinations at the Administration Building, 
Ancon, on Wednesday, October S, 1913, be- 
ginning promptly at 2 p. m., for persons de- 



siring to procure the following classes of 
licenses: Pilots, masters, mates, marine en- 
gineers, chauffeurs, and navigators of motor 
boats. All applicants for licenses must pro- 
cure from the E.xecutive Office, Ancon, form 
of application and information respecting 
the filling out of same, at least one day before 
the examination. Applicants for chauffeurs' 
licenses must also bring automobiles. 



LABOR FORCE AND QUARTERS IN AUGUST. 



The force report for August 27 shows the actual working force of the Canal Commission to 
be 35,005; of the Panama railroad, 4,957, and of the contractors, 2,923, a total effective 
working force of 42,885 men, an increase of 401, as compared with the statement for July. 
The gold force on the Canal work, composed almost e.xclusively of white Americans, was 
4,087, a reduction of 86, as compared with the previous month. A statement of the Canal 
force by divisions, follows: 













SILVER EMPLOYES* 










1 

1 


t3 
1 

1 




Department or 


Artisans. 


European 
laborers. 


West Indian 
laborers. 


1 

a 

o 


DivisiOxV. 


la 

c 
o 


o5 

1 

9 


to 

g 

o 
9 


c 
o 

375 


m 

s 


3 






u 

o 


a 


c 
u 


10 cents. 
7 cents. 


Construction & 
Engineering 


4.615 
118 

69) 

4 


1,480 


4,126 


3.120 


797 


91 


441 


6.908 


3.C72 


260 


25.303 

118 

972 

3.797 

717 

7 

4 


3,110 

281 

341 

206 

49 

16 

84 


28,413 
399 








3 
216 

2 


3 

425 

2 


5 
602 

1 










8 
354 


311 
1.255 


2 
16 

21 


1,313 

4.003 

766 


Quartermaster's 


24 


3 




















23 


Examination of 


























88 






























Total 


6.977 


9 


9 


396 


1.910 


4.734 


3.144 


800 


91 


441 7,270 


4,63^!t299 


30.918 


4 087 


35.005 


Month previous. 


7.031 


13 


1! 


535 


: .<in'< 


4.^S2 


2.694 


50.'; 


555 


636 6.3?8 


4.87l't27t> 


29.657 


4.173 


33.830 



i. C. C. force, 33,830; Panama railroad force, 3.894; Panama railroad commissory forLe. 1.3S2; total 39,106. 
*A11 wages specified arc in gold, flncludes four at five cents. |lncludes one at five cents. 

The force report of the Department of Construction and Engineering, including the em- 
ployes of contractors, as of August 27, was, as follows: 















SILVER EMPLOYES* 








> 

2 
s2 


a 






Artisans. 


European 
laborers. 


West Indian 
laborers. 


2 


Division. 


§ 


9 


c 

1 


§ 


g 
o . 


2 
1 


S 

o 


2 

V 


1 


c 


2 

c 

s 


2 

c: 
S 

o 




2 
■o 

B 


Chief Engineer. 
Mechanical Div. 
Atlantic Div. . . 
Central Division 
U. S. Steel Prod- 


2,.' 69 

lis 

557 
964 


273 
43 
45 
14 


982 
123 
272 
102 


2.815 
392 
597 
322 


1.365 

29 

436 

1.290 


476 

i97 
124 


23 
'68 


22 

2 

6 

411 


4.745 

1.21> 

453 

492 


1,017 

253 

1,714 


tl27 
16 
19 
98 


14.715 
2.152 
2.S36 
5,600 

85 

20 

2,294 

25.303 


1.614 
719 
243 
534 

234 

3 

287 

3,110 


16,329 
2,S71 
3.079 
6,134 

319 


Clucaao House 




























23 


McClintic - Mar- 
shall Co 






















. 






2,581 








1 

n 


















1260 




Total 


4.615 


9 

1 ? 


375 
36^ 


1,480 


4.126 


3.12C 


797 
505 


91 

555 


441 
636 


6.908 
6.051 


3.072 


28.413 


Month previous 


4.63.>< 


l.=:flfi 


3.9R6 


2.6SC, 


3,544! 240 


24.726 


3.225 


27.951 



*A11 wages specified are in gold, flndudcs three at five cents. 

QUARTERS. 

A report of Commission quarters occupied on August 31, follows: 



Place. 


Gold. 


Europeans. 


West Indians. 




Men 


Women 


Chil- 
dren 


Men 


Wctnen 


Chil- 
dren 


Men 


Women 


Chil- 
dren 


Balboa 


'!86 

5<.)3 

MO 

IS 

?!! 

370 

805 

190 

X6 

614 

999 

51 

73 


36 

306 

229 

1 

73 

74 

147 

267 

99 

47 

201 

425 

12 

29 


44 

243 

162 

1 

92 

91 

160 

291 

13S 

46 

210 

486 

17 

29 


409 

6 

482 

214" 

305 

118 

424 

406 

37 

128 

1,000 

40 

86 

113' 






772 
864 
611' 
26+' 
251 
251 
331 
539 
243 
213 
765 
1.342'' 
311 
230 












6 
9 

11 

32 
103 
101 
152 
141 

50 

20 
229 










6 




3 
3 
3 
SO 
45 
25 
12 
20 


ii 

2 
11 
95 
SO 
4< 
17 
24 


12 


Pedro M iguel 


48 




148 


Culebra 


157 
240 




172 




70 




12 




363 


Toro Pent 


1 










2 


4 










ToLil 


5.576 


1,946 


2.010 


3,768 


161 


283 


7.019 


856 


1,232 







(1) Includes Sabanas police station, Tabo^a Island, Culebra Island, Palo Seco and Naos Island. (2) Includes 
74 Panamanians. (3) Inclrjtips nine Ekist Indians. (4) Includes 54 Panamanians. (5) Includes Colon Beach, 
ai^d Colon Hospital. (6i Iri.hides 41 E.ist Indians, *J Americin citizens and. 59 Panamanians. (7) Includes 23 
Asiatics. Gold force of contractors (included above), 31 families, and 481 bachelors. 



October 1, 1913. 



THE CANAL RECORD 



49 



CHANGE IN ORGANIZATION. 



Central Division to be Abolished — Work Appor- 
tioned Among Other Departments. 

The Central Division will be abolished 
at the close of business on Friday, October 
10, the date set for the blowing up of Gamboa 
dike. It was first organized on July 1, 1909, 
succeeding the Department of Excavation and 
Dredging, and was assigned the Canal terri- 
tory extending from the south toe of Gatun 
Dam to the north end of the lock site at Pedro 
Miguel, a distance along the axis of the Canal 
of 31.69 miles. It embraced the entire e.Ktent 
of the former Culebra and Chagres Divisions, 
which have since been known as the Culebra 
and Chagres sections of the Central Division. 
Its scope of operations also included the con- 
struction of the Naos Island breakwater, the 
clearing of timber from the channel in the lake 
section, and such municipal, sanitary, and 
building work as was included within its ter- 
ritorial limits. The Canal work was divided 
into five construction districts, and was placed 
in charge of Lieut. -Col. D. D. Gaillard, as divi- 
sion engineer, with the following assistants: 
Mr. Earl A. Bronk, chief clerk; Mr. Louis K. 
Rourke, assistant division engineer; Mr. 
A. S. Zinn, resident engineer; Mr. Mark W. 
Tenny, Mr. R. VV. Hebard, Mr. W. L. Thomp- 
son, and Mr. George H. Ruggles, assistant 
engineers. Of the division engineer's assistants 
at that time, only two, Messrs. Zinn and 
Tenny, are now connected with the organiza- 
tion. 

With the resignation of Mr. Rourke on May 
1, 1910, a reorganization of the work was 
effected. The position of assistant division 
engineer w-as abolished, and that of general 
superintendent of construction created. The 
five construction districts were consolidated 
into four, as follows: The Chagres River dis- 
trict, extending from Gatun to the Chagres 
River, at Gamboa; the Empire district, ex- 
tending from Gamboa to the Empire suspen- 
sion bridge; the Culebra district extending 
from the suspension bridge to the railroad 
crossing north of Pedro Miguel Locks, and the 
Pedro Miguel district embracing the excava- 
tion between the railroad crossing and the 
locks, the dumps south of Pedro Miguel, and 
the construction of the Naos Island break- 
w'ater. At the beginning of the dry season in 
1909, the clearing, grubbing, and burning of 
trees and brush in the Gatun Lake channel 
was begun, and a total of 950.4 acres was 
cleared up to June 30, 1910. 

On May 10, 1911, the engineering branch of 
the division was reorganized. Previous to this 
time, the field and office work had been han- 
dled by the resident engineer at Empire, with 
offices in chaige of assistant engineers at 
Las Cascadas and Paraiso. The two latter 
offices were abolished, and their work trans- 
ferred to the office of the resident engineer at 
Empire. Slides became troublesome during 
1910-11, but the movement at Cucaracha, 
with which both the French and the Ameri- 
cans have had to deal, ceased temporarily, the 
last steamshovel cut at this point having been 
made in the early part of June, 1911, on the 
permanent bcrm at the 95-foot level. The 
slide at Culebra began to assume a formidable 
aspect at this stage. Clearing in the Gatun 
Lake section, embracing a total area of about 
1,132 acres, was completed during the fiscal 
year 1910-11. 

During the fiscal year 1911-12, it was de- 



cided to continue the plan of decreasing the 
pressure on the Canal banks at all places 
where breaks were likely to occur, by remov- 
ing the material above, and this arrangement 
has continued without interruption until the 
present time. A board was appointed and 
submitted a report on the Naos Island break- 
water, which had been giving trouble for 
some time, due to the sliding of the bottom 
under pressure caused by the weight of stone 
dumped from the trestle. The board recom- 
mended the building of a double trestle, which 
permitted of dumping on either side, thereby 
spreading the fill, and the plan was carried out. 

The Chagres district of the division was 
abolished on August 19, 1912, and the title 
of it changed to the Relocation Dumps. On 
October 1, 1912, the Empire district was ex- 
tended from the Chagres River to Station 17- 
60 the Culebra district from Station 1760 to 
Pedro Miguel Locks, and the Pedro Miguel 
district was changed to comprise the Central 
Division tracks south from a point opposite 
the north face of the northeast wing wall of 
Pedro Miguel locks, and the Miraflores and 
Balboa dumps. On September 26, 1912, the 
Empire district was made to include the slide 
on the west bank at Culebra. On November 
16, 1912, the timekeeping of the Culebra and 
Empire districts was concentrated in the 
office of the division engineer, and on Janu- 
ary 15, 1913, the same action was taken with 
respect to the relocation dumps. On July 1, 
1912, the Empire shops, formerly under the 
division, and the Las Cascadas wrecking out- 
fit, were transferred to the Mechanical 
Division. 

The Naos Island dike, 3.29 miles long, con- 
tinued to give trouble during the fiscal year 
1912-13, and it has proved one of the most 
difficult pieces of engineering the division has 
had to contend with. Up to June 30, 1913, the 
trestle had been entirely completed, and filled 
with the exception of a stretch about 600 feet 
long. The settlement continued, and in one 
locality, the vertical movement was as much 
as 50 feet. Not a single foot of the trestle 
constructed during the past three years re- 
mains at present under the track for which 
it was intended, having moved to one side 
laterally as much as 100 feet. So large has 
been this movement that actual observations 
in recent months have shown that the quan- 
tity of stone required to complete the dike up 
to its present height was at least ten times the 
theoretical quantity which would have been 
required had the bottom been unyielding. The 
dike has nearly always slid out when the sur- 
face of the water is at the lowest elevation, at 
which time, the pressure on the bottom of the 
dike is maximum. 

The distribution of the work after the 
division is abolished is outlined in an official 
circular printed on another page cf this issue 
of The Can.\l Record. Lieut. -Col. Gaillard, 
division engineer, on account of ill health, 
was compelled to return to the United States 
on August 9, 1913. 

The total amount of explosives used in this 
territory since the beginning of work by 
the Americans is approximately 38,729,000 
pounds. 

The total amount of material removed from 
the territory of the Central Division from May 
4, 1904 until September 10, 1913, the date 
steamshovel operations were permanently 
suspended, including all accessory work, with 



the exception of sluicing back of Gold Hill, is, 
as follows: 



Fisc, yr. 
ending 
June 30 



Rock. 



1904 

1905 .... 
1906..., 

1907 

1908 

1909 

1910 

191! 

1912. . . 
191,!, . . , 
1913 (Ju 
ly&Aug.) 



24,024 
397,043 
764.327 
2.429,720 
5.383,160 
6,444,897 
4.630.425 
4.583,719 
2.799.665 
2,732,563 

394,272 



36.083 
344,601 
742.235 
3..'!38.294 
8.456.102 
12,622,880 
13.235,383 
13.968,925 
14,343,402 
10.098,099 



60,107 

741,644 

1.506.562 

5,768,014 

13.839.262 

19.067,777 

17.865,808 

18.552,644 

17.143.067 

12,830,662 



Pa- 
cent 
rock. 



60.03 
46.46 
49.27 
57.88 
61.10 
,66,29 
74.08 
75,29 
83,67 
78.80 



1,393.728 1.788,000 77.95 



Total.. 30.583.815 78.579,732 100,163,547 J72,98 



The yardace for September 1st to 10th inclusive, as 
sliown tjy car measliriment. was 136,627 cubiv yards. 

Of the above total, 105,743,176 cubic yards 
were removed from the Canal prism; 1,360,- 
673 cubic yards from the Obispo Diversion, 
while 271,698 cubic yards consisted of out- 
side work. 

Of the three great construction divisions 
organized on July 1, 1908 — Atlantic, Central, 
and Pacific — only one, the Atlantic remains 
in existence. The Pacific Division was 
abolished upon the resignation of Mr. S. B. 
Williamson, its division engineer, on January 

1, 1913. 

♦ 

PERSONAL. 



Lieut. -Col. Eugene T. Wilson returned 
from leave of absence on the United Fruit 
Company's steamer Abangarez, from New 
Orleans, on Thursday, September 25. 

Maj. James Postell Jervey, Corps of En- 
gineers, U. S. A., resident engineer in the At- 
lantic Division, has been transferred from the 
Canal Commission service, and, accompanied 
by his family, sailed for New York on the 
Cristobal on September 27. He arrived on 
the Isthmus on July 24, 1908, and was as- 
sistant engineer in the Atlantic Division until 
September 15 of that year. Upon the re- 
organization of that division, he was made 
resident engineer and placed in charge of the 
masonry construction of Gatun Locks, which 
is now completed. Major Jervey was gradu- 
ated from West Point, with a commission of 
second lieutenant. Corps of Engineers, on 
June 11, 1892, and attained his present rank 
of major on February 28, 1908. His army 
career includes service in the Philippines; 
from February to September, 1906, he was 
engineer of the Moro province, and from that 
time until July of the following year, he was 
both engineer and secretary. In addition to 
his other army duties, he has ser\-ed as in- 
structor of engineering at West Point, and at 
the Engineer School at Washington. On 
October 15, Major Jervey will relieve Major 
F. W. Altstaetter, Corps of Engineers, of 
duties on the Ohio River pertaining to the 
Wheeling district. 

Maj. George M. Hoffman, Corps of En- 
gineers, U. S. A., resident engineer in the 
Atlantic Division, with headquarters at Gatun, 
has been transferred from the Canal Com- 
mission service, and sailed for New York on 
the Panama on Monday, September 29. He 
arrived on the Isthmus on January 10, 1908, 
and was made assistant division engineer of 
the old Chagres Division. With the be- 
ginning of operations on Gatun Dam and 
Spillway, he was placed in charge of this 
work by Lieut.-Col. Sibert, and leaves with 
both projects practically completed. He 
was made resident engineer on August 1, 



50 



THE CANAL RECORD 



Vol. VII, No. 6. 



1910. Major Hoffman entered the United 
States Military Academy at West Point 
on June IS, 1892, and upon his graduation 
in 1896, was made a second lieutenant in 
the Corps of Engineers. He was promoted 
to First Lieutenant on July 5, 1898; to 
Captain on April 23, 1904, and to Major 
on December 3, 1909. He has been trans- 
ferred to the Mississippi River impiovement 
service, with headquarters at Rock Island, HI. 

Mr. Arthur Sessions, superintendent of 
transportation in the Central Division, has 
resigned, effective October IS. He has ac- 
cepted the position of general superintendenc 
of transportation for the Bocas Division of the 
United Fruit Company, with headquarters at 
Bocas del Toro, Panama. He came to the 
Isthmu^onMay 10, 1905, enteiing the service 
of the Canal Commission as trainmaster. He 
was appointed assistant superintendent of 
transportation in the old Culebra division on 
July 1, 1905, and was promoted to his present 
position on AugUot 22, 1908. 

Judge H. A. Gudger sailed for New York on 
the Panama, on Monday, September 29, on 
his annual leave of absence. 

Gov. O. B. Colquit, Mrs. Colquit, and Miss 
Mary C. Colquit of Austin Tex.; Mr. and 
Mrs. J. N. Graves of Oklahoma City, Okla.; 
Mr. and Mrs. J. H. Bonner, Miss Garland 
Bonner, and J. S. Bonner, Jr., of Houston, 
Te.\., and Mrs. VV. E. Fitzgerald of Austin, 
were members of a party that arrived fi'om 
New Orleans on the Parismina on Monday, 
September 29, on a sightseeing trip to the 
Canal. 



COMMISSION CLUBHOUSES. 



Falling Off in Immigration. 

According to the figures of the quarantine 
service the number of steamship passengers, 
who embarked at Colon for foreign ports 
during August, was greatly in excess of the 
number who landed; the total was 4,267, con- 
sisting of 1,935 cabin, and 2,332 steerage pas- 
sengers. The number of persons who landed 
from foreign ports was 2,403, consisting of 
1,189 cabin, and 1,214 steerage passengers. 
The number of persons who embarked over 
those who landed was 1,860, The immigra- 
tion from the West India islands consisted of 
135 cabin, and 858 steerage passengers. This 
is a falling off of 665 in the number of steerage 
passengers, as compared with the month of 
July, and shows that tne information, which 
was recently disseminated throughout the 
islands to the effect that no more employment 
with the Isthmian Canal Commission is to be 
had, has been of benefit. Apart from the 
West Indies, the country sending the most 
steerage passengers to the Isthmus of late is 
Colombia. The number of steerage passen- 
gers from Colombian ports in August was 103, 
as compared with 139 in July. There were 
only 53 steerage passengers from Europe 
during the entire month. The number of per- 
sons arriving "in transit," practically all 
tourists, was 2,407, as compared with 2,306 
in July, an increase of 101. 

The number of persons who landed at the 
ports of Panama and Ancon during the 
month from foreign ports was 5 70. consisting of 
453 cabin, and 117 steerage passengers. The 
number of persons who embarked for foreign 
porta was 554, consisting of 382 cabin, and 
172 steerage passengers. The number who 
landed over those who embarked was 16. 
The net emigration from the Isthmus during 
August was 1,844. 



Aetlvttles of the YoAng Men*8 Christian Associa- 
tion. 

GENERAL. 

The moving picture schedule for the week October 
6 to U, is, as follows: Monday, Cristobal; Tuesday, 
Empire; Wednesday, Corozal; Thursday, Gatun; 
Friday. Culebra and Porto Bello. 

On September 28, a meeting of the representatives 
of the Y. M. C. A. chess clubs was held at the Cristobal 
clubhouse, when it was decided to hold an all-Isthmian 
chess tournament, to begin on Saturday, October 4, 
Rules and regulations for the tournament were adopted 
and forwarded to the various clubhouses. 

Through special arrangement with Mr. R. A. Linton, 
who has secured sole right to exhibit Tiios. A, Edison's 
recent!,v invented kinetophone (talking moving pic- 
tures), in several South American countries, these pic- 
tures are being exhibited at the Zone clubhouses during 
the current week. This is the hrst time that talking 
moving pictures have been exhibited on the Zone. 

COROZAL. 

Corozal defeated Gatun at basketball on Saturday 
evening, September 27, by a score of 15 to M. 

There was a large attendance at the "Smoker" held 
on Thursday evening. September 25. The program 
consisted of a baritone solo by Mr. Case; selections 
by the Tenth Infantry orchestra; violin solos by Mr. 
Whitehead; blackboard sketches by."Stcve;" recital 
of an Irish poem by "Dick" Roberts; the "Canal dig- 
ger's dream," by Mr. Biedermann; moving pictures; 
and two wrestling matches, one between Messrs. 
Howe and Grimm, won by Howe; in two minutes; 
and tlie other, between Christy and MartinofC, resulting 
in a draw after 10 minutes work. Cigars and refresh- 
ments were served. 

Edison's invention, the kinetophone. or talking 
moving picture machine, will be at the clubhouse on 
Friday night of this week. 

The Culebra basketball team is scheduled to play 
the Corozal team on Thursday night, October 2. 

Culebra won three games in bowhng from the Corozal 
players on Saturday evening, September 27. 

CULEBRA. 

The concert given by the Tenth Infantry band on 
Sunday evening was attended by over 300 people. 

For the benefit of those who were unable to attend 
the Iirst entertainment. Mr. D. V. Stratton repeated 
his lecture on the Sacramento Valley and the Panama- 
Pacihc Exposition, illustrated by slides and moving 
pictures, on Monday pight, September 29. 

The regular moving picture show will be given Fri- 
day night, October 3. instead of Thursday night. 

The Sunday night song service wiU be held on October 
5, at 7.30 p. m. All are invited to attend. 

EMPIRE. 

Four games of basketball were played in the local 
league during the past week, at the close of which the 
league standing was, as fellows : 

Won. Lost. 

Reds 3 1 

Blues 3 .... 1 

Whites 2 2 

Greens . , . , 4 

The opening game for Empire in the Isthmian basket- 
ball league will be played at Cristobal. 

The Empire tenpin bowling team defeated the Camp 
Elliott team three games on Tuesday evening, Sep- 
tember 23. on the Empire alleys. 

The opening game of the Isthmian tenpin bowling 
tournament will be between Empire and Camp Elliott, 
at Empire, on Saturday evening. October 4. 

About 50 new books have been added to the library, 
and can be drawn. 

A public debate will be held on Friday evening. Oc- 
tober 3. to which all are invited to attend. Subject, 
"Resolved, that the United States should take military 
steps to pacify Mexico." Speakers for the affirmative 
will be Messrs. F. G. Swanson and W. F. Morrison; 
for the negative, Messrs. J. H. Beckmeyer and W. H. 
Dougherty. Mr. Watson will be chairman of the meet- 
ing, and Mr. Barrett, secretary. 

GATt/N. 

President Brown extends a cordial invitation to all 
members of the Y. M. C. A. to Join in the local chess 
club. In addition to the local tournament. Gatun will 
be represented in the interassociation chess tournament. 

The standing of the local tournament on Saturday 
evening, September 27, was. as follows: 

Name. Won. Lost. P. C. 

Logan 5 1.000 

Marquand 8 2 800 

Farley 1 1 500 

Byrne 2 3 400 

Brown 2 .... 4 333 

Carson 2 6 250 

Fiege 1 000 

Dashiell 3 000 

H. E. Dewey of Gatun has accepted the challenge 



of Chas. Wehmaler of Cristobal for a series of two 
matches of 150 balls each, to decide the pool champion- 
ehip of the Isthmus. The' first match was played at 
Gatun on Tuesday evening, September 23, and re- 
sulted in a victory for Mr. Dewey, the score being 161 
to 139. The second match to complete the 300 balls 
will be played at Cristobal in the near future. 

The standing of the "Popular" handicap pool tourna- 
ment on Saturday evening, September 27 was, as follows: 
Name. Won. Lost. P. C. 

Dewey 8 1.000 

Pettitt 4 1 800 

Townsley 3 .... 1 750 

^'on 5 3 625 

Bailey 4 3 571 

Kerruish 3 .... 3 500 

Johnson 1 .... 1 500 

Gray 3 4 .... .450 

OTiara 2 3 400 

Bradley 2 6 250 

Rcisner 1 .... 4 200 

Dennis .... 3 000 

Wall 4 000 

Mrs. J. J. Walsh holds the duckpin record for ladies, 
having scored 136 during the month of September. 

The following have joined the Gatun Y. M. C. A. 
orchestra: Mess.''s. McNeeley, Giddings, Fatland, 
Sinith. Whiston, and Lutz. Mr. and Mrs. D. R. Walker, 
and Mrs. McLeod. Others are welcome to join at any 
time. 

CRISTOBAL. 

A concert was given by the string orchestra of the 
steamship Prinz Aiigusi Wilhdm. on Tuesday night, 
September 23. Gatun defeated Cristobal the same 
night at basketball; score 19 to 8. 

"President Woodrow Wilson's Mexican policy" will 
be considered by Messrs. Hipp and Daly at the dis- 
cussion club meeting on October 9. On the following 
Thursday night. Dr. C. C. Pierce, superintendent of 
Colon Hospital, will speak on "Sex hygiene," The 
public is invited to attend these meetings. 

Members of the boys' department made the trip 
to Gatun Friday afternoon, September 26. to witness 
the passage of the first boat through the locks. 

In a closely contested game, the Marines defeated 
the Cristobal team at basketball on Saturday night. 
September 27, by a score of 22 to 20. 

On Saturday night. September 27. the Cristobal team 
took two out of three games at tenpins from Gat un by 
the following scores: 

Gtitun. Cristobal. 

O'Meara... 168 130 162 Barrett 130 143 171 

Wall 187 208 145 Buser 181 155 180 

Sherrard... 155 166 178 Collins 162 171 158 

McCalley... 167 158 118 Russell 161 176 167 

Humphreys. 187 179 198 Builard 171 201 170 



Totals.... 864 841 801 805 846 846 

The opening games in the annual Isthmian tenpin 
league will be rolled on Saturday night. October 4. 
The members of the Cristobal team that will contend 
for the championship of the Isthmus in interassociation 
bowling for what will probably be che last time will 
be. as follows: J. W. Barrett, W. F. Barnum, H. C. 
Collins. Geo. Barte. C. M. Builard. and W. G. H. 
Russell. The Cristobal association won the champion- 
ship in 1907. and since that year the Empire association 
has won each series. Mr. Barte was a member of the 
Cristobal team in 1907. but for the past three years 
has been bowling with Gatun. Messrs. Barrett. Collins, 
and Builard will enter on the fifth year as members 
of this team. Messrs. Barnum and Russell are new 
members of the team. 



Misdirected Letters. 

The following insufficiently addressed letters, origi- 
nating in the United States and its possessions, have 
been received in the office of the Director of Posts, and 
may be procured upon request of the addressees:: 



Abello. U. D. 
Arner, Otto 
Barnes, Walter 
Berntson, Bernt 
Caley. R. D. 
Campbell. O. F. 
Cody. T. A. 
Conger, Stanley E. 
Dean, Miss Jazrine 
Demuth, E. 
DeLong. Chas. 
Durscnberry, Claud 
Fowle, Jno. 
Freedman, Sam D. 
Fridley, E. S. 
Guilford. Frank B. 
Hall. Fred P. 
Hernandez, Lus 
Horn. M. E. 
Januarj'. Mrs. C. L. 
Jensen, J. C. 
Judge, Thomas F. 
Keough, John M. 



(4J 



Rett. David 
Lenow, Francis J. 
Love, W. J. A. 
Malmo, Robert H. 
Masque, J. M. 
McCullock, A. 
McHenrj-, Paul 
McLean. Miss Annie (2) 
Neverson, C. T. 
Ponsaint. H. 
Robertson, Walter 
Robinson, L. W. 
Rocky. Mrs. Ruth 
Ridge, Steve 
Sandiford, Evans 
Schott, U. E. 
Seaver. Horace 
Tripp, B. A. 

Twitchell, Miss Elizabeth 
Walsh, E. L. 
Walrond. Mrs. E. D. 
Ward, Geo. B. 
WUliams, P. 



October 1, 1913. 



THE CANAL RECORD 



51 



OFFICIAL CIRCULARS. 



Central Division Abolished. 

CuLEBRA. C. Z., September 27, 1913. 
Circular No. 183-z-l. 

Effective October 1, 1913. the timekeeping and cost- 
keeping for the Central Division and the costkeeping 
for the Quartermasters Department will be transferred 
to the Chairman and Chief Engineer's Office, together 
with the personnel necessary to take care of the work. 

Effective at the close of business October 10. 1913. 
the Central Division \\\\\ be abolished. The following 
changes in organization will be made, effective October 
11. 1913: 

All surveying work will be transferred to Mr. W. G. 
Comber, resident engineer. Sixth Division, under 
whose supervision excavation in the wetted prism will 
be completed by dredging. 

Transportation forces will be transferred to the 
Second Division of the Chief Engineers Office, under the 
super\'ision of the superintendent of transportation, 
who will also have supervisim of transportation in the 
First Division, the Fifth Division, and the transpor- 
tation forces of the Fortifications Division on tne Pacific 
side. 

The steamshovel and other construction work of the 
Central Division outside the wetted prism will be 
transferred to this office. Mr. A. S. Zinn. resident 
engineer, reporting to the Chief Engineer. The force 
under Mr.Zinn will be carried on the rolls of tins office. 

The property accountability, now carried by the 
Central Division, will be transferred to the office of the 
Chief Quartermaster, where it will be maintained for 
account of this office. The Chief Quartermaster will 
issue the necessary instructions to consummate the 
transfer and see that proper memorandum receipts 
are secured. 

Transfers of force will be authorized as soon as the 
several new organizations are approved and employes 
to be retained determined. 

Geo. W. Goethals. 
Chairman and Chief Engineer. 



Issuance of Commissary Coupon Books. 

CuLEBRA, C. Z.. September 26, 1913. 
Circular No. 256-M: 

Effective October 10, 1913, the following instructions 
relative to issuing coupon books will bs observed by all 
concerned : 

1. No S2.50 commissary books will be issued. Issues 
will be limited to S5 and $15 books. (The S2.50 books 
on hand will be used up by issuing to silver employes two 
books on each S5 request until the stock is exhausted.) 

2. Gold employes are instructed to use the facilities 
provided for purchasing books for cash, wherev'er 
practicable. 

3. Employes who cannot supply themselves with 
books by purchase for cash are directed to order, be- 
tween the 10th and 25th of each month, sufficient books 
to last one month, unless they expect to sooner leave 
the service. 

4. Requests for books received before the 10th or 
after the 25th of the month will be honored for new 
employes, or in the case of an unforeseen emergency. 
Foreman or other officials who approve requests for cou- 
pon books will bs held responsible for the proper ob- 
servance of this rule. 

5. All employes are instructed to submit no requests 
for coupon books to be issued against pay roll deduc- 
tions prior to the day on which an amount sufficient to 
cover the total value of all the books ordered shall have 
been earned. Meal tickets issued must be charged 
against the amount earned before coupon books can be 
issued. 

6. Requests for books must in all cases be fully and 
carefully filled out. The form of request has been re- 
vised (new No. C. E. 145-2) . The revised form will be 
used exclusively after October 10. The old forms will be 
destroyed. 

7. Foremen and others whose duty it is to approve 
and forward employes' requests for books will prompt- 
ly forward them to the time offices daily, if the requests 
are in order. 

8. Books will be delivered by the timekeeping office 
within two days after the request is made, or the em- 
ploye will be notified of the reason for nonissuance. 
Failure to receive an acknowledgment of a request 
within two days should be reported immediately in 
writing to the Chief Clerk, Chairman's Office. Culebra, 
with a duplicate of the request. 

Geo. W. Goethals. 
Chairman and Chief Engineer. 



Shipments of Employes* Household Goods Out 
of New York. 
Culebra, C. Z.. September 29, 1913. 
ClttCULAR No. 186-G. 

The attention of employes is directed to the fact that 
on shipments of household goods to the States the 



railroads running out of New York City require that 
freight charges must be prepaid and that shipments 
must be forwarded in cases, not trunks. If the goods 
are shipped in trunks, the trunks must be crated. It 
would, therefore, be advisable for employes to ship 
household goods by the steamer preceding the one on 
which they take passage, in order that arrangements 
may be made to prepay charges when the employe 
arrives in New York City; otherwise, a delay may 
result or it may be necessary to forward the shipment 
by express, as this is the only \vay a shipment can be 
forwarded C. O. D. It is not possible to make arrange- 
ments to prepay all charges on the Isthmus when the 
shipment is destined for a point beyond New York 
City. Geo. W. Goethai<;. 

Chairman. 



Use of Hand Shovels. 
Culebra, C. Z., September 20, 1913. 
Heads of Departments and DrvisioNs: 

Until further notice, hand shovels on construction 
work shall be used, as follows: 

(1) For handling of earth; No. 2 ro'ind point, short 
handle, malleable iron "D" handle shovel. 

(2) For general railroad construction and ordinary 
tamping in connection therewith; No. 2 round point, 
short handle shovel. 

(3) For railroad maintenance work; No. 2 square 
point, short handle shove! for tamping, and No 2. 
round point, short handle shovel for ditching, weed cut- 
ting, etc. 

(4) For shoveling concrete material from boards, in- 
cluding sand, gravel, and broken stone; No. 2 square 
point, short handle shovel. 

(5) For mixing and placing concrete; No. 2 square 
point, short handle shovel. 

(6) No. 2 long handle, square point and round point 
shovels, respectively, shall be used whenever material 
is to be raised to such an elevation as will render their 
use economical. Geo. W. Goethals, 

Chairman and Chief Engineer. 



Termination of Service Papers. 

Culebra. C. Z.. September 24. 1913. 
Heads of Depart.ments and Divisions: 

In addition to termination of service papers, Form 
171-1 C. E., at present being forwarded to this office, 
it is directed that an extra copy be sent direct to the 
superintendent of Ancon and Colon Hospitals. 

It is also directed that these termination papers be 
prepared and forwarded as soon as possible after an 
employe has tendered his resignation, or his services 
are otherwise terminated. 

Geo. W. Goethals. 
Chairman and Chief Engineer. 



Acting Purchasing Agent. 

Culebra, C. Z., September 5, 1913. 
CIRCUL.A.R No. 501: 

Effective September 6. 1913, and during the absence 
on leave of Capt. Courtland Nixon. Mr. Charles L. 
Parker, assistant depot quartermaster, will perform 
the duties of purchasing .?.gent on the Isthmus. 
Geo. W. Goethals, 

Chairman. 



Acting Depot Ouartermaster. 

Office of Chief Quartermaster, 

Culebra. C. Z., September 12, 1913. 
Effective September 6, and during the absence on 
leave of Capt. Courtland Nixon, Mr. Charles L. Parker 
will act as depot quartermaster. He is authorized to 
receive and receipt for supplies for the Isthmian Canal 
Commission consigned to Capt. R. E. Wood, or the 
Chief Quartermaster. Isthmian Canal Commission, to 
accomplish bills of lading, to certify invoices for 
payment as to quantity and quality of supplies shown 
on such invoices; and. in general, to perform such duties 
as properly belong to the position of depot quarter- 
master. R. E. Wood. 

Chief Q:iart€rmaslfT. 



Change in Circular Number. 

Panama Railroad Company. 
Office of General Superintendent. 

Colon. R. F.. September 24. 1913. 
Circular No. 216: 

All Con-erned — Referring to my circular No. 102. 

dated September 20. appointing Mr. F. B. Clements 

as local auditor of the Panama Railroad Company: 

Please change this circular number to read 206, 

instead of 102. 

John D. PAncasoN, 
General Super intendinl. 



Married. 

EBDON-ASHTON — On September 20, at the home 
of Mr. and Mrs. William Ashton. Mount Hope. Canal 
Zone, Emma E. Ashton of Calumet. Mich., to Thomas 



J. Ebdon of Houston. Tex.. Rev. C. O. Purdy officia- 
ting. Canal Zone residence. Gatun. 

WHITE-FROST— At the residence of the bride's 
mother. Cristobal, on Thursday. September \», 1913, 
Miss OJina J. L. Frost of Caracas. Venezuela, to Mr. 
Walter Joseph White of Covina. Cal., the Rev. 
Father Henry Pouget officiating. 

JENSEN-WESTLEY— In the Union Church. Cris- 
tobal, on September 22. Miss Blanche Myrtle Westley 
of Altoona, Pa., to Mr. John Christian Jensen of 
Alexandria. Va., the Rev. Carl H. Elliott officiating. 
Residence, Porto Bello. 

CAMPEY-HAWKINS— On September 29. in the 
Union Church. Cristobal. Mary Elizabeth Hawkins 
of Houston, Texas to George Miles Campev of Detroit. 
Mich., the Rev. Carl H. Elliott officiating. Canal 
Zone residence. Cristobal. 



Rainfall, Sept. 1 to Sept. 27, 1913 


, Inclu 


sive. 


Stations. 


.5 

il 

'fl o 

2 






Pacific Section — 

Ancon 


Ins. 
1.88 
1.86 
1.42 
1.18 
1.73 

1.93 
2.24 
1.23 
1.27 
2.15 
1.22 
1.3.S 
2.22 
3.26 

1 46 
1.49 
1.54 
3.25 


19 

8 
23 
24 
19 

8 
9 
8 

19 
6 
3 

19 
5 
5 

23 

18 

8 

19 


Ins. 
7 49 


Balboa 


6 55 


♦MirafJores 


7 87 






Rin GmnHp 


8 54 


Central Section — 

Culebra 




*Camacho 


6 38 


Empire 


8 74 




8 38 


*JuanMina 


7 82 


Alhajuela 

*E1 Vigia 


6.94 
6 84 


•Frijoles 


10 3S 


*Monte Lirio 


12 32 


Atlantic Section — 




*Bra2os Brook 


9 33 




7 81 


1 Porto Bello 


10 22 







■'Standard rain gage — readings at 5 p.m., daily. 
Automatic rain gage at unstarred stations — values 
midnight to midnight. fTo 5 p.m., September 26. 



Stages of the Chagres. 

Maximum height of the Chagres River for the week 
ending midnight, Saturday, September 27, 1913. All 
heights are in feet above mean sealevel. 



Stations. 



Day and Date. 



Vigia. 



Sun., September 21 131.5 

Mon., September 22 j 130.0 

Taes., September 23 i 127.2 

Wed., September 24 I 127.6 

Thurs.. September 25..' 126.9 

Fri., September 26 ( 126-6 

Sat., September 27.... 126,6 



Height of low water to 
rjcarest foot i 125.0 



96.4 
96.2 
93.; 
93.8 
93.4 
93.0 
92.8 



64.8 
65.0 



91.0 i 44 



61 



64.7 
64.9 
65 1 
65.3 
65.3 
65..'! 
65.6 



*Sluice sates in spillway at Gatun were closed on 
June 27, 1913, with surfare of lake at elevation 48.25, 



Tide Table. 

The following table 5h:)ws the time ot hii,h and low 
tide at Panama for week ending Septeml)er 13, 1SJ13; 



Date. 


High 


Low 


High 


Low 


High 


Ort. 5 

O t. 6 


A.M. 


A.M. 
12 55 
1.41 
2.40 
3 49 
S 08 
o 25 

7.27 


A.M. 
6.53 
7.41 
8.38 
9.52 

11.24 
P. M. 

12.47 
1 47 


P.M. 

1.18 
2.11 
3.12 

4 25 

5 41 

6 47 

7.43 


P.M. 
7 26 
8.22 


Ot 7 . 




9 30 


O-t. 8 

O^t. 9 




10.53 


Oct. 10 

Oct. U 


12.18 
1.20 





7Sth meridian time. 



Aacon Crusher. 

Ancon crusher operations for week ending Septem- 
ber 27: 



Cubic 
^■ard^. 



Sept. 22. 
Sept. 23. 
Sept. 24. 
Sept. 25. 
Sept. 26. 
Sept. 27. 

Total.. 



1.842 
2.197 
1.S36 
2,004 
1.903 
1.844 



11.626 



Hours 
worked. 



45.00 



52 



THE CANAL RECORD 



Vol. VII, No. 6. 



COMMISSARY DEPARTMENT. 



The commissary stores are open during the fol- 
lowing hours: 

Cri.stobal, 8 a. ra., to 12.30 p. m.. and 2 to 7 p. m. 

Balboa. 8 a. m. to 12.30 p. m.. and 2.30 lo 7 p. m. 

Ancon. 8 a. m. to 1 p. m.. and 3 to 6 p.m. 

All other.', S a. ra. to 1 p. m., and ?> to 7 p. m. 

Retail prices of cold storage provisions for the week 
beginning October 1. IPH: 

FRESH MEATS. 

Mutton — Stewing, per pound 

Shoulder, neck trimmed off (4 pounds 

and over) , per pound 

Entire, forequarter (not trimmed, 10 

pounds and over) , per pound 

Legs (8 to 10 pounds), per pound. . . . 

Cutlets, per pound 

Short cut chops, per pound 

Lamb — Stewing, per pound 

Entire forequarter, neck trimmed off. 

per pound 

Legs (5 to 8 pounds), per pound 

Chops, per pound 

Cutlets, per pound 

\'eal — Stewing, per pound 

Shoulder, for roasting (not under 4 

pounds) , per pound 

Chops, shoulder, per pound 

Chops, per pound 

Loin, for roasting per pound 

Cutlets, per pound 

Beef — Suet, per pound 

Soup, per pound 

Stew, per pound 

Plate, per pound 

Corned. Xo. 1, per pound 

Corned, No. 2, per pound 

Chuck roast, 3 lbs., and over, per pound , 
Rib roaat. second cut (not under 3^ 

pounds), per pound 

Rib roast, first cut (not under 3 pounds), 

per pound ., 

Pot roast, per pound 

Rump roast, per pound 

Porterhouse roast, per pound 

Steak, Chuck, per pound 

Round, per pound 

Rib. per pound 

Sirloin, per pound 

Rump, per pound 

Porterhouse (not less than 1 \ 

pounds), per pound 

Tenderloin (Western), per pound. 

Pork — Loin chops or roast, per pound 

Hams, fresh, per pound 

Shoulders, fresh, per pound 

Spare ribs, per pound 

Backbones, per pound 

Pigs' feet, each 

Pigs' head. J-head 

Sausage, home made, per pound 

MISCELLANEOUS. 

Livers — Beef, per pound 

Calf, each 

Half, each 

Steak, Hamburger, package 

Sausage — Bologna, per pound 

Frankfurter, per pound 

Lieberwurst. per pound 

Devonshire Farm, per pound 

Sweetbread, beef, per pound 

Eggs, fresh, per dozen t36 

per 5-dozen tl8 

Bluefish. per pound 

Halibut, fresh, per pound 

Salmon, per pound 

Roe shad , each 

Shad roes, pair 

POULTRY jVXn GAME. 

Chickens — Fancy roasting, milk fed. large, each. . 
Fancy roasting, mild'fed,med.,each. . 
Fancy roasting, corn fed, about SJ 

pounds, each 1 . 25 

Fancy roasting, corn fed, about 4f 

pounds, each 1 .00 

Fowls, each tt60. 70. 80. 90, and 1 .00 

Ducks, Western (about \\ pounds), each 1 .25 

Capons, each 2.00 



Price. 
6 



17 

18 

20 

6 

9 
20 
24 
24 
10 

12J 

17 

26 

26 

30 



9 
14 
12 
12 

16 

18 

19 

19 

20 

12i 

13 

18 

19 

19 

20 
30 
17 

no 

§17 
15 
IS 
7 
60 
20 

11 
60 
30 
13 
13 
13 
13 
20 
34 



12 
15 
15 
75 
40 

1.40 
1.10 



Broilers, milk fed, each. 
Broilers, corn fed, each. 

Turkeys, per pound 

Squabs, each 

Rabbits, skinned, each. . 
Partridges, pair. 



70 
60 
28 
50 
30 
30 



Grouse, per pair 1 . 30 

Pheasants 1 . 30 

CURED AND PICKLED MEATS. 

Ham — Genuine Westphalia, per pound 40 

Ham — -Sugar cured, per pound 20 

Sliced, per pound 22 

Half, for boiling, per pound 21 

Boiled, per pound 28 

Hocks, per pound {8 

Beef, salt, family, per pound 12 

Bacon — Breakfast, whole piece, per pound 25 

Sliced, per pound 26 

Ham, lunch, per pound. 32 

Pork. salt, family, per pound 14 

Ox tongues, each 1 .00 

Piga" feet, per pound *7 

Tongues, per pound 18 

DAIRY PRODUCTS. 

Butter — Creamery, special, per pound t36 

Sheifield Farms, extra fancy, per lb 46 

Cheese — Philadelphia cream, cake 10 



Price, 

Cheese — Roquefort, per pound 35 

Voung America, per pound 22 

Swiss, per pound 28 

Edam . each 1 . 00 

Edam, tin 25 

Parmesan, per pound 35 

Gouda. per pound 30 

Snappy, per cake 10 

Milk (certified), per quart **.20 

Fer-mil-Iac. bottle **.20 

Ice cream, quart t25 

i-gallon J50 

VEGETABLES AND FRUITS. 

Beets, per pound 3 

Celery, per head 6 

Cabbage, per pound 3| 

Cucumbers, per pound 4 

Carrots, per pound 4 

Egg plant, per pound 4 

Lettuce, per pound v . . . . 14 

Onions, per pound 3 

Potatoes, white, per pound 3 

sweet, per pound 2 

Parsley, btmch 5 

Peppers, green, per pound 4 

Romaine. per pound 14 

Squash, per pound 3 

Turnips, per pound 4 

Tomatoes, per pound 5 

Vams, ppi pound 3 

Canteloupes. each 7 

Grapes, Malaga and Tola,y. per pound *12 

Niagara and Delaware, per pound. ... 8 

Grape fruic, each 4 

American, each 15 

Lemons, per dozen 24 

l.imes. per hundred SO 

Peaches, per pound ^9 

Plums 10 

Pears, per pound *7 

Oranges. Jamaican, per dozen 18 

Watermelons, each 40 

♦Indicates reduction from last list. 

**Indicates 5 cents allowed for return of tottle. 

tindicates advance on lust list. 

tfFowls weigh each, about as follows: 3. 3J, 4, 4^, 
and 5 pounds. Prices are based accordingly; when 
size ordered is not in stock, next lightest weight is 
sujiplied and refund note sent for difference. 

tSold only from commissaries; no orders taken for 
delivery. 

^Not less than half of a fresh ham or shoulder will be 
sold. 



MOVEMENT OF OCEAN VESSELS- 



Supplies for the Canal. 

The following steamers with supplies for the Isth- 
mian Canal Commission and Panama Railroad Com- 
pany, arrived at the ports of Colon and Cristobal, dur- 
ing the week ending September 20: 

Paslores, September 14, from New York, with 760 
bags oats, for stock; 762 pieces structural material, for 
Mechanical Division; 21 reels wire cable, for First 
Division; 76 pieces furnace material, for Second Divi- 
sion; 24 bales rubber hose, for stock. 

Sixaola. September 15. from New Orleans, with 3.293 
sacks creosoted blocks, for Mechanical Division; 63 
bundles cypress shingles, for stock; 2,795 pieces lumber, 
for stock and Mechanical Division; 432 bales hay. 25 
push cars, for stock. 

Carl Schtirz. September 15, from New York, with 100 
cases soap, for stock; 886 pieces furnace material, for 
Mechp.nical Division; 348 pieces pipe, 36 cases brushes, 
for stock. 

Adva7tci\ September 16, from New York, with 80 
crates roofing tile, for First Division: 32 cases toe 
calks, 50 reels sash cord, for stock; 28 reels wire cloth, 
for First Division; 75 cases lanterns, 167 cases candles, 
for stock; 4.570 pieces building tile, for Second Division; 
103 cases oil, 40 rolls cotton duck. 72 kegs horseshoes, 
for stock; 86 bundles wire, for First Division; 49 drums 
unslacked lime, for stock; 42 pieces structural material, 
for fortifications; 24 bundles pipe-fittings, 50 cases 
paint, 15 bales harness leather. 50 kegs nails, for stock; 
one case medical supplies, for medical depot; and a 
miscellaneous cargo, the whole consisting of 5,859 
pieces, weighing 168 tons. 

Cristobal, September 17. from New York, with 110.- 
981 bafes cement, for stock; 289 pieces pipe, for various 
departments; 188 bundles steel bars, for Panama Rail- 
road Company; 40 reels copper cable, for First Divi- 
sion; 160 kegs red lead, for emergency dams, and a 
miscellaneous cargo, total weight 5.825 tons. 

Meiapan. September 17, from New York, witli /44 
bags oats, 22 cases brass valves, for stock; four boxes 
pipe-fittings, for Mechanical Division. 

Turrialba. September 18. from New- Orleans, with 
1,649 sacks creosoted blocks, for Second Division; 65 
barrels brake shoes, for Mechanical Division; 922 
bales hay. 2.009 pieces lumber, for stock. 



The following is a list of sailings of the Panama 
Railroad Steamship Company; of the Royal Mail 
Steam Packet Company; of the Hamburg -.American 
Line, and of the United Fruit Company's Line. 

NEW YORK TO CRISTOBAL.* 



Colon 


...P. R. R. 


.Saturday. . . 


.Sept. 


27 


Advance 


. . . P. R. R. 


.Saturday. . 


.Oct. 


4 


Panama 


. . . P. R. R. 


.Friday 


.Oct. 


10 


Allianca 


...P. R. R. 


-Thursday.. . 


-Oct. 


16 


Colon 


. . P. R. R. 


.Wednesday. 


.Oct. 


22 


Advance 


. . . P. R. R. 


.Tuesday.. . . 


.Oct. 


28 


Panama 


...P. R. R. 


• Monday 


.Nov. 


3 


Allianca 


...P. R. R. 


.Monday. . . 


.Nov. 


10 


Colon 


...P. R. R. 


.Monday 


.Nov. 


17 


Advance 


. . . P. R. R. 


. Saturday . . . 


.Nov. 


22 


Panama 


...P. R. R. 


.Saturday. . . 


.Nov. 


29 


Allianca 


...P. R. R. 


. Friday 


-Dec. 


S 


CRISTOBAL TO NEW YORK.* 






Allianca 


...P. R. R. 


Saturday. . . 


.Oct. 


4 


Colon 


...P. R. R. 


.Thursday.. . 


.Oct. 


9 


Advance 


...P. R. R. 


-Thursday.. 


.Oct. 


16 


Panama 


. . . P. R. R. 


. Wednesday . 


.Oct. 


22 


Allianca 


. . . P. R. R. 


.Tuesday 


.Oct. 


28 


Colon 


. . . P. R. R. 


Tuesday. ... 


.Nov. 


4 


Advance 


...P. R. R. 


Sunday 


.Nov. 


9 


Panama. . 


. . . P. R. R. 


-Sunday 


.Nov. 


16 


Allianca 


. . . P. R. R. 


-Saturday. . . 


.Nov. 


22 


Colon 


. . . P. R. R. 


Saturday. . . 


.Nov. 


29 


Advance 


. . . P. R. R. 


- Friday 


Dec. 


S 


NEW YORK TO COLON. 






Almirante 


...U.F. C. 


. Wednesday . 


.Sept. 


24 


Prinz Joachim. . .. 


...H.-A... 


.Saturday. . 


.Sept. 


27 


Carrillo 


...U.F. C. 


.Saturday. . 


.Sept. 


27 


Magdalena 


. . . R. M . . 


.Saturday. . 


.Sept. 


27 


Santa Marta 


. . . U. F. C. 


.Wednesday. 


.Oct. 


1 


CarlSchurz 


....H.-A... 


.Saturday. . 


.Oct. 


4 


Pastores 


...U. F. C. 


.Saturday. . . 


.Oct. 


4 


Metapan 


...U. F. C. 


- Wednesday 


.Oct. 


8 


Prinz August Wilhelm.H.-A. . . 


. Saturday . . 


.Oct. 


11 


Tivives 


...U.F. C. 


.Saturday. . 


.Oct. 


11 


Danube 


. . . R. M . . 


.Saturday. . . 


.Oct. 


11 


Zacapa 


...U.F.C. 


. Wednesday . 


.Oct. 


IS 


Emil L. Boas 


...H.-A.... 


.Saturday. . 


.Oct. 


18 


Tenadores 


...U.F.C. 


.Saturday. . 


.Oct. 


18 


Almirante 


...U.F.C 


- Wednesday 


.Oct. 


22 


Tagus 


...R. M... 


- Saturday - . 


.Oct. 


25 


Carrillo 


...U.F. C 


-Saturday. . 


-Oct. 


25 


COLON TO NEW 


YORK. 






Emil L. Boas. . . . 


...H.-A... 


-Tuesday,. . . 


.Oct. 


7 


Tenadores 


...U.F.C. 


Tuesday 


.Oct. 


7 


Almirante 


...U.F.C. 


Thursday. . . 


.Oct. 


9 


Prinz Joachim 


...H.-A... 


-Tuesday.. . . 


.Oct. 


14 


Carrillo 


...U.F.C. 


. Tuesday 


.Oct. 


14 


Tagus 


. . . R. M . . 


.Tuesday 


.Oct. 


14 


Santa Marta 


...U.F.C. 


Thursday.. , 


-Oct. 


16 


Pastores 


...U.F.C. 


Tuesday 


.Oct. 


21 


Carl Schurz 


...H.-A... 


.Tuesday . . . 


.Oct. 


21 


Metapan 


...U.F.C. 


.Thursday.. . 


.Oct. 


23 


Oruba 


...R. xM... 


-Tuesday.. . 


.Oct. 


28 


Tivives 


...U.F.C. 


Tuesday.. , . 


.Oct. 


28 


Prinz August Wilhe 


Ira. H.-A... 


Tuesday.. . . 


.Oct. 


28 


NEW OilLEANS TO COLON. 






Atenas 


...U.F.C. 


Saturday . , . 


.Sept. 


27 


Sixaola 


. . . . U. F. C. 


. Wednesday 


.Oct. 


1 




. . U. F. C. 


. Saturday . . . 
- Wednesday - 


.Oct. 
.Oct. 




Heredia 


...U.F.C. 


8 


Abangarez 


. . . U. F. C. 


Saturday- . . 


.Oct. 


11 


Parismina 


...U.F. C. 


. Wednesday 


.Oct. 


IS 


SLxaola 


...U.F.C. 


Saturday. . . 


.Oct. 


18 


Cartago 


...U.F.C. 


.Wednesday. 


.Oct. 


22 


COL 


3N TO NEW 


ORLEANS. 






Abangarez 


...U.F.C. 


Thursday... 


.Oct. 


2 


Parismina 


...U.F.C. 


Saturday. . . 


.Oct. 


4 


Atenas 


...U.F.C. 


Thursday.. . 


.Oct. 


9 


SLxaola 


...U.F. C. 


-Saturday- . . 


.Oct. 


U 


Turrialba 


...U.F.C. 


Thursday.. . 


.Oct. 


16 


Heredia 


...U.F.C. 


Saturday. . . 


.Oct. 


18 


Abangarez 


...U.F C. 


Thursday . . . 


.Oct. 


23 



Launch Service to Taboga. 

The steam launch Santdad leaves the dredge landing 
at Balboa at 9 o clock. Tuesday. Thursday, and Satur- 
day mornings. On the return trip it arrives at Balboa 
about 4. 30 p. m.. In time to make connection for the 
5.25 train ac Panama. 



♦Amended schedule, resulting from temporary with- 
drawal of the AlUajua for repairs. 

Panama Railroad Company's steamers sail from Pier 
11. Cristobal, at 3 p. m. 

Royal Mail steamers leave for New York on alter- 
nate Tuesdays at 1 p. m.; for Southampton on alter- 
nate Tuesdays at 10 a. m. 

United Fruit Company's ships for New Orleans 
direct, leave on Thursdays and Saturdays at 3 p. m.; 
ships for New York via Kingsto.i, ou Tuesdays at 1.30 
p. m. and Thursdays at l.^O p. ra.. for Bocas del Tore 
on Mondays at 5 p. m.; for Limou. via Bocas del 
Toro. on Tuesdays at 5 p. m.; and for Limon direct, 
Tuesdays at 3 p. m; 

Hamburg- American steamers sail for New York, via 
Kingston and Santiago de Cuba, on Tuesdays; the 
Prinz Joachim and Prinz August Wilheiiti at 10 a. m. 
and che£mt/ L. Boas and Carl Schurz at 2 p. m. 



CANAL 




RECORD 



Volume VII. 



ANCON, CANAL ZONE, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 8, 1913. 



No. 7. 



The Canal Record 

Published weekly under the authority and suPeriisioii of 
the Isthmian Canal Commission. 



The Canal Record is Published free of charge, one copy 
each to all employes of the Commission and Panama 
Railroad Company whose names are on the gold roll. 
Extra copies and back numbers can be obtained from the 
news stands of the Panama Railroad Company for five 
cents each. 



Address all ConiDaunications, 

THE CANAL RECORD. 

Ancon, Canal Zone, 

Isthmus of Panama. 

No communication either for publication or requesting 
information, will receive a'Jention unless signed with the 
full name and address oi the writer. 



NOTES OF PROGRESS. 



Destruction of Gamboa Dike. 

The dynamiting of Gamboa dike will take 
place at 9 a. m., on Friday, October 10. The 
drilling of holes was completed on Wednesday. 
October 8, and the work of loading them 
was begun the day before. Over 1,000 
holes, extending over every part of the barrier, 
have been drilled to an average depth of 35 
feet. Owing to the fact that the 24-inch dis- 
charge pipes leading from the lake into the 
Cut has been increased by two from the num- 
ber first planned, making six in all, the Cut 
between the dike and Cucaracha slide is filling 
rapidly, and it is estimated that by the morn- 
ing of the 10th, the water will be within about 
five feet of the lake level. On Tuesday, October 
7, the stage of water in the lake was 67.2 feet, 
and that in the Cut at 57.6 feet above sea- 
level. It is the present plan to ditch through 
the slide at Cucaracha on the day before the 
dike is destroyed. Work on the dredge land- 
ing and pontoon bridge approach at Paraiso 
has been advanced in anticipation of this 
event, and on Saturday night, the steam- 
shovels completed the work of excavatinglthe 
recess in the east bank of the Canal. It is 
necessary to build a concrete pier for the east 
bridge approach, and this work had reached 
the point on Tuesday where the concrete 
could be poured. This work is expected to be 
so far completed by Friday as to be entirely 
out of the way of the water when it enters 
this part of the channel. 



.Seismic Disturbances. 

.An earthquake shock, which, in intensity, 
has not been equallefl since the establishment 
of the Ancon seismograph station, occurred 
at 11.25 p. m., on Wednesday, October 1. 
The needles on the .Ancon seismograph were 
thrown off the paper, and the amplitude of the 
shock was only recorded to 75 millimeters. 
Its duration so far as the perceptibility of 
individuals is concerned is estimated to be 



about 25 seconds. A second pronounced 
shock of less violence than the first occurred 
at 11.43 p. m., October 1. The seismograph 
recorded vibrations for a period of one hour 
and 16 minutes after the movement first 
began. The direction as indicated b\' the 
record was from southwest to northeast, and 
the approximate distance of the epicenter of 
the disturbance was 115 miles. The intensity 
was Force VI on the Rossi-Forel scale, I toX. 

The above shock was onl>' one of a series, 
which began at 1.48 p. m., on Wednesday, 
October 1. All appear to be related and to 
have a common point of origin, thought to be 
southwest of Panama city in the province of 
Los Santos. From 11.25, Wednesday night, 
until 5.18 the following morning, eleven dis- 
tinct movements were recorded, and up to 
and including Monday, October 6, there had 
been 24, three only of which could be classed 
as pronounced. The third shock to be 
plainly felt occurred at 5.06 p. m., on Satur- 
day, October 4, but it was little more than 
half the intensity of the first severe disturb- 
ance and lasted not more than seven seconds. 

Advices received by the Panama Govern- 
ment from points in the interior, and wireless 
messages to the United Fruit Company from 
Bocas del Toro and Port Limon, indicate that 
Wednesday night's shock was not experienced 
in Costa Rica; that while noticeable at 
Bocas del Toro, and at David, in the province 
of Chiriqui, it was not strong enough to do any 
damage, and that its effect so far as known 
was greatest in the province of Los Santos 
about 110 miles distant from Panama City. 
In the village of Los Santos, the tower of the 
church, destroyed by the earthquake of Sep- 
tember 7, 1882, was again toppled over; the 
government building was wrecked; the walls 
of the police station cracked, and two or three 
dwellings damaged. In Macaracas, in the 
same province, the church tower fell, and at 
Las Tablas some damage was done to build- 
ings. Late advices received by the Panama- 
nian Government indicate that probably the 
heaviest damage was done in the vicinity of 
Tonosi, in the province of Los Santos. Xo 
fatalities have been reported aside from the 
death of a woman from fright in Pendnomc, 
province of Code. In Panama City, there 
was no damage of importance. Wednesday 
night's shock caused slight cracks to de\ elop 
in the walls of some three-story stone build- 
ings on Twelfth street, near Santa Ana Plaza, 
and the one on Saturday afternoon had a 
similar effect on a stone building on lower 
Central avenue. There has been no damage 
whatever to any part of the Canal work. 

Mr. D. F. McDonald, the Commission 
geologist, and Mr. W. C. Johnston, assistant 
chief engineer of the Republic of Panama, 
left on the Panama Steam^liip Company s 
Panama on Tuesday, October 7, to stud\- 
the effect of the disturbances in Los Santos 
province. 



DREDGES FOR CULEBRA CUT. 



\Vit» be Raised from Atlantic and Pacific En- 
trances to Complete Channel. 

It is purposed to pass a portion of the At- 
lantic entrance dredging fleet through Gatun 
Locks during the forenoon of Thursday, Oc- 
tober 9, for the excavation of Gamboa dike. 
Fourteen vessels will be lifted to the level of 
Gatun Lake and towed through the Canal 
channel to the vicinity of Gamboa, where 
they will lie ready to begin operations as soon 
as the blowing up of the dike has been com- 
pleted. The equipment will be handled as 
three groups, the pieces in each group being 
lashed together and towed by a tug. The 
French ladder dredges No. I and No. 5, with 
two dump scows of 400-cubic yards capac- 
ity, will compose one group; a second group 
will be two dump scows, a 75-ton coal scow, 
and a coal hoist; and the third group will be 
one 600-ton coal barge and two former cement 
lighters, adapted to hauling coal. It is be- 
lieved that the groups can be so arranged and 
handled as to be put through the locks to- 
gether, necessitating only one filling of each 
lift. After the groups have been conveyed 
across the lake, two of the tugs will return to 
the .Atlantic entrance, l-'a\-in< one to handle 
the barges from the dredges and for general 
service in the dredging operations. Forces of 
the Sixth Division have staked off areas in the 
old c'lannel of the Chagres River, opposite 
Gorgona. for the disposition of the spoil. The 
dumping grounds will be indicated by flags on 
stakes, and at night, by lights. 

By the time the two ladder dredges have 
cleared the entrance to Culebra Cut, pipeline 
suction dredges No. 4 and No. 86 will have 
been brought up from the Atlantic entrance. 
They will be towed along the Cut through the 
completed channel to the foot of Cucaracha 
slide, which is about six and a half miles from 
the north end of the Cut. Since steamshovel 
excavation was discontinued at the slide it 
has pushed across the channel, and is now 
blocking the flow of water from Gatun Lake. 
The first work at the slide will be to cut a 
trench to let the water through to the remain- 
der of the Cut, about two and a half miles 
to Pedro Miguel Locks. Water can then be 
passed through the wall culverts of the lock, 
if desired, to hasten the filling of Miraflores 
Lake and allow the passage of dredging ves- 
sels from the Pacific side. When this has been 
accomplished, pipeline dredge No. 85, an 
oil barge, a small lighter, a steam launch, 
and a barge to handle the removable span 
in the railroad bridge across the Cut at Pa- 
raiso, will be detached from ser\-ice in the 
Pacific entrance and raised through Miraflores 
and Pedro Miguel Locks to the south end of 
the Cut, and towed to the south side of Cu- 
caracha slide. -After the channel has been 
cleared, this dredge will be returned to the 
Pacific entrance. 

Two pipeline suction dredges will then 



54 



THE CANAL RECORD 



Vol. VII, No. 7. 



be available for service at the bottom of the 
slide. As the normal monthly output for each 
of these is approximately 200,000 cubic yards, 
it is expected that the two will be able to 
handle this excavation without difficulty. 
The laying of discharge pipes and the in- 
stallation of two relay stations for handling 
the spoil up the west bank of the Canal and 
over into the Rio Grande valley is sufficiently 
advanced to be ready for service as soon as 
needed. 

One of the pipeline dredges, No. 4, to be 
used on this work, came from the dry dock 
at Mount Hope on September 26, after ex- 
tensive overhauling and adaptation to the 
serv'ice required of it. Pontoons, five feet 
three inches wide by nine feet six inches deep 
were fitted on either side of the hull, ex- 
tending its entire length, 112 feet six inches, 
to provide storage for 400 barrels of fuel 
oil. This will make the dredge relatively 
independent of oil barges and allow it greater 
freedom of movement. Moreover, the ad- 
dition, by increasing the beam of the ves- 
sel from 29 feet six inches to 40 feet, en- 
larges its displacement and effects a desirable 
increase of freeboard. Additions will be made 
to the superstructure to provide quarters 
for the silver, as well as the gold members of 
the crew. 

Dredge No. 85 is only used on the south 
side of Cucuracha, until a channel is cut 
through allowing Nos. 4 and 86 to pass 
through the Cut, to station on south side of 
slide when No. 85 returnsto the terminals at 
Balboa. 



Permanent Water Stage Registers. 

Forces of the Lighthouse Subdivision are 
engaged in erecting, for the Second Division, 
four concrete towers for permanent water 
stage registers to record the ele\ation of the 
surfaces of Gatun and Miraflores Lakes when 
the Canal is in operation. One of these is 
situated at Gatun, between the Panama 
railroad and the present edge of the lake, 
and about 200 feet south of the concrete 
wharf for small vessels. The base of this 
tower is 72 feet above sealevel and the floor 
of the gage-recording room is at elevation 
plus 92. At the upper end of the lake and 
north end of Culebra Cut, is a second tower, 
situated on the east bank of the Chagres 
River, about 300 feet upstream from the 
Gamboa bridge of the Panama railroad. The 
base and floor of this tower are at elevations 
72 and 100 feet, respectively. The higher 
level than at Gatun is for the purpose of 
better recording the rises in the river. 

Two other towers are at the upper and 
lower ends of Pedro Miguel Lock. The one 
at the outer end of the northeast wing wall 
will record the levels at the extreme southern 
end of Culebra Cut. It is set at the same 
level as the tower at Gatun. The other, at 
the end of the southeast wing wall, will gage 
the surface of Miraflores Lake. Its base is 
38 feet above sealevel, and the floor, 68 feet. 

A fifth tower will be constructed below the 
Gatum Dam spillway. Part of the material 
for it has been delivered at the site, and 
erection will begin shortly. 

In construction, these are modified forms 
of what has been designated locally as the 
Atlantic and Pacific type of range tower. 
The concrete was placed between collapsible 
steel forms which were used for the erection 
of the lighthouses along the two entrance 



channels. The roof has been extended, the 
interior stairway omitted, and a bridge foot- 
walk added, at the level of the floor. The 
foundation bases of the towers are concrete 
slabs, octagonal in plan, having inscribed 
diameters of from 16 to 18 feet, according to 
the depth of water in which the towers are 
built. The inside of the shaft is circular, 
seven feet 10 inches in diameter, and the 
wall varies in thickness from four inches at 
the top to 15 inches at the base. The towers 
are designed to withstand any shock of wave 
action to which they may be sub- jected. 
All of the towers will be equipped with 
automatic water stage registers, and those at 
Gamboa and Pedro Miguel will each, in 
addition, be equipped with an anemometer, 
anemoscope, and meteorograph. 

♦ 

Order Retaining Lieut-Col. D. D. Gaillard as a 
Member of the Canal Commission. 

War Department, 
Washington, D. C. 
Lieut.-Col. D. DuB. Gaillard, Corps of 
Engineers, U. S. A., Member of the Isth- 
mian Canal Commission now on leave of 
absence, will be retained as a member of the 
Isthmian Canal Commission and is hereby 
granted leave of absence with full pay on 
status of sick leave, until further notice. 
By direction of the President. 

LiNDLEY M. Garrison, 

Secretary of War. 
September 20, 1913. 

♦ 

Concrete Work in Loclcs and Spillways. 
Concrete work in the Canal locks is nearly 
completed, the aggregate amount in place 
at the close of work on October 4, being 
4,480,728 cubic yards. 

A statement ot the ''concrete laid in the 
three sets of locks for the Canal, and in 
Gatun and Miraflores spillways, as of 
October 4, follows: 

GATUN LOCKS. 

The last concrete for the locks proper, as distinguished 
from that necessary to finishing work by tlie First 
Division, was mixed and placed on August 16, 1913. 
At the clos3 of worli on ihat day the total amount of 
concrete placed by the Atlantic Division amounted to 
2,045,485 cubic yards. 

PEDRO MIGUEL LOCK. 

Concrete laid. 

Cubic yards. 

Oct. 4 2 



CANAL ZONE SCHOOLS. 



Total 2 

Previously reported 924,183 



Grand total 924,185 

MIRAFLORES LOCKS. 

Sept. 29 42 

Sept. 30 29 

Oct. 1 

Oct. 2 

Oct. 3 

Oct. 4 



Total 71 

Previously reported 1.S10.987 



Grand total 1,511,058 

GATUN SPILLWAY.* 

Sept. 29 58 

Sept. 30 40 

Oct. 1 60 

Oct. 2 SO 

Oct. 3 170 

Oct. 4 34 



Total 412 

Previously reported 236,320 



Grand total 236,732 

MIRAFLORES SPILLWAY. 

Sept. 29 

Sept. 30 

Oct. 1 

Oct. 2 136 

Oct. 3 149 

Oct. 4 63 



Total 348 

Previously reported 75,610 



Grand total. 



7S.9S8 



*lnclades hydroelectric station. 



Reopened October 1, With an Increased First Day 
Enrollment of White Children. 

The Canal Zone schools were opened on 
Wednesday, October 1, with an increased en- 
rollment over the first day last year in the 
schools for white children, of 54. There are 
11 grade schools for white children, and high 
schools at Ancon, Empire, and Gatun. The 
first day's enrollment by schools, follows: 
Ancon (grades), 175; Corozal, 103; Pedro 
Miguel, 61; Paraiso, 28; Culebra, 30; Em- 
pire, 161; Las Cascadas (church building), 
25, (hotel building) 23; Gatun, 98; Cristobal, 
188; Porto Bello, nine; high schools, Ancon, 
23; Empire, 18; Gatun, 21; Total 963. 

To this total should be added 13 children 
living at Bas Obispo, assigned to school at 
Las Cascadas, who were not enrolled on the 
first day, because transportation was not pro- 
vided for them. Forty-three regular teachers 
and two substitute teachers are employed in 
the white schools. 

In 10 schools for colored children there were 
550 children enrolled on the first day. This 
number does not include the enrollment in the 
school for native children at Majagual, the 
report of which has not been received. Fol- 
lowing is the enrollment by schools: Ancon, 
92; Paraiso, 25; Cucaracha, 20; Culebra, 80; 
Empire, 85; Mandingo, 25; Gatun, 39; 
Mount Hope, 11; Cristobal, 173. Twenty- 
five colored teachers are employed in these 
schools. 

The assignment of white teachers is, as 
follows: 

Ancon-Empire high schools — Albert R. 
Lang, principal, N. F. Petersen, Frederika 
Hine, Dorothy Riedesel, Amelia C. deLassus. 

Ancon — Bertha H. Mallory, principal, 
Shellie M. Dunn, Sara D. Elwell, Mallye A. 
DeCamp, Jessie Wilson Clark, Etta Reed. 

Corozal — Mary M. Shea, principal, Anna 
Mosteller, Anna R. Young, Edna M. Spencer, 
Mary Edmonds. 

Pedro Miguel — Ida O. Erickson, principal, 
Clelia Crespi Calhoun, Florence Cruson. 

Paraiso — Mary F. Adams. 

Culebra — Jennie D. Perkins, principal, Ida 
Keys Lawlor. 

Empire — Elise Cage, principal, Natalie 
Hine Humphrey, Lucy Nichols, Dove L. 
Prather, Jeannette McClure, Ida B. Potts. 

Las Cascadas — Hotel building, Marie Bir- 
mingham; church building, Charlotte Carter. 

Gatun — Jessie E. Daniels, principal and high 
school, Archie Pratt, high school, Shirley C. 
Dorsey, Annie E. Stone, Ezoa Smith, Cora 
E. Sessions. 

Cristobal — Emma M. Cobban, principal, 
Wenonah Whiting Dillon, Edith Mclntyre 
McCarthy, Florence M. Dildine, Helen 
Daniels Parmelee, Leah A. Zook. 

Porto Bello— \evna. M. Sawtelle. 

Substitute teachers — Grace E. McCray, pri- 
mary grades; Georgia T. Munroe, upper 

grades. 

♦ 

Accidental Drowning. 

John F. Stanton, a private in Company A, 
Tenth Infantry, at Camp Otis, was acci- 
dentally drowned in the Canal, at a point 
about opposite the camp, about noon on 
Sunday, September 28. He was born in 
Philadelphia a little over 21 years ago, was 
unmarried, and had been on the Isthmus 
since May 13, 1913. A friend, Charles Lan- 
das, lives at No. 512 North Eleventh street, 
Philadelphia. 



i 



Oelobtr S. 1913. 



THE CANAL RECORD 



55 



MIRAFLORES LAKE. 



Rise Began October 1, to Provide Passage Between 
Pedro Mifiue! and Mirafiores Locks. 

The formation of Mirafiores Lake began on 
October 1, when a timber bulkhead was placed 
across the drainage culvert in the spillway 
dam, which, with its bottom at 5.3 i feet above 
sealevel, was the final diversion of the Rio 
Grande and its tributaries, the Pedro Miguel, 
Caimitillo, Cameron, Cocoli, and Do- 
minica Rivers, during the construction of the 
spillway. The opening is being filled with 
concrete. 

It is estimated by the hydrographic ofiice 
that the normal run-off, calculated from 22 
years' rainfall measurements, from the 55.5 
square miles of lake watershed will raise the 
lake surface to elevation 35. S feet above sea- 
level by the end of October; to elevation 
38.67, level with the top of the ogee of the 
spillway dam, on November 4: and to the 



The location and outlines of Mirafiores 
Lake are indicated in the accompanying 
sketch. The purpose of the lake is to avoid 
the excavatinn which would have been re- 
quired for a sealevel channel from the site of 
Mirafiores Locks to Pedro Miguel, approxi- 
mately 15,000,000 cubic yards. The bottom 
of the channel across the lake, between the tw j 
locks, is 10 feet above sealevel, which is 55 
feet higher than that of the sealevel section on 
the Pacific side. A part of the channel through 
Mirafiores Lake is naturally at or below eleva- 
tion plus 10, and some excavation was made 
by the French in this area. An old ladder 
dredge, abandoned in the channel it was 
cutting through this area, has recently been 
set afloat, after repairs to its hull, by the 
rising waters of the lake. A secondary use 
of the lake will be as a source of water 
supply for the Canal villages on the southern 
slope nf the continental divide, and for 




MiRAFLORES 

Showing relation to Pedro Miguel and Mirafiores 
normal operating level of 55 feet above the 
sea, by December 4. 

Should it be desired to fill the lake earlier, 
however, water may be drawn from the high 
level of Gatun Lake and Culebra Cut, through 
the culverts of Pedro Miguel Locks. To 
fill Mirafiores Lake completely, from dry land 
to proposed normal level, would lower the sur- 
face of Gatun Lake, from its present elevation 
of about 67 feet, not more than .35 foot. 
Filling Culebra Cut will lower Gatun Lake 
about .118 foot. Hence, to fill both Cut 
and Mirafiores Lake would lower Gatun Lake 
from its present level less than six inches, 
which is equivalent to retarding its rise 
about three days. Further comparison of 
the two lakes is shown herewith: 



Elevation of surface, ft. . . . 
Area watershed, sq. miles . 
Area surface, sq. miles. .... 
Capacity, million cu. feet. . 

Canal channel, miles 

Width of channel, feet 

Elevation, bottom of channel, ft 




Gatu 



Lake. 
Locks, Panama railroad, tributary streams, etc. 

Panama, for which a pumping and filtration 
plant, capable of handling about 15,000,000 
gallons daily, is under construction on the 
east side of the lake. 

The northeast section of the lake area is 
crossed by the relocated line of the Panama 
railroad, between Mirafiores tunnel and Pedro 
Miguel. Filling is now in progress to increase 
the area available for Pedro Miguel village, 
east of the railroad, and a depressed area 
between the track and Pedro Miguel Locks 
is also to be raised above the 55-foot contour. 
The Canal village of Mirafiores is being re- 
moved, and the native houses in the lake area 
have been demolished or burned. The San- 
itary Department has cleared the area of 
trees and brush below the 55-foot level, in 
order to prevent as far as possible the breeding 
of mosquitoes. 



85 

1,320 
163.4 
183,136.2 
*31 
300 to 1,000 
40 



•Including nine miles in Culebra Cut. 



Fatal Accidents. 

George C. Gunthorpe, an Antiguan, check 
No. 165861, employed as a carpenter in the 
Fifth Division, and William Elliott, a native 
of the island of Nevis, check No. 161764, em- 
ployed as a laborer in the same division, 
were accidentally drowned while working in 



the T-culvert in the east wall at the south 
end of Pedro Miguel Locks, at about 12.50 
p. m., on Thursday, October 2. Both ends 
of the culvert had been dammed by bags of 
sand to prevent the inflow of water while the 
men, nine in number, were at work. The 
barrier at the south end gave way, and 
cai'ght two men before they could escape. 
Th^ other five workmen succeeded in reach- 
i. "^ a place of safety. 

.'of^eph Brown, a Jamaican, check No. 
191907, employed as a carpenter in the Di- 
vision of Municipal Engineering, was struck 
on the head by a rock from a "dobey" blast 
at the site of the new reservoir on Ancon Hill, 
at about 4 p. m., on Friday, October 3, sus- 
taining injuries from which he died less than 
an hour later. 

Wilford Walkin, a native of Fortune Island, 
check No. 8922, employed by the Panama 
railroad, was drowned at Balboa at about 
4.25 p. m., on Saturday, October 4. He at- 
tempted to board I. C. C. engine No. 533, 
but missed his footing and fell between a 
wooden trestle into the water. The body 
was recovered. 



Obituary. 

Mrs. J. F. Hern, residing at Ancon, died 
at Ancon Hospital on Monday, September 
29. She was 34 years of age, had t>een on 
the Isthmus seven years, and is survived by 
her husband, anemployeof the Fifth Division 
at Balboa. 

Samuel Jackson, an American in the em- 
ploy of the United States Steel Products 
Company, with residence at Balboa, died at 
Ancon Hospital on Wednesday, October 1. 
He was 24 years of age, was unmarried, and 
had been on the Isthmus four months. 

Word has been received of the death of 
William T. Reynolds, formerly a superintend- 
ent of construction in the Central Division, 
who resigned on September 13, 1913, andleft 
forthe United States on the Colon on Septem- 
ber 14. He died at a hospital in New York 
City soon after the steamer docked. He 
entered the service of the Canal Commission 
on October 15, 1906, and was continuously in 
the employ of the old Culebra Division, and 
later the Central Division, up to the time of 
his resignation. He was a native of Mary- 
land, 40 years of age, and was unmarried. 



Columbus Day Exercises. 
The exercises under the auspices of the 
Knights of Columbus, in obser\'ance of Co- 
lumbus Day, will be held this year at Panama, 
on Sunday, October 12. At 9.15 a. m., or 
as soon thereafter as the arrival of the first 
train from Colon will permit, high mass will 
be sung at the Cathedral; lunch at Hotel 
Central at 12 noon; regular meeting of 
Panama Council and election of officers for 
ensuing year, 1 p.m.; exemplification of the 
first and second degrees, Ancon Hall, 2 p. m.; 
banquet. Hotel Tivoli, 9 p. m. Special trains 
will leave for both Bas Obispo and Colon di- 
rectly after the banquet. Rooms will be 
provided at the Hotel Tivoli for rest and 
dressing. All Catholics, irrespective of af- 
filiation with the Knights of Columbus, are 
extended an invitation to participate at the 
mass, lunch, and banquet. 



Married. 

CRITCHLOW-MOHLER— At the home of the 
bride's parents in Ithaca, N. Y., on Wednesday, Sep- 
tember 24. Miss Grace Isabel Mohler to Mr. Howard 
Thompson Critchlow, of Prospect, Pa. Canal Zone 
residence, Culebra. 



56 



THE CANAL RECORD 



Vel. Vn, No. 7. 



EAST BREAKWATER. 



Construction Contemplated as a Preventive 
Against Silting in Atlantic Channel. 

The construction of an east breakwater 
in Limon Bay is contemplated, and some 
preliminary work has been authorized. The 
Toro Point, or west breakwater, now nearly 
completed, with the exception of the armored 
portion, is designed for the protection of the . 
Colon and Cristobal harbors and the shelter 
of vessels against "Northers," and its line 
of direction is normal tq the prevailing wind 
during these storms. It was not built to 
afford protection against wave action produced 
by the "Trades," which prevail almost con- 
stantly in these latitudes during the dry 
season, and which generally come from the 
north or northeast. The trade winds will 
not endanger the safety of vessels using the 
Canal, and, therefore, do not on this account 
enter into the necessity for an east breakwater. 

Another factor, however, has developed, 
one which has an important bearing on the 
cost of maintaining the Atlantic channel. 
Soundings and sur\-eys that have been made 
from time to time show that the trade winds 
wash the shores of Limon Bay in the vicinity 
of the Canal entrance, and a sur\'ey made 
in March, 1913, showed that the channel in the 
vicinity of the Canal entrance, previously 
excavated to its full depth of 41 feet, had 
filled, so that a depth of but 27 feet was avail- 
able, and this only in the middle of the chan- 
nel. During the 12 months previous to this 
time it was estimated that the accumulation 
of silt in the channel amounted to 2,213,082 
cubic yards. An investigation of this con- 
dition led to the belief that this silting was 
in a large measure due to the trade winds, 
which, upon disturbing the soft material in 
the bottom of the bay into a state of suspen- 
sion, later deposited it again, during cessation 
of the winds, a large part settling in the deep- 
er channel. The soundings showed that the 
deposit was generally uniform in the channel, 
with the exception of that part near the 
shores of the bay. 

During the visit of the Atlantic Fleet to the 
Canal about nine months ago, it lay at anchor 
under the lee of the «est breakwater, and 
it was a difficult matter at times, due to the 
strong "Trades" blowing, for small boats to 
reach the ships. As a result of this con- 
dition, the General Board of the Navy rec- 
ommended the construction of a detached 
breakwater for theprotection of the anchorage 
area, which would afi'ord security to small 



boats, and to barges engaged in coaling, while 
lying alongside a ship. 

It is proposed to e.xtend the new break- 
water out from Coco Solo Point on the east 
side of the Bay of Manzanillo, and authority 
has been granted for the construction of a 
railroad track to Coco Solo Point, leading ofif 
from the Mount Hope— Margarita Point line, 
thereby establishing a track connection with 
the Panama railroad main line at the Cris- 
tobal yards. The length of the new track will 
be about 3,500 feet. A quantity of piling 
for building the breakwater trestle has been 
ordered, together with a new piledriver. In- 
vestigations have been conducted in the 
endeavor to find a quarry more accessible 
than the one at Porto Bello. A rock deposit 
near Mile Post 24s, north of Caimito, was 
explored, but it is doubtful if sufficiently large 
rockcanbeprocuredforthearmor of the break- 
water. It is probable that rock for the in- 
terior will be quarried at this locality. 



Transfer of Masonic Temple to Panama Railroad. 

The Masonic lodge has relinquished all of 
its rights and equities in its partly finished 
temple at Colon, including the original con- 
tract with the McClintic-Marshall Construc- 
tion Company, to the Panama railroad, and 
has also released the McClintic Marshall 
Company from its contractual obligations; 
the railroad, therefore, now owns the builfl- 
ing, and has recovered possession of the land 
on which it stands through cancellation of 
the lease. The Masonic lodge has reserved 
the right to purchase the building from the 
railroad within five years at the full cost price, 
plus eight per cent interest. 

The restoration of the foundations was 
undertaken by the Panama railroad, and in- 
volved a much greater amount of work than 
was first anticipated. Diamond drill borings 
made over the site of the structure showed 
that the foundations rested on filled ground, 
consisting of earth and rock, superimposed on 
a bed of decomposed coral rock and soft mud. 
This had very little supporting power, as 
demonstrated by the fact that the rate of 
progress in drilling was, in some cases, as high 
as 60 feet an hour. The lowest point was 
found to be in the northeast corner of the 
building, where the foundations had settled 
1.53 feet. The place of least settlement was 
at the southwest corner. It was found that 
the Eleventh street side had settled more 
than the remaining portion, and as the entire 
structure was considerably out of plumb, it 
was determined to adjust the side walls and 



the interior foundations to agree with some 
given point. The Eleventh street side was 
accordingly selected as the base to work from, 
and it was decided to settle the west and south 
sides to make their foundations agree with 
■ those on the Eleventh street side. The plan 
adopted was to drive untreated piling entirely 
around the e.xterior of the building; to sink 
10 and 12-inch wrought iron pipe, filled with 
concrete, along the inside walls; to install 
new foundations of 16 and 20-inch pipe, filled 
with concrete, for nine individual columns in 
the center of the building, and to put in a 

number of reinforced concrete footings. 

^ 

PERSONAL. 



William Jennings Price, the new American 
Minister at Panama, arrived on the Isthmus 
on the Colon, on October 3. He made a formal 
call upon Col. Goethals at Culebra on October 
6, presented his credentials to the Minister 
of Foreign Affairs of the Panama republic 
on October 7, and entered upon his duties as 
Minister, after calling officially upon President 
Porras.on October 9. Mr. Price is a resident 
of Danville, Ky., and is a lawyer by profession. 
He has held no public office previous to his 
present position, 

Mr. VV. W. Warwick, Assistant Comp- 
troller of the Treasur>', accompanied by Mrs. 
Warwick, and their son, arrived on the Isth- 
mus on the Ancon, on Thursday, October 2. 
He was called here to confer with local Canal 
Commission officials relative to a permanent 
system of accounting. 

Lieut. Frederick Mears, accompanied by 
his family, returned from leave of absence, 
on the Ancon, on Thursday, October 2. 



Colonel Gorgas and Assistants to Investigate 
Sanitary Conditions in South Africa. 

Col. W. C. Gorgas, accompanied by Mrs. 
Gorgas, will sail on the United Fruit Com- 
pany's steamer Carrillo for New York on 
Tuesday, October 14. Col. Gorgas has been 
granted four months special leave of absence, 
and, together with Maj. Robert E. Noble 
and Dr. S. T. Darling, will leave New York 
about November 1 for Johannesburg, South 
Africa. At Johannesburg, they will make 
investigations and recommendations regard- 
ing the sanitation of the district of the con- 
solidated mines of the Rand, at the request 
of the companies in the consolidation, which 
employ about 203,003 men. 

♦^ 

Commissary Cold Storage. 
No changes are reported in the list of cold storage 
supplies sold at the commissaries published in The 
Canai. Record of October 1. 



CLASSIFIED EXPENDITURES— ISTHMIAN CANAL COMMISSION. 



A statement of classified expenditures of the Isthmian Canal Commission to June 30, 1913, follows: 



Periods. 


Department 

of Civil 

Administration. 


Department 

of 

Law. 


Department 

of 
Sanitation. 


Department of 

Construction 

and Engineering 


General Items. 


Fortifications. 


Total, 


Total to June 30. 1909 


3 427.090.29 
709.351 37 
755,079.44 
8i0,.W8 57 
63.91 i. 12 
62.182.51 
59.201.01 
64.383.37 
62.200.12 
58,987.96 
57.699.58 
56,.i>-6.U6 
58,761 .O.i 
57,218.29 
57.814.27 
22.441.74 


' 24.729.16' 
1.448.53 
1.468.26 
1.207.82 
2,033.75 
1,892.14 
1,462.18 
1.469 59 
1.649.00 
1.899.22 
1.585.87 
2,872.19 
1,264.56 


9.673.539.28 
1.803.040.95 
1,717,792.62 
1,620,391.12 
123,803.64 
123,154.48 
120,385.70 
137,574.61 
119,031.66 
115,819.26 
114,562 04 
127,324 80 
105,891 08 
114,146 79 
115,.598.00 
118,108.90 


69.622.561.42 
26.300,167.05 
27,477,776.19 
28,897,738.10 
2,649.246.61 
2.539.680.83 
2.285.979.89 
2.473.280.76 
2.420.085.77 
2.871,977.03 
2,825,872.06 
3.784,370 51 
2,712,218. 10 
2,677,640.00 
2,849,292 60 
2,928.208.83 


78,022.606.10 

2,863.088 S3 

3,097,959.72 

2.819.926.53 

200.970.55 

*98.054.61 

77.003.53 

83.523.30 

75,779.01 

120,946.61 

6.463.72 

123 034 12 

*7.706 70 

132.223.98 

169.306.77 

179,832.24 




160.745.797.09 


Total— Fiscal Year. 1910 


31.675.648.20 


Total — Fiscal Year, 1911 




33.018.607.97 


Total— Fiscal Year. 1912 

July. 1912 


1.212.881.66 
104.126.92 
111.402.55 
127.168.25 
129.736.37 
300.016.33 
118.152.57 
119,272 77 
31 1.994,96 
1 < 1 .940 7S 
131,970.9! 
164,275.24 
14'i,418. 22 


.55.396.065 . 14 
3.143.509 37 
2.739.834.02 


September, 1912 


2.67iJ,946 20 


October. 1912 


2,S9J,532. 16 


November. 1912 


2 979,005.03 


December. 1912 


3,287.345.61 


January, 1913 


3.125.339 76 


Februari', 1913 


4,4M/.959 45 


March, 1913 


3.0- ''.003. 48 


AprU. 1913 


3.1 i 1.78.5.86 


May, 1913 


3.3''>. 159.07 


June. 1913 


i.i 8.274.49 






Grand total. . . 


6.353,308.73 


44,982 27 


16,250.164 93 


185,316,095-75 


87.S66.903. 70 


3, 114.357. .'^2 


298.98i.~12. 90 



• Denotes credit. 



October 8, 1913. 



THE CANAL RECORD 



57 



EXECUTIVE ORDER. 



To Provide Maritime Quarantine Regulations for 
the Canal Zone and ttie Harbors of the Cities 
of Panama and Colon, Republic of Panama. 

Whereas the official opening of the Panama 
Canal will require a revision of the maritime 
quarantine regulations of the Canal Zone 
and the harbors of the cities of Panama and 
Colon, Republic of Panama, and 

Whereas the Government of the United 
States and the authorities of the Canal Zone 
are authorized to establish such rules and 
regulations for the ports and harbors of said 
cities, by virtue of the second paragraph of 
Article VII of the Treaty between the United 
States and the Republic of Panama for the 
construction of the Isthmian Canal, signed 
November 18, 1903, which paragraph reads, 
as follows: 

"The Republic of Panama agrees that 
the cities of Panama and Colon shall 
comply in perpetuity with the sanitary 
ordinances whether of a preventive or 
curative character, prescribed by the 
United States and in case the Government 
of Panama is unable or fails in its duty 
to enforce this compliance by the cities 
of Panama and Colon with the sanitary 
ordinances of the United States the Re- 
public of Panama grants to the United 
States the right and authority to enforce 
the same." 

and Section 6 of the Executive Order of 
December 3, 1904, known as the Taft Agree- 
ment made between the Secretary of War 
of the United States and the Chief Executive 
of the Republic of Panama, which section 
reads, as follows: 

"Section 6. This Order also shall be 
inoperative unless the proper Governmen- 
tal authorities of the Republic of Panama 
shall grant power to the authorities of 
the Canal Zone to exercise immediate and 
complete jurisdiction in matters of sani- 
tation and quarantine in the maritime 
wateis of the ports of Panama and 
Colon." 

and Article I of Decree No. 66 of December 
6, 190-i, issued by the President of Panama, 
agreeably to said E.xecutive Order, and pub- 
lished in the Official Gazette, No. 70, of 1904, 
which article reads, as follows: 

"Article I. The authorities of the Ca- 
nal Zoneare empowered to e.xercise freely, 
immediate and complete jurisdiction in 
all matters of sanitation and quarantine 
in the waters of the ports of Panama and 
Colon. In consequence, the authorities 
of the Republic shall proceed in conform- 
ity with the provisions of this decree to 
the end that these may be strictly com- 
plied with." 

By virtue of the authority vested in me and 
in conformity with the foregoing treaty pro- 
vision and the Executive Order and Presi- 
dential Decree above mentioned, I hereby 
establish the following maritime quarantine 
regulations for the Canal Zone and for the 
harbors of the cities of Panama and Colon, 
Republic of Panama: 

BILLS OF HEALTH. 
Section 1. — Masters of vessels clearing 
from any foreign port or from any port in the 
possessions or other dependencies of the 
United States for a port in the Canal Zone 
or for the ports of Panama or Colon, Republic 
of Panama, must obtain an original bill of 
health in duplicate from the officer or officers 
authorized by the quarantine laws and regu- 
lations of the United States to sign such 



certificates for vessels entering the ports of 
the United States. 

The following form is prescribed for such 
bills of health: 

Form No. . 

CANAL ZONE. 
Original BUI of Health. 

I, (the person authorized to issue 

the bill, at the port of ), do hereby 

state that the vessel hereinafter named clears 

from the port of under the following 

circumstances: 

Name of vessel, . Nationality, 

■ — ■. Rig, ■ ■ — . Master, . 

Tonnage, gross, ; net, . Iron 

or wood, . Number of compartments 

for cargo, ; For steerage passengers. 



When there are no cases or deaths, entry 
to that effect must be made. 

I certify that the vessel has complied with 
the quarantine rules and regulations made 
under the Act of February 15, 1893, and that 

the vessel leaves this port bound for , 

Canal Zone, or , Republic of Panama, 

via . 

Given under my hand and seal this , 

day of , 191 



-. For crew. 



; of crew, in- 
; of passengers, 



Name of medical officer. 

Number of officers, — 

eluding petty officers, 

first cabin, ; second cabin 

steerage, . Officers' families, . 

Total number of persons on board, — -. 

Passengers destined for the Canal Zone or 

the city of Panama or Colon, first 

cabin, second cabin, steerage. 

Previous port, . 

Number of cases of sickness, and character 
of same, during last voyage, . 

Number of cases of sickness and character 
of same, while vessel was in this port, . 

Vessel engaged in trade, and plies 

between and . 

Nature, sanitary history, and condition of 
cargo . 

Source and wholesomeness of water supply. 



Source and wholesomeness of food supply. 



Sanitary history and health of officers and 
crew, . 

Sanitarj' history and health of passengers, 
cabin, . 

Sanitary history and health of passengers, 
steerage, . 

Sanitary history and condition of their 
effects, . 

Location of vessel while in port — wharf, 
; open bay, ; distance from 



shore. 



Time vessel was in port, . 

Character of communication with shore, 



Sanitary condition of vessel, . 

Sanitary measures, if any, adopted while 

in port, . 

Sanitary condition of port and vicinity. 



Prevailing diseases at port and vicinity, 
Malaria, deaths during month of 



Yellow fever 

Asiatic cholera 

Ciiolera nostras, or cholerine . 

Smallpox 

Typhus fever 

Plague 

Leprosy 



No. of 
cases. 



No. of 
deaths. 



Number of cases and deaths from the fol- 
lowing-named diseases during the past two 
weeks, ending . 



REMARKS. 

Any condition affecting the public health 
existing in the port of departure or vicinity 
to be here stated. 



(Signature of consular officer) • 
(seal) 



Section 2. — Vessels clearing from any 
foreign port or from any port in the pos- 
sessions or other dependencies of the United 
States for a port in the Canal Zone or for 
the port of Panama or Colon, Republic of 
Panama, and entering or calling at interme- 
diate ports, must procure at all said ports a 
supplemental bill of health in duplicate, from 
the officer or officers authorized by the quar- 
antine laws and regulations of the United 
States to sign such certificates for vessels 
entering the ports of the United States. If 
a quarantinable disease has appeared on 
board the vessel after leaving the original 
port of departure, or other circumstances pre- 
sumably render the vessel infected, the sup- 
plemental bill of health should be with- 
held until such sanitary measures have been 
taken as are necessary. 

The following form is prescribed for sup- 
plemental bills of health: 

canal zone. 
Supplemental BUI of Health. 

Port of . 

Vessel , bound from -^ 



Canal Zone, or 



— to 
-, Republic of 



Panama. 

Sanitary condition of port and vicinity, 



Prevailing diseases at port and vicinity. 



Malaria, 



deaths during month of 



Number of cases and deaths from the fol- 
lowing-named diseases during the past two 
weeks, ending — 



Diseases. 



Yellow fever 

Asiatic cholera 

Cholera nostras, or chol 

erine 

Smallpox 

Typhus fever 

Plague 

Leprosy 



No. of No. of 
cases, deaths. 



Remarks.* 



*Any condition affecting the public health existing 
in the port to be stated here. When there are no cases, 
or deaths, entry to that effect must be made. 

Number and sanitary condition of pas- 
sengers and crew landed at this port: 

First cabin. No. ; sanitary history 

and condition, . 

Second cabin. No. ; sanitary history 

and condition . 



; sanitary history 

sanitary condition and 



Steerage, No. 
and condition — 

Crew, No. 

history . 

Note — If any passenger or member of 
crew disembarked on account of sickness, 
state disease. 

Number and sanitary condition of pas- 
sengers and crew taken on at this port, and 
sanitary condition of effects: 

First cabin. No. ; sanitary conditio! 

and history, . 

Second cabin. No. ; sanitary con- 
dition and history, . 



58 



THE CANAL RECORD 



Vol. VII. No. 7. 



Steerage, No. 



sanitary condition 



and history, . 

Number of passengers for Canal Zone: 

first cabin, second cabin, 

steerage. 

Number of passenger?, for Republic of 

Panama: ^- first cabin, second 

cabin, — — — steerage. 

Crew, No. ; aanitary condition and 

historj', . 

Sanitary condition of effects, . 

Total passengers on board, ; total 

crew on board, . 

Sanitary measures, if any, adopted while 
in port, . 

Location of vessel while in port — wharf, 

; open bay, ■ — ; distance from 

chore, . 



Time vessel was in port, . 

Character of com.munication with 



ihore. 



Nature, sanitary history, and condition of 

cargo taken on at this port, . 

(Cancel Form A, B, or C, as the case requires.) 
Form. 

(Form A wiU\ 
be used at inter- 
mediate ports 
where the vessel i 
does not enter.) I 



no quarantinable dis- 
ease has appeared 
aboard since leav- 
ing . 



A —To the best of my 
knowledge and be- 
lief— 
B — I have satisfied 

myself that— 
C — Since leaving , the following quar- 
antinable disease has appeared on board 
, and I certify that the necessary sani- 
tary measures have been taken. 

I certify also that with reference to the pas- 
sengers, effects, and cargo taken on at this 
port, the vessel has complied with the rule; 
and regulations made under the Act of Feb- 
ruary 15, 1893. 

Given under my hand and seal this 

day of 191—. 

(Signature of consular officer:) 

(seal) , 



Section 3. — The master of a vessel entering 
the ports of the Canal Zone or the ports of 
Panam.'xand Colon, Republic of Panama, from 
any port of the United States, must present 
to the Quarantine Officer and to the Customs 
Officer of the Canal Zone, or his authorized 
agent, each a bill of health signed by the 
customs officer of the port of the United 
States from which said vessel sails. 

FOREIGN REGULATIONS. 

Inspection of Vessels from Foreign Ports and 

Ports in the Dependencies of the United States. 

Section 4. — The officer issuing che bill of 
health shall satisfy himself, by inspection if 
necessary, that the conditions certified to 
therein are true, and is authorized to withhold 
the bill of health or the supplemental bill of 
health until he is satisfied that the vessel, the 
passengers, the crew, and the cargo have com- 
plied with these regulations. 

Section 5. — Inspection is required of: 

(a) All vessels from ports in which cholera, 
yellow fever, or plague in men or rodents pre- 
vails, or at which smallpox or typhus fever 
prevails in epidemic form, and at which a 
medical officer is derailed. 

(b) All vessels carrying steerage passengers ; 
but need only include the inspection of such 



passengers and their living apartments, if 
sailing from a healthful port. 

(c) Inspection of the vessel is such an exam- 
ination of the vessel, cargo, passengers, crew, 
personal effects of same, including examina- 
tion of manifests and other papers, food 
and water supply, the ascertainment of its 
relations with the shore, the manner of load- 
ing and possibilities of invasion by rats and 
insects as will enable the inspecting officer 
to determine if these regulations have been 
complied with. 

(d) When an inspection is re(iuired. It 
ohould be made by daylight, as late as practi- 
cable before sailing. The vessel should be in- 
spected before the passengers go aboard, the 
passenger.^ just before embarkation, and the 
crew on deck, and no communication should 
be had with the vessel after such inspection 
except by permission of the officer issuing 
the bill of health. 

GENERAL REQUIREMENTS. 

Section 6. — Vessels, prior to stowing cargo 
or receiWng pas.sengers, should be mechan- 
ically clean in all parto, especially :he hold, 
forecastle, and steerage. 

Section 7. — Any portions of the vessel 
liable to have been infected by any communi- 
cable disease should be disinfected before the 
issuance of the bill of health. 

Section 8. — Street sweepings, city clean- 
ings, or anything containing organic refuse 
should not be taken as ballast from any port. 

Section 9. — Bedding, upholstered furni- 
ture, soiled wearing apparel, personal effects, 
and second-hand articles of a similar nature, 
coming from a district known to be infected 
with cholera, smallpox, typhus fever, or as to 
the origin of which no positive evidence can be 
obtained, and which the consular or medical 
officer has reason to believe are infected, 
should be disinfected prior to shipment. In 
the case of typhus fever, the destruction of 
vermin should be assured. Articles similar 
to the abovementioned, if from a district in- 
fected by plague, should be inspected, and, if 
necessary, disinfected and treated to destroy 
vermin. 

Section 10. — Articles from an uninfected 
district shipped through an infected port may 
be accepted without restriction if not exposed 
to infection in transit. 

Section 11. — Any article shipped from or 
through an infected port or place, and which 
the consul or medical officer has reason to be- 
lieve infected, should be disinfected. 

Section 12. — Any article presumably in- 
fected, which cannot be disinfected, should 
not be shipped. 

Section 13. — Passengers, for the purpose of 
these regulations, are divided into two classes, 
cabin and steerage, (a) 

Section 14. — So far as possible passengers 
should avoid embarking at a port where quar- 
antinable disease prevails, and communica- 
tion between the vessel and the shore should 
be reduced to a minimum. In such a port the 
personnel of the vessel should remain on board 
during their stay. 

Vessels carrying passengers from any port 
where quarantinable disease prevails in epi- 
demic form should have a medical officer. 

Section 15. — No person suffering from a 

(o) The sanitary measures applicable to second cabin 
passengers will be those designated tor first cabin pas- 
sengers or for steerage passengers, according as the ar- 
rangements of their quarters and accommodations 
aboard, both sanitary and for association, class them in 
the opinion of the inspecting officer with the first cabin 
or steerage. 



quarantinable disease, or scarlet fever, measles, 
diphtheria, or other communicable disease, 
should be allowed to ship. 

Section 16. — All baggage of steerage pas- 
sengers destined for the Canal Zone, or the 
ports of Panama or Colon, Republic of Pana- 
ma, should be labeled. If the baggage is in 
good sanitary condition, the label shall be a 
red label bearing the name of the port, the ves- 
sel on which the baggage is to be carried, the 
word "Passed" in large type, the date of in- 
spection, and the seal or stamp of the consular 
or medical officer of the United States. All 
baggage that has been disinfected shall bear a 
yellow label, upon which shall be printed the 
name of the port, the vessel upon which 
the baggage is to be carried, the word 
"Disinfected" in large type, the date of 
disinfection, and the seal or stamp of the con- 
sular or medical officer of the United States. 
It is understood, and it will bo so printed on 
the blank, that the label is not valid unless 
bearing the consular or medical officer's stamp 
or seal. 

Section 17. — Each steerage passenger shall 
be furnished with an inspectioncard, asfoUows. 
This card, stamped by the consular or medical 
officer, is to be issued to every member of a 
family as well as to the head thereof, and shall 
be in the following form: 

INSPECTION CARD. 

(Immigrants and Steerage Passengers.) 
Port of departure . Date of depart- 
ure . 

Name of ship . Last permanent resi- 
dence . 

Name of immigrant . 



Inspected and 
passed at 



(Seal or stamp of 
consular or med- 
ical officer) 



Passed at quaran- 
tine, port of 



Canal Zone (or) 



Republic of Pan- 
ama 



(Date) 



Vaccinated 
(Signature 
or stamp) 



(The following to be filled in by ship's sur- 
geon or agent prior to or after embarkation.) 

Ship's list or manifest . No. on 

ship's list or manifest . 



Berth 
No. 



Steamship inspection. 
Days. 



1st. 2, 3, 4. 5, 6, 7, 8. 
9, 10. 11, 12, 13. 14. 



To be punched by 
ship's surgeon at 
daily inspection. 



Section 18. — Passengers and crews, mer- 
chandise and baggage, prior to shipment at a 
noninfected port, but coming from an infected 
locality, should be subject to the same restric- 
tions as are imposed at an infected port. 

LOCAL INSPECTION OF VESSELS. 

Section 19. — Vessels arriving at any of the 
ports of the Canal Zone or the cities of Panama 
and Colon, Republic of Panama, under the 
following conditions, shall be inspected by 
the quarantine officer of the port prior to 
entry: 

(a) Vessels from the United States; (6) 
Vessels from foreign ports; (c) Vessels with 
sickness aboard; (d) Vessels from Panama- 
nian ports where any quarantinable disease 
prevails; (e) Vessels from Panamanian ports 
carrying passengers or articles suspected by 
the quarantine officer as being capable of con- 
veying the infection of a transmissible disease. 

Section 20. — The limits of anchorage of 
vessels awaiting inspection and of vessels 



October 8, 1913. 



THE CANAL RECORD 



59 



undergoing quarantine, shall be fixed from 
time to time by the Chief Sanitary Officer 
of the Canal Zone. 

Section 21. — Every vessel subject to quar- 
antine inspection shall be considered in 
quarantine until granted free pratique, and 
such vessels shall fly a yellow flag from the 
foremast head from sunrise to sunset and 
shall observe all the other requirements of 
vessels actually quarantined. 

Section 22. — The captain or master of a 
vessel in quarantine shall allow no com- 
munication with his vessel except as provided 
for in these regulations, nor shall any water 
craft approach within 200 meters of any such 
vessel. 

Section 23. — No person or article shall be 
allowed to leave a vessel in quarantine with- 
out written authority from the quarantine 
officer. 

Section 24. — Towboats, or any vessel or 
boat having had communication with a vessel 
in quarantine shall be submitted, with their 
personnel, to such measures of sanitation as 
the quarantine officer may judge to be nec- 
essary. 

Section 25. — No person, except such officers 
of the port as are required to do so by the 
nature of their duties, and the agent of the 
vessel, if such agent has the consent of the 
quarantine officer, shall go aboard any vessel 
subject to quarantine until such vessel has 
been granted free pratique. Any person going 
aboard prior to the issuance of free pratique 
shall be subject to the same restrictions as the 
personnel of the vessel, if, in the opinion of 
the quarantine officer, this is necessary for 
the protection of the public health. 

Section 26. — The quarantine officer, after 
his inspection of the vessel and its documents, 
shall decide whether said vessel, or its person- 
nel, or passengers, or any article aboard said 
vessel is liable to convey any of the following 
diseases: Plague, yellow fever, cholera, small- 
pox, typhus fever, or leprosy; and if so, 
such vessel shall be placed in quarantine and 
forbidden entry until the period of incubation 
of such diseases is past, and he shall take 
such measures in respect to the vessel, its 
passengers or personnel or cargo as, in his 
judgment, may be required to prevent the 
entry of such diseases into the Canal Zone 
or the cities of Panama or Colon, Republic 
of Panama. 

Section 27. — Passengers boarding vessels 
from ports subject to quarantine will be re- 
quired, in the discretion of the Chief Sani- 
tary- Officer of the Canal Zone, to present 
personal certificates from the officer author- 
ized bythese regulations to signbillsof health, 
certifying to their sanitary history and con- 
dition, provided due notice has been issued 
to the agents of the steamship companies on 
the Isthmus of Panama. 

Section 28. — E^-ery case of sickness aboard 
any vessel in the harbor shall be immediately 
reported by the master of the vessel to the 
quarantine officer, who shall see the case 
and take such sanitary measures as may be 
necessary. 

Section 29. — The Chief Quarantine Officer 
shall have charge of the sanitation of the 
harbors and vessels lying therein and shall 
see that such measures are enforced as are 
necessary for the proper hygiene of vessels, 
their cargoes, and their personnel, whether 
in port or en route, and to prevent the vessels 
from being a source of danger to other vessels 



or to the port, and he is authorized to certify 
bills of health to vessels clearing from ports 
under his jurisdiction, setting forth in such 
bill of health the conditions of the port, 
vessel, cargo, passengers, and crew; and is 
authorized at the request of the master of 
any vessel to disinfect and otherwise place 
such vessel in a sanitary- condition so that it 
may leave the port in free pratique and be able 
to make entry at the port of destination with- 
out further disinfection or detention in quar- 
antine. 

Section 30. — The quarantine officer shall 
make such charges for the disinfection of 
vessels and their cargoes, and for the transpor- 
tation and subsistence of passengers -n-hile in 
quarantine as may be fixed from time to time 
by the Governor of the Canal Zone. 

Section 31. — A certificate from the quaran- 
tine officer that a vessel has complied with all 
the quarantine regulations shall be required 
of every vessel subject to inspection, as a 
pre-requisite for customs entry or passage 
through the Canal. 

Section 32. — Quarantine stations shall be 
established and maintained at -such places 
as may be decided upon by the Chief Sani- 
tary Officer of the Canal Zone, with the ap- 
proval of the Governor. 

Persons detained in quarantine under these 
regulations shall not be permitted to go out- 
side the limits of the quarantine station until 
discharged therefrom by the quarantine 
officer and if any such person shall leave the 
quarantine station without being duly dis- 
charged therefrom he may be taken into 
custody by the quarantine officers wherever 
found and returned to the quarantine station 
and, in addition, he may be punished as here- 
inafter described. 

No person except the Chief Sanitary Officer 
of the Panama Canal or his representative, 
the quarantine officers and employes and 
personnel of the station shall be permitted 
to enter in or upon a quarantine station with- 
out permission from the Chief Sanitary Officer 
or the Chief Quarantine Officer of the Panama 
Canal. 

Section ii. — The Governor of the Panama 
Canal may establish from time to time such 
rules and regulations as he may deem neces- 
sary to execute this Order. 

Section 34. — Any person violating any of 
the provisions of these regulations shall be 
punished by a fine not exceeding S500, or by 
imprisonment in jail not exceeding 90 days, 
o£ both, at the discretion of the Court. 

Section 35. — The medical officers of the 
Canal Zone, duly clothed with authority to 
act as quarantine officers at any port or place 
within the Canal Zone and the ports of the 
cities of Panama and Colon, Republic of 
Panama, and when performing the said duties, 
are hereby authorized to administer oaths 
and take declarations thereunder in matters 
relating to the administration of the quaran- 
tine laws and regulations of the Canal Zone 
Government. 

Section 36.- — These regulations shall take 
effect from and after the date upon which the 
Panama Canal is officially and formally 
opened for use and operation, by proclamation 
of the President of the United States. 

WooDROw Wilson. 
The White House, 
April 15, 1913. 

[No. 1761.] 



JOINT LAND COMMISSION. 

Additional Awards. 

The following additional awards have 
been made by the Joint Land Commission: 

Award No. 32 — In the matter oj rfrtain houses in 
Gorgona — The evidence before the Commission shows 
that the persons hereinafter named received the iiousea 
herein referred to under the will of Juliana Miranda de 
Leon, who died in 1909. and who became the owner of 
the houses before she accepted a lease from the Isth- 
mian Canal Commission. In no case did the persona 
hereinafter named make any claim to the ownership of 
the land. 

In conformity with the principles formulated in the 
opinion of July 25, 1913. on the demurrer of counsel 
of the United States to the jurisdiction of the Comrats- 
sion in the matter of the claim of Juan Sotillo, and in 
accordance with the evidence submitted to the Com- 
mission, an award is hereby made against the United 
State? of America for ccrtam buildings hereinafter 
identified by the respective ta.x numbers, the said award 
to include all rights, claims, and interests of any persons 
in the said buildings, together with, all claims for 
improvements of whatsoever nature on, the part of any 
persons hereinafter named, and all rights claimed by 
them, in the sum of $2,450. 

This award shall be paid to the respective persons 
named hereinafter, in the amounts hereinafter specified, 
on or before ,the Xth day of October. 191.5, and if 
payment or tender of payment of any of the items of 
this award is not made on or before that date, such 
items shall thereafter bear interest at the rate of six 
per centum per annum until paid. 

To Jose L. Larrea. docket No. 496. for House 823, 
the sum of $450. To the owners of House 771. the 
sum of S2,0U0. to be divided among the owners for 
their respective portions of the said house, as follows: 
Juana Miranda V.deSayas. docket No. 1.630, the sum 
of $1,350, Mercedes Larrea de Bernard, the sum of 
• $650. Total, $2,450. 

(Signed) Federico Bo-ro. Roland P. Falkner, 
Samuel Lewis. L. S, Rowe. Cammtsstoners. 

September 9, 1913. 



Award No. 33 — In the matter o] the claim of Alfred 
Cadet, and the estate of George Andrade. deceased, for 
improvements located on the lands of Juan Grande — The 
evidence in this case shows that the property occupied 
by the late George Andrade and Alfred Cadet on the 
lands of Juan Grande was purchased by them from 
D. T. McLean, and that McLean entered upon these 
lands under a lease granted by the Isthmian Canal Com- 
mission, by the terms of which lease no compensation 
could be claimed from the United States of .'America on 
the cancellation of the same. 

The evidence shows, however, that a certain portion 
of the improvements made by Andrade and Cadet were 
not on the public lands of the United States, but upon 
the land owned by Luz Espinosa. and it is for this por- 
tion of the improvements that the award of the Com- 
mission is made. The evidence before the Commission 
shows that the late George Andrade was the owner of 
two-thirds of the property, and that Alfred Cadet was 
the owner of one-third. _ 

On the basis of the evidence presented, an award is 
hereby made against the United States of America in 
favor of the persons hereinafter named for the settle- 
ment of all rights, claims, or other interests in all grow- 
ing crops, fruit trees, buildings, and all other improve- 
ments of whatever kind, and all rights claimed by them 
on the estate of Juan Grande, in the sum of $400. 
The conditions of the award are; 
Firi/— This award shall be paid to the respective 
claimants hereinafter named in the amounts hereinafter 
specified on or before the 15th day of October. 1913. 
and if payment or tender of payment of any of the items 
of this award is not made on or before that date such 
items shall thereafter bear interest at the rate of six 
per centum per annum from date until paid. 

Second — The above mentioned award shall be dis- 
tributed among the claimants hereinafter named, and 
the amounts to be received by each shall be. as follows: 
Nome. Amount. 

Alfred Cadet $133.33 

W. H. Carrington. as administrator of the 

estate of George Andrade. deceased $266.67 

(Signed) Federico Bcro, Roland P. Falkner. 
Samuel Lewis, L. S. Rowe. Commisstcmers. 
September 13, 1913. 



Award No. 34 — In the matter of houses Nos. 713, 
719. SOS, and SI3 in the town of Gorgona — On July 19, 
1913, Maria T. de Bosque filed with the Joint Com- 
mission a claim (Docket 1.460) for a certain interest 
in Houses 713. 719. 808. and 813' in the town of 
Gorgona. which houses appear in the various records, 
pertaining thereto as the property of Hilario V. Seixas. 
Subsequently, on July 24. 1913, Seixas filed a claim. 



60 



THE CANAL RECORD 



Vol. VII, No, 7. 



(Docket 1.550) for the value of these houses. In a 
letter of the attorney of Seixas to the Collector of 
Revenues, dated February I. 1908. the location and 
history of these houses is given, as follows: 

"House No. 51. situated on l«t No. 5, block 
No 2, consists of a two-story frame and corrugated 
iron roof building, measuring 10 by 10 meters, the 
upper floor of which is occupied by the owner. 
H V Seixas. as his domicile and the first floor by 
the Panama Banking Company, at an annual 
rental of $600 U. S. currency. This house was 
originally built in 1887 and was purchased by the 
present owner in 1894. It is bou«ded on the east 
by a government, building, on the west by the 
main street, on the north by a building of one 
Garido. and on the south by July's building. 

House No. 55. situated on lot No. 2. block No. 
6 consists of a two-story frame and corrugated 
iron roof building. 16 by 17 meters, and is occupied 
at an annual rental of S840 U. S. currency. This 
property has been in the continuous possession of 
the present owner since 1886. and is bounded on the 
east by the main street, on the west by a building 
belon<^ing to Seixas. on the north by the house of a 
Chinaman, and on the south by a similar building. 
House No. 70. situated on lot No. 7. block No. 

5 consists of a two-story frame and corrugated iron 
roof building, measuring 12 by 15 meters. This 
lot was obuined from the municipality of Gorgona 
in 1906 for the purpose of erecting a building, and 
was purchased by the present owner in 1907. It 
is now occupied at an annual rental of $1,030 U. b. 
currency, and is bounded on the east by the street, 
on the west by a vacant lot, on the north by the 
house of one McCalla. and on the south by the 
building of N. Barsallo. 

House No. 73, situated on lot No. 18. block No. 

6 consi-^ts of a two-story frame and corrugated iron 
roof building, measuring 12 by 12 meters, and is 
occupied at an annual rental of $900 U.S- currency. 
This property has been in the continuous posses- 
sion of the present owner since 1886 and the build- 
ing was erected In 1905. It is bounded on the east 
by a house belonging to Seixas. on the west by a 
building of one Passaje Miranda, on the north by 
the property of the owner, and on the south by 
the street." 

It seems that Seixas refused to sign the lease issued 
by the Isthmian Canal Cominisson. On January 7, 
1908. the Collector of Revenues, in a letter to H. V. 
Seixas. made the following statement: 

"You are in possession and occupying certain 
lots in the town of Gorgona, which are the property 
of the Isthmian Canal Commission. I am advised 
by Mr. Robinson, district tax collector, that you 
have refused to sign leases for this property. I 
have therefore to advise you. if it is not your in- 
tention to sign leases as provided for by the 
Government of the Canal Zone for property that 
you are occupying it will be necessary for me to 
take steps at once to have you evicted from the 
property referred to." 

Nofurtheraction was taken until July 12.1909. when 
the assistant attorney for the Isthmian Canal Com- 
mission wrote the following letter to SeLxas: 

"Ancon. July 12. 1909. 
Dear Sir: 

On April 2. 1909, Mr. Grover C. Bradford, dis- 
trict tax collector, wrote you relative to the four 
lots occupied by you in Gorgona. Canal Zone, 
upon which is situated houses Nos. 51. .SS. 70. and 
73. He notified you that unless you signed leases 
to these lots on or before the lOth of April, it would 
be necessary for the Canal Zone Government to 
bring suit for the possession of these lots. 

This is to further notify you that unless you 
sign leases to these loU on the regular forms re- 
quired by the Government of the Canal Zone on 
or before the 25th day of July. 1909, and pay the 
back land rent, the Government of the Canal Zone 
will take such steps as may be necessary to secure 
possession of these lots and to collect the back 
land rent due thereon since April 15. 1907. up to 
April 15, 1909. as foQows: Lot No. 73. $26.40 per 
annum. 2 yeara. $52.80; lot No. 70, $32.25 per 
annum. 2 years. $64.50; lot No. 55. $35.75 per 
annum, 2 years. $71.50; lot No. 51. $19.12 per 
annum. 2 years, $38.24. Total. $227.04. 
Very truly yours. 

(Signed) W. K. Jackson, 
Assistant Attorney for I. C. C." 
Under date of July 29. 1909. the district tax collector. 
Mr. Grover C. Bradford, in writing to the attorney of 
Seixas. makes the following statements: 

"The form of lease enclosed is the one that was 
used at the time the municipalities were abolished, 
and have been in use ever since that time, and it 
seems to me that the case of Mr. Seixas should be 
governed in accordance with the existing circum- 
stances at the time the above mentioned form was 
put in use. which was about April 1, 1907. I know 
that you will say that you want a contract wherein 
something is promised or agreed to by the Govern- 
ment in the way of a compensation, should the lands 
be required for Canal purposes, but in all previous 
■cases of this nature these matters have been placed 
"before a commission to decide on what the proper- 
ty owner should receive as a compensation, and I 
^believe that this same procedure will be followed 
in the future aad that the Government will consider 
-any just claim." 

The continued refusal of Seixas to iign any leases 
led to the inatltutioa of a suit for unlawful detainer on 



August 14. 1909, in the District Court of the District 
of Gorgona. Judgment was rendered by the District 
Court in favor of the United States. The further pro- 
ceedings in the case are fully described in the answer of 
the United States to the claim of Hilario Seixas filed 
July 26. 1913. as follows: 

"Judgment was rendered by said District Court 
in favor of the United States of America; that an 
appeal was taken therefrom by the defendant Seix- 
as to the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Cir- 
cuit of the Canal Zone at Empire; that upon a 
trial de novo of all the issues involved in said action 
on December 2 1 , 1909, a judgment was rendered by 
the judge of that Court in favor of the United 
States of America for the sum of S268.67 and costs 
and directed that a writ of restitution issue for the 
lots or parcels of land in the Administrative 
District of Gorgona occupied by the said Seixas; 
that thereafter said Seixas prayed a writ of cer- 
tiorari from the Supreme Court of the Canal Zone 
in order that the judgment of the Circuit Court 
of the Canal Zone might be reviewed and reversed; 
that the Supreme Court of the Canal Zone on Sep- 
tember 7, 1910, rendered an opinion refusing to 
issue the writ of certiorari prayed for; that there- 
after SeUas secured an alternative writ of man- 
damus from the Supreme Court of the Canal Zone, 
directing that cause be shown why the full record 
and judgment of the Circuit Court of the Second 
Judicial Circuit of the Canal Zone should not ba 
sent to the Supreme Court for their review and re- 
versal; that upon motion to quash the alternative 
writ of mandamus issued by the Supreme Court, 
in an opinion fiJed at the November term of the 
Supreme Court of the Canal Zone, it was directed 
that the alternative writ be quashed and the pe- 
tition for mandamus dismissed, with the costs 
against said Seixas; that the decision of the Su- 
preme Court of the Canal Zone was duly certified 
to the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit 
of the Canal Zone and that on January 9. 1912, 
a writ of possession was issued from said Circuit 
Court and possession of the said four building loi-s 
and houses thereon within the town of Gorgona 
given to the United States of America by the mar- 
shal of the Canal Zone in accordance with said 
writ of restitution and order of the Second Judicial 
Circuit of the Canal Zone." 

It appears, therefore, that Seixas remained in pos- 
session of the property until January 9, 1912. when the 
writ of possession was finally issued by the Circuit 
Court, and possession taken by the marshal of the 
Canal Zone. 

The evidence before the Commission clearly shows 
that Seixas was in possession of these lots many years 
prior to American occupation. In accordance with the 
rule laid down by the Commission in tlie opinion on the 
demurrer to the jurisdiction of the Commission in the 
case of Juan Sotilla. the claimant was entitled to the 
protection of Article 5 of Law No. 50 of 1S94, and nei- 
ther the acceptance of an Isthmian Canal Commission 
lease or license nor the refusal to accept the same de- 
prived him of this right. The conclusion reached by 
the Commission in this case does not in any way affect 
or question the validity of the judgments of the Dis- 
trict Court of the Administrative District of Gorgona, 
the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit, or the 
Supreme Court of the Canal Zone. These judgments 
relate exclusively to the right of the United States of 
America to obtain possession of lands when a tenant 
thereon refuses to pay rental. In none of these pro- 
ceedings was the question of the right of Seixas to 
compensation for the value of his houses presented to 
the court. 

On October 12. 1909. the following judgment was 
entered by the District Court of the District of Gor- 
gona. to wit: 

*'That the plaintiff do have and recover of and 
from the defendant, the possession of lots Nos. 51. 
55. 70, and 73 situated in the town of Gorgona, 
Canal Zone, and that the plaintiff also do have and 
recover of and from the defendant the sum of S288.- 
72, and the cosis fixed at $6.30, United States 
currency." 

This judgment included arrears of rentals due to 
June 30, 1909, inclusive. 

In view of the fact that Seixas remained in possession 
of these houses until January, 1912. but has paid no 
rental for the lots since the 1st of July, 1907, the 
Commission decrees that from the total amount of the 
award the following sums be deducted: 

First — The sum of $295.02. representing the amount 
of judgment -entered against the said Hilario V. Seixas 
for arrears of rental to June 30, 1909. inclusive, to- 
gether with costs $295.02. . 

Second — Arrears of rental on lots Nos. 

51, 55, 70. and 73. from July 1. 1909 to 

January 1. 1912, a period of 2i years, to-wit: 

(a) Rent on lot No. 51. from July 1. 

1909, to January 1, 1912, 2 J years, at $19.- 

60 per year $49.00 

(&) Rent on lot No. 55. from July 1. 
1909. to January 1. 1912, 2i years, at $47.- 

70 per year $119.25 

(c) Rent on lot No. 70. from July 1, 
1909, to January 1. 1912, 2\ years, at 
$33.22 per year $83.05 



{d) Rent on lot No. 73, from July 1. 
1909. to January 1. 1912, 2J years, at 
$27.80 per year $69.50 



$615.82 

The valuation made by the Commission for the four 
houses for which claim has been made, is, as follows; 

1. House No. 55, tax No. 713, $1,200. 2. House No. 
51. tax No. 719, $450. 3. House No. 70, tax No. 813, 
$1,300. 4. House No. 73, tax No. 808, $1,100. Total. 
$4,050. 

From this total the following sums shall be deducted, 
to-wit : 

1. The sum of $295.02 in full satisfaction of the 
judgment entered against said Hilario V. Seixas for 
arrears of rentals to June 30. 1909, inclusive, together 
with costs. $295.02. 

2. For arrears of rental on lots Nos. 51, 55. 70, and 
73. from July 1. 1909. to January 1. 1912. $615.82. 

In accordance with the principles herein formulated 
and with the evidence submitted to the Commission, 
an award is hereby made against the United States 
of America to the owner of certain buildings identified 
by the tax Nos. 713, 719, 808, and 813. the said awards 
to include all right, title, and interest in the said build- 
ings, together with all claims for improvements of 
whatsoever nature, in the sura of $3,434.18 United 
States currency. 

This award shall be paid into the Circuit Court of 
the Second Judicial Circuit of the Canal Zone for dis- 
tribution among the owners of said buildings as their 
interests may appear, on or before the 20th day of Oc- 
tober. 1913. and if not so paid before that date it shall 
thereafter bear interest at the |rate of six per centum 
per annum until paid. 

(Signed) Federico Boyd, Roland P. Falknbr, 
Samuel Lewis, L. S. Rowe, Cotnmissioners. 

September 20. 1913. 



Award No. 36 — In the matter of the claim of Leo- 
poldo Cantoral for property located at Chagrecito. near 
uld Frijoles. docket No. 128. — The claim of Leopoldo 
Cantoral is divided into two parts; the first part refers 
to damages alleged to have been caused by the operat- 
ions of the Canal authorities in 1905; the second to 
damages caused by the rising of the waters of Lake 
Gatun in 1912. 

After careful consideration of all the evidence sub- 
mitted, the Commission has reached the conclusion 
that such evidence does not support any claim for 
damages alleged to have been suffered in 1905. 

With reference to the claim for damages suffered by 
reason of the rising of the waters of Lake Gatun. The 
evidence submitted in this case shows that the claim- 
ant, Cantoral, was for many years a tenant of the 
French Canal Company. All the leases issued by the 
French Canal Company contained the following 
clause: 

"In case the Company sells the land herewith 
leased, or recjuires it for any purpose of the Com- 
pany, no matter what such purpose may be, this 
contract shall be deemed rescinded. Notice of one 
month shall be sufficient, and shall be given to 
all lessees." 

It is evident, therefore, that upon the sale of the 
property of the French Canal Company to the United 
States, the relationship of landlord and tenant estab- 
lished between the French Canal Company and this 
claimant was terminated. It is true that the evidence 
submitted shows that there was a payment made in 
August. 1905, apparently under a mistaken impres- 
sion that the contract of lease which had expired by 
reason of the sale of the property by the French 
Canal Company to the United States of America, wai 
still in existence. 

From 1905 to 1912. the claimant remained in un- 
disturbed possession of the property without the pay- 
ment of any rental to the United States, and no at- 
tempt was at any time made to establish the relation 
of landlord and tenant. 

It is evident that this claimant became an occupier 
of public lands. The rights of such occupiers have 
been fully set forth by the Commission in an opinion 
dated July 25, 1913. Under the terms of this opinion 
such occupiers are entitled to the value of the cultl* 
vation on the land occupied by him. 

The Commission has. therefore, reached the con- 
clusion that this claimant is entitled to compensatioa 
for damages inflicted, and that the measure of such 
compensation is governed by Article V of Law No. 
48 of 1SS2. and Article 739 of the Civil Code. 

An award is therefore made against the United 
States of America to Leopoldo Cantoral for the settle- 
ment of all rights, claims, or other interests in al 
growing crops, fruit trees, and buildings, and all other 
improvements of every kind, situated in or near 
Chagresito. in the sum of $1,500 United States cur- 
rency. This award shall be paid to the aforementioned 
claimant in the amount specified, on or before the 20th 
day of October. 1913, and if payment or tender of pay- 
ment is not made on or before that date this item shall 



Octobtrg. 1913. 



THE CANAL RECORD 



61 



thereafter bear interest at the rate of six per centum 
per annum until paid. 

(Sgd.) Federico Boyd. Samuel Lewis. L. S. Rowe. 
Commissioners. Commissioner Falkner dissentin-];. 

September H), 1913. 



Award Nc. 37 — In the malter of sundry claims, docket 
No. 1,240- A, eU. — An award is hereby made against the 
United States of Amerir-a. in favor ot the perbons 
hereinafter named, in X.W. sum of $6,785 U. S. currency. 
This award shall be paid to the respective claimants 
hereinafter named in the amounts hereinafter specified 
on or before the 20tli day of October, 1913 , and if pay- 
ment or tender of pa;.mriit of any of the items of this 
award is not made on or before that date, auch items 
shnll thereafter ue^ir intortst at the rate of six per 
centum per annum until paid: 

Amaguer, Manricia, for all rights, claims, and 
other interests in growing crops, fruit trees, house 
tax No. 873 and any other buildings, and any other 
improvements which the said Mauricia Amaguer 
may possess or may have possessed on the lands 
of Juan, Grande (Waterloo), the sum of $60 U. S. 
currency. 

Alvarez. Jose, deceased. Estate of, docket No.3S0, 
for all rights, claims and other interests in grow- 
ing crops, fruit trees, buildings, and any other 
improvements which the said Alvarez may have 
possessed on the west side of the Chagres River on 
the lands known as Cafio Quebrado, in the sum 
of $175 U. S. currency. This award is subject to 
such equities, if any. as may be possessed by Jose 
Perdizor any other person clamiing an interest in the 
said property, and it is directed that the said 
award be paid into the Circuit Court of the Second 
Jjidicial District of the Canal Zone for distribution 
in accordance with the terms of this award. 

Ali'eo. Jose de Carmen, for all rights, claims, and 
other interests in growing crops, fruit trees, build- 
ings, and any other improvements which the said 
Alveo may possess or may have possessed at Gambi 
Hill, near the headwaters of the Bailamonos River. 
on public lands of the United States, the sum of 
$45 U. S. currency. 

Alveo, Manuel, docket No. 1,294, for all rights, 
claims, and other interests in growing crops, fruit 
trees, buildings, and any other improvements 
which the said Alveo may possess or may have 
possessed at Balboa Hill, near the headwaters of 
the River Maquenque. the said property being 
distinct from that located at Bailamonos Arriba, 
for which an award was made by the Joint 
Commission to another claimant of the same name, 
the sum of $125 U. S. currency. 

Alveo, Manuel, for all rights, claims, and other 
interests in growing crops, fruit trees, buildings, 
and any other improvements which the said 
Alveo may possess or may have possessed in the 
region known as Bailnmonos Arriba, the said prop- 
erty being distinct from that located at Balboa 
Hill, for which an award was made by the Joint 
Commission to another claimant of the same 
name, the sum of $290 U. S. currency. 

Ayarza. Nicolas, docket No. 1,607 , for all rights, 
claims, and other interests in growing crops, fruit 
trees, house tax No. 914. and any other buildings 
and any other improvements which the said 
Ayarza may possess or may have possessed on the 
lands of Juan Grande (Waterloo), and not includ- 
ing claims of said Ayarza for property said to be 
covered by Dump 4. the sum of %15 U. S. currency. 
Batista. R. Manuel, dockets Nos. 376 and 377 , for 
all rights. claim.s. and other interests in growing 
crops, fruit trees, buildings, and any other im- 
provements which the said Batista may possess 
or may have possessed in lands lying between 
the rivers Agua Salud and Aujeta, and which the 
said Batista may have possessed in the region 
designated as Juan Maria, near Tabernilla. the 
property covered by this award being distinct from 
that owned by another person by the name of 
Manuel Batista, located at La Loma, Frijoles. and 
purchased by the United States, in the sum of 
$300 U. S. currency. 

Betancourt, Damaso, dockets Nos. 1 ,638 and 1 ,639 , 
for all rights, claims, and other interests in growing 
crops, fruit trees, buildings, and any other im- 
provements which the said Betancourt may possess 
in two properties located near the headwaters of 
the river Maquenque, in the sum of $120 U. S. 
currency. 

Bilorio. Jose, for all rights, claims, and other 
interests in growing crops, fruit trees, buildings, 
and any other improvements which the said Bilorio 
may possess or may have possessed at points west 
of Mile 231 and Mile 21 J. respectively, on the Panama 
raiirojd line on th.^ lands of Barbacoas, the sum of 
S75 U. S. currency, 

Bolano, Roman, for all rights, claims, and other 
interests in growing crops, fruit trees, buildings. 



and any other improvements which the said 
Bolano may possess or may have possessed at 
Baldo Espino on the lands of Trxbernilla. together 
with any claims for property destroyed in 1907 on 
the lands of Tabernilla by the making of Taber- 
nilla dump and the overflowing of the land, the 
sum of $300 U. S. currency. 

Caballero, Jose Modesto, docket No. 786, for all 
rights, claims, and other interests in growing crops, 
fruit trees, buildings, and any other improvements 
which the said Caballero may possess or may have 
possessed on the lands of Cano Quebrado, the sum 
of S600 U. S. currency. 

Concepcion (Concession), Pedro, in docket No. 1,- 
4-/-/ for all rights, claims, and other interests in grow- 
ing crops, fruit trees, buildings, and any other im- 
provements which the said Concepcion may pos- 
sess or may have possessed on lands located above 
the 87-foot contour line, on the lower waters of the 
River Cafio Quebrado on the lands of Caho Que- 
brado. this property being distinct from that lying 
below the 87-foot contour line in the same locality, 
which was purchased from Concepcion by the 
United States in December. 1911. and being dis- 
tinct also from property on the upper waters of the 
River Cafio Quebrado. for which an award was 
made by the Joint Commission, the sum of $20 
U. S. currency. 

Concepcion {Concession), Pedro, in docket No. 1 ,- 
444, for all rights, claims, and other interests in 
growing crops, fruit trees, buildings, and other im- 
provements which the said Concepcion may possess 
on lands located above the 87-foot contour line on 
the upper waters of the River Caiio Quebrado on the 
lands of Cano Quebrado, this property being dis- 
tinct from that on the lower waters of the Caiio 
Quebrado, of which the part lying below the 87- 
foot contour line was purchased by the L'nited 
States in December. 1911. and of which the part 
lying above the S7-foot contour line is included in 
an award made by the Joint Commission, the sum 
of $50 U. S. currency. 

Dennis, Edward, docket No. 1,531. for all rights, 
claims, and other interests in growing crops, fruit 
trees, house tax No. 1,871, and any other buildings, 
and any other improvements which the said Dennis 
may possess or may have possessed at Caimito. 
the sum of $100 U. S. currency. 

Doxey, Pascual, docket No. 1,089, for all rights, 
claims, and other interests in growing crops, fruit 
trees, buildings, and any other improvements 
which the said Doxey may possess on lands lying 
on both banks of the Quebrado Pico, and located 
partly within the estate of Juan Grande (east 
bank of the Chagres River) and partly within the 
estate of Mamey y Culo Seco. the sum of $105 
U. S. currency. 

Fernandez. Juan Galeano. for all rights, claims, 
and other interests in growing crops, fruit trees, 
house tax No. S7S, and any other buildings, and 
any other improvements which the said Fernandez 
may possess or may have possessed on the lands 
of Juan Grande (Waterloo), the sum of $50 U. S. 
currency. 

Flores, Pablo, docket No. 1,366, for all rights, 
claims, and other interests in growing crops, fruit 
trees, buildings, and any other improvements 
which the said Flores may possess or may have 
possessed on the lands of San Pablo and Cano Que- 
brado above the 87-foot contour line (this prop- 
erty being distinct from that lying below the 87- 
foot level, which was purchased from the claimant 
by the United States in 1911). the sura of $215 
U. S. currency. 

Garcia, Santiago, docket No. 1,513. for all rights, 
claims, and other interests in growing crops, fruit 
trees, buildings, and any other improvements 
which the said Garcia may possess or may have 
possessed on the lands of Cafio Quebrado above 
the 87-foot contour line (this property being dis- 
tinct from that located below the 87-foot contour 
line, which was purchased from the claimant by 
the United States in 1911). the sum of $30 U. S. 
currency. 

Gutierrez, Martin, for all rights, claims, and other 
interests in growing crops, fruit trees, buildings, 
and any other improvements which the said 
Gutierrez may possess or may have possessed on 
the lands of Juan Grande (Waterloo), the sum 
of $85 U. S. currency. 

Herrera. Cornelia, docket No. 1,629, for all rights, 
claims, and other interests in growing crops, fruit 
trees, buildings, and any other improvements 
which the said Herrera may possess or may have 
possessed on the lands of Caiio Quebrado above 
the 87-foot contour line (this property being dis- 
tinct from that below the 87-foot contour line which 
was purchased from the claimant by the United 
States in 1911), the sura of $10 U. S. currency. 

lluie, J. R., docket No. 346. for all rights, claims. 



and other interests in growing crops, fruit treci, 
buildings, and any other improvements which the 
said Huie may possess or may have possessed at 
Agua Salud. including any claim for property which 
may have been destroyed at Baldo Espino in the 
work of constructing the relocated line of the 
Panama railroad, the said property being dis- 
tinct from that located at Buena Vista, which was 
said to have been in the name of the mother of 
claimant, E. Campbell, and which was purchased 
by the United States, the sum of $135 U. S. cur- 
rency. 

Jaratnillo, Juan, for nil rights, claims, and other 
interests in growing crops, fruit trees, buildings, 
and any other improvements which the said Jara- 
millo may possess or may have possessed at two 
places on or near the River Paja, on the lands of 
Caiio Quebrado, the sum of $60 U. S. currency. 
Lam, Lee. docket Nos. 882 and 1408. for all rights, 
claims and other interests in growing crops, fruit 
trees, houses tax Nos. 882 and 1793, and any other 
buildings and any other improvements which the 
said Lam may possess or may have possessed on 
the lands of Juan Grande (Waterloo) the sura of 
$500 U. S. currency. 

Maries, Damien, docket No. 241. for all rights, 
claims and other interests in growing crops, fruit 
trees, buildings, and any other improvements 
which the said Martes may possess or may have 
possessed on the lands of San Pablo near Quebrado 
Macho, in the sum of $170 U. S. currency. 

Modest, James, for all rights, claims and other 
interests in growing crops, fruit trees, buildings, 
and any other improvements which the said 
Modest may possess or may have possessed, on 
the public lands of the United States near Mile 
Post 19i of the Panama railroad, the sum of $100 
U. S. currency. 

Moran, Eliseo, for all rights, claims and other 
interests in growing crops, fruit trees, house tax 
No. 1798. and any other buildings, and any other 
improvements which the said Moran may possess 
or may have possessed in the lands of Juan Grande 
(Waterloo) and not including claim of said Moran 
for property said to be covered by Dump 4, the 
sum of $40 U. S. currency. 

Moran, Fermin, docket No. 1512, for all rights, 
claims and other interests in growing crops, fruit 
trees, buildings, and any other improvements which 
the said Moran may posses'! or may have possessed 
near the Rio Canito on the public lands adjoining 
the lands of Cano Quebrado and San Pablo, the 
sum of $450 U. S. currency. 

Moran, Isidoro. docket No. 1514. for all rights, 
claims and other interests in growing crops, fruit 
trees, buildings, and any other improvements 
which the said Moran may possess or may have 
possessed near the Quebrado Macho and the Rio 
Paja on the lands of San Pablo, the sum of $80 
U. S. currency. 

Moreno. Eufemio {Efigenio), docket No. 1509. 
for all rights, claims and other interests in growing 
crops, fruit trees, buildings, and any other im- 
provements which the said Moreno may possess 
or may have possessed near the Rio Canito on 
public lands of the United States adjoining the 
lands of Cafio Quebrado and San Pablo, the sum 
of S180 U. S. currency. 

Munoz, Gervacio, in docket No. 747, for aU rights, 
claims and other interests in growing crops, fruit 
trees, buildings, and any other improvements 
which the said Munoz may possess or may have 
possessed on the Rio Paja, in the lands known as 
San Pablo and Cano Quebrado. the said property 
being distinct from that at Quebrado Macho, for 
which an award was made by the Joint Land Com- 
mission, the sum of $20 U. S, currency. 

Munoz, Gervacio. in docket A'o. 747. forall rights, 
claims and other interests in growing crops, fruit 
trees, buildings, and any other improvements 
which the said Murioz may possess or may have 
possessed on the Quebrado Macho in the lands 
known as San Pablo and Cano Quebrado. the said 
property being distinct from that at Rio Paja. for 
which an award was made by the Joint Land Cora- 
mission, the sum of $45 U. S. currency. 

Munoz. Majiuel. docket No. 348, for all rights, 
claims and other interests in growing crops, fruit 
trees, buildings, and any other improvements 
which the said Muiioz may possess or may have 
possessed at various places on the lands of Caiio 
Quebrado above the 87-foot contour line (this prop- 
erty being distinct from that below the S7-foot con- 
tour line within the lake area which was purchased 
from Munoz by the United States in 1911, and 
which property was included by the claimant in 
his statement before the Commission, but excluded 
by the Commission in making its award), in the 
sum of $155 U. S. currency. 

{To be Continued.) 



62 



THE CANAL RECORD 



Vol. VII, No. 7. 



SOCIAL LIFE OF THE ZONE. 



Annual Meeting of the Cristobal Woman's Club. 

The Cristobal Woman's Club began its 
seventh year at an adjourned annual meet- 
ing held at the Commission clubhouse on 
Wednesday afternoon, October 1. The an- 
nual meeting of the club was held on April 23, 
but at that time it was found impossible 
to elect officers, or to decide upon the ques- 
tion as to whether or not the club should con- 
tinue for another year, so an adjournment 
was taken. At the meeting on October 1, 
the following officers were chosen: 

President, Mrs. Thomas Edwin Brown, Jr.; 
first vice-president, Mrs. Frederick iVIears; 
second vice-president, Mrs. William Harri- 
son; recording secretar>', Mrs. John J. Mur- 
ray; corresponding secretary, Mrs. G. E. 
Whitney; treasurer, Mrs. Webster Morris. 

The program committee is composed of 
Mrs. William Harrison, chairman; Mrs. 
Frederick Mears, and Mrs. Charles Butters. 
Mrs. George Armiger is chairman of the 
house and social committee. The club 
will not be divided into departments this 
year, but will work on a more concentrated 
and general plan. The meetings will be 
held on the first and third Wednesdays in 
each month. For the first meeting in each 
month there will be a formal program, with 
a paper or lecture; the second meeting will 
be rather informal in character, with a pro- 
gram composed of short papers on topics 
of general interest, and the reading of these 
will be followed by a general discussion. The 
club will hold a social meeting as a welcome 
to the new members and officers on Wednes- 
day afternoon, October 15. 



undenominational organization the chief pur- 
pose of which will be the discussion of religious 
issues, cooperative planning of future efforts, 
and the study of missionary work in all fields 
and by all denominations. There are 10 
church societies of women in the Canal Zone, 
Panama, and Colon, with an approximate 
total membership of 200. Should such a fed- 
eration as is proposed be formed it would 
result in a strong permanent organization 
of American women for Christian effort. 
It is hoped that plans will be perfected, 
so that the meeting for organization may 
be held in November at the time of the an- 
nual visitation of Bishop Stuntz, the Method- 
ist bishop in charge of the work in Central 
and South America. 

The missionary society elected officers for 
1913-191-1 at its meeting on October 4, as 
follows: President, Mrs. Harry Compton; 
vice-president, Mrs. J. H. Stokoe; secretary, 
Mrs. C. H. Ports; treasurer, Mrs. Townsend. 
The committee on federation is composed of 
Mrs. Compton, Mrs. Stokoe, Mrs. Keyser, 
and Mrs. Ports. 



Proposed Federation of Canal Zone Christian 
Societies. 

The question of the organization of a 
federation of women engaged in Christian 
work was the principal topic of discussion 
at the monthly meeting of the Woman's 
Foreign Missionary Society of the Methodist 
Episcopal Church held in the church parlors 
on Saturday afternoon, October 4. The so- 
ciety adopted a resolution in favor of an 



Miscellaneous Church Notes. 

The Cristobal Voung Peoples' Society, in 
connection with the Union Church, has issued 
a card announcing the schedule of its meet- 
ings, with the subject of each program and the 
name of the leader, from September to De- 
cember 28. The meetings are held in the 
church every Sunday evening, beginning at 
7 o'clock. The public is cordially invited to 
attend. The following is the program for 
the ne.xt three months. 

October 12, favorite verses in the Epistles; 
leaders, Ruth Wilkins, Ruth Farrell, Julia 
Nielsen, Mary Verner. 

October 19, "How to make this the best 
year in our society's history;" leader, Mr. Ir- 
win DeLong. 

October 26, missionary essentials; leaders, 
Clara Matthews, William Eraser. 

November 2, "The ideal Christian;" lead- 
er, Mrs. M. F. Harrison. 

November 9, "Christian home life;" leader, 
Mr. B. L. Larcom. 

November 16, temperance factsand figures; 



PANAMA RAILROAD COMPANY. 



PANAMA-BALBOA LABOR TRAIN SERVICE— IN 


EFFECT OCTOBER 6, 191 


3. 




SOUTHWARD. 


Stations. 


81 83 


85 87 1 89 


91 


93 


95 97 ! 99 


101 1 103 


105 




A. M. |A. M. 


A. M. 1 A. M. 


A.M. 


A.M. 


P.M. 


P. M. 


P.M. P.M. 


P.M. 


P. M. 


P.M. 


Leave 

Panama 

Big Tree Cabin.. . 
Balboa Dock 


5.30 
5.35 
5.45 


6.10 
6.15 
6.25 


6.30 8.20 
6.35 8.25 
6.45 : 8.35 


9.25 
9.30 
9.40 


10.40 
10.45 
10.55 


12.10 
12.15 

12.25 


12.30 

12.35 
12.45 


1.10 
1.15 
1.25 


2.50 
2.55 
3.05 


4.30 
4.35 
4.45 


5.35 
5.40 
5.50 


7.30 
7.35 
7.45 




A.M. 


A.M. 


A. M. I A. M. 


A.M. 


A.M. 


P. M. 


P.M. 


r. M. P. M. 


P.M. 


P.M. 


P.M. 




81 


83 


85 ! 87 


89 


91 


93 


95 


97 1 99 


101 


103 


105 



NORTHWARD. 



Stations. 


80 


82 


84 


86 


88 


90 


92 i 94 96 


98 


100 


102 


104 


106 




A.M. 


A.M. 


A. M. 


A.M. 


A.M. 


A.M. 


A. M. P. M. P. M. 


P.M. 


P.M. 


P.M. 


P.M. 


P. M. 


Leave. 

Balboa Dock 

Big Tree Cabin... 
Panama 


5.30 
5.40 
5.45 


6.10 
6.20 
6.25 


7.00 
7.10 
7.15 


8.45 
8.55 
9.00 


10.20 
10.30 
10.35 


11.05 

11.15 
11.20 


11.15 12.50 2.30 
11.25 l.OOl 2.40 
11.30 1.05 2.45 


3.15 
3.25 
3.3(1 


5'^ 
5.15 
5,20 


5.15 
5.25 
5.30 


6.10 

6.20 
6.25 


8.20 




A.M. 


A.M. 


A. M. 


A.M. 


A.M. 


A.M. 


A. M. ' P. M. P. M. 


P. M. 


P. M. 


P.M. 


P.M. 


P. M. 




80 


82 


84 


86 


88 


90 


92 1 94 96 


98 


100 


102 


104 


106 



leaders. Swift Carpenter and W. T. Donohue. 

November 23, (Thanksgiving; "Discontent 
or praise;" leader, Mrs. Wm. Harrison. 

November 30, "The church at work for our 
country;" leader, F. F. Zundel. 

December 7, "The ideal Christian" (paper 
No. 2); leader, Mr. W. H. Fredericks. 

December 14, lessons from the men and 
women of the Bible ; leaders, Arthur Farrell 
and Sara Harrison. 

December 21, "The Christian spirit and how 
it may prevail;" leader, Mr. A. J. Bowers. 

December -28, "The church at work for the 
world;" leaders, Minot Cotton, Etha Beving- 
ton, Ray Appleton, Elizabeth Ragsdale. 

The Woman's Altar Society and the Men's 
Catholic Club of St. Ferdinand's Church, 
Empire, combined in giving a reception at 
the parish house on Saturday evening, Septem- 
ber 27, in honor of the Reverend Father J. 
McDonald, C. M., who is to take charge of 
the parish and church work during the absence 
on vacation leave of the Reverend Father 
Allot. The reception was also a farewell to 
Father Allot who sailed on September 29. 

Farewell Banquet of Pedro Miguel Masonic Club. 

The Pedro Miguel Masonic Club held a 
disbanding banquet on October 4 in the 
Pedro Miguel hotel. The president, John 
Kane, was toast master. There were addresses 
by John A. Walker, M. L. French, Alma White, 
F. H. Whitney, J. W. Sweeney, and Dr Cur- 
ney. 

The club numbers among its members. 
Masons from 92 dilTerent lodges and 24 
states, as well as from England, Ireland, Scot- 
land, Canada, Mexico, Costa Rica, and Alaska. 

E. P. Matter represented Alexandria- 
Washington, No. 22, the lodge where "The 
Father of his Country" presided as master. 

One of the features of the evening was an 
address by Frank H. Whitney on "Forty-five 
years a Mason." 

The club was organized on June 8, 1909, 
being a continuation of the Paraiso Sojourners 
Club, and had always maintained a good 
membership, even after the advent of the 
various Masonic bodies on the Isthmus. 

The last officers were : President, John Kane; 
secretary, Ira M. Showers; treasurer, F. R. 
Curney; chaplain, Frank H. Whitney. 

Dances. 

The regular dance of the Cristobal Danc- 
ing Club will be held on Saturday, October 
11 at the clubhouse. Invitations or mem- 
bership cards must be presented at the door. 

A dance will be held at the Gatunclubhouse 
on October 11 under the auspices of Lock 
City Lodge, No. 5, Knights of Pythias, simi- 
lar to the one held in August. A charge will 
be made to cover the expenses. 

Fund for Providing an Artificial Leg. 

The subscribers to the fund raised for the 
purchase of an artificial leg for one Pablo 
Abello, employed as switchtender by the 
. Fifth Division at Miraflores, are advised that 
the amount collected ($80) has been turned 
over to the superintendent of Ancon Hos- 
pital and the leg will be fitted as soon as 
received from the manufacturers. 



Southward trains will have preference over northward trains. 
Trains stop at all stations, except No. 106. 

Baggage for Balboa steamship connections will be handled as far as possible by trains Nos. 87. 91, and 97. 
A labor train will leave Panama at 10.50 p. m., arrive Balboa Dock 1 1.05 p. m., returning, leave Balboa Dock 
11.15 p. m., arrive at Panama 11.30 p. m.. on nights when there is work at Balboa Dock. 
All trains daily, except 83, 90, 93. and 100, which are discontinued Sundays. 



In the list of the diplomatic and consular 
corps accredited to the Republic of Panama, 
published in The Canal Record of Septem- 
ber 10, the name of Mr. Daniel Rojas P., the 
Consul for Costa Rica at Colon was inad- 
vertently omitted. 



October 8, 1913. 



THE CANAL RECORD 



63 



OFFICIAL CIRCULARS. 



Appointment of Timekeeping Inspector. 

Culebra. C. Z., October6. 1913. 
Heads of Departments and Divisions: 

Mr. H. T. Bosse has been appointed timekeeping 
inspector. Fourth Division, and will be charged with 
the inspection of timekeeping work and the investi- 
gation of complaints and errors. 

He will be given any necessary cooperation by 
officials and employes. 

By direction of the Chairman. 

C. A. McIlvaine. 

Chief Clerk. 



Sunday Trips for Masters and Mates Through 
Culebra Cut. 

Cristobal. C. Z., October 6. 1913. 
To ALL Masters and Mates: 

The launch Margaret will be run through Culebra 
Cut from Gamboa dike to Cucaracha slide and return 
every Sunday (commencing October 12, 1913, if 
possible to put launch in Cut by that date), to afford 
masters and mates an opportunity to go over the 
course before dredging operations are started in that 
locality. 

The launch will leave Gamboa dike at 9 a. m.. re- 
turning in time for those from the Atlantic side to 
catch the 5.49 train to Colon, and those from the 
Pacific side the 5.57 train to Panama. Passes for this 
trip may be procured from W. G. Comber, resident 
engineer, Balboa, C. Z. 

W. G. Co^tBER. 
Resident Engineer. 



Sailing of the "Ancon.** 

Pana\lv R.\ilroad Company. 
Office of General Superintendent, 

Colon. R. P., October 6, 1913. 
Circular No. 226: 

All concerned — The sailing date of the steamer 
Ancott has been set for Monday, October 13, 1913, at 
3 p. m., from Pier 11, Cristobal, C. Z. 

J. D. Patterson, 
General Superintendent. 



Special Train. 

Panama Railroad Company, 
Freight and Passenger Department, 

Colon. R. P.. October 2. 1913. 
To Alt Concerned — For the benefit of those desiring to 
witness the performances of the Morton Opera Com- 
pany, special train will leave Panama 11.55 p. m., Tues- 
days and Thursdays. October 7, 9, 14. and 16. taking 
first-class passengers only for stations between Panama 
and Bas Obispo. J. C. Angel. 

Freight and Passenger Agent. 

. Labor Train Changes. 

Empire. C. 2.. October 1. 1913. 

To .All Concerned — Effective on the morning of Octo- 
ber 6, the BasObispo-Balboa labor train and the Eni- 
pire-Miraflorcs labor train will be consolidated; leav- 
ing Bas Obispo at 5.20 a. m. running over the Panama 
railroad main line to Balboa, making the necessary 
stops for the accommodation of men. 

Passes will not be required on this train as are re- 
quired at present on the Bas Obispo-Balboa labor 
train. 

On the same day. the short labor train which leaves 
Pedro Miguel at 5.47 a. m. for Balboa over the Panama 
railroad will be taken off and the labor train which 
leaves Paraiso at 6 a. m. and runs to Corozal only. 



will leave Paraiso at 5.45 a. m. and run through to 
Balboa. A. Sessions. 

Superintendent oj Transportation. 



Painting Retired Steel Dump Cars. 

Culebra, C. Z.. October 1, 1913. 
To All Concerned — The Chairman has approved rec- 
ommendation that good order steel dump cars, retired 
from service and turned over to the Quartermaster's 
Department for sale, be cleaned and given a coat of 
tar-cement paint, same to be applied with the paint- 
spray machine. 

The above in addition to provisions covered by 
Circular 323-e, as regards other classes of equipment. 
H. S. Tarish, 
Surveying Ojjicer. 



Misdirected Letters. 

Ancon, C. Z.. October 8. 1913. 
The following insufficiently addressed letters, origi- 
nating in the United States and its possessions, have 
been received in the office of the Director of Posts, and 
may be secured upon request of the addressees: 



Allen. Walter (papers) 
Barker. Arthur 
Bartlett. William 
Biddick. Ernest 
Carew. F. J. 
Carrol. J. F. 
Clark. W. C. 
Colemenares. A. S. 
Crowell. P. V. 
Daeggers. D. C. 
Ethrige. Mrs. S. B. 
Fenley. Mrs. M. D. 
Fleming. Jemmee 
Fueras. Adolfina 
Garten, C. A. 
Gough, Mrs. Mattie B. 



Hallin. F. W. 
Kerchner, W. G. 
Kulp. William D. 
Mayle. Charles E. H. 
McGowan. David 
Melhope, G. E. 
Messenger, C. P. 
Nelson. Wm. 
Nock. Ivan F. 
Pelekane. Aki 
Phillips. John E. 
Rawson, Frank 
Stevens, Mrs. Wra. 
Stewart, Mrs. Gilbert 
Taylor, Roscoe C. 
Thiele, R. (2) 

— — ♦ 

Supplies for the Canal. 

The following steamers, witri supplies for the Isth- 
mian Canal Commission and the Panama Railroad 
Company, arrived at the ports of Balboa, Colon, and 
Cristobal, during the week ending September 27: 

Prinz August Wilhclm, September 21, from New 
York, with 287 pieces pipe. 238 kegs bolts and nuts, 
one case lamps, for stock. 

Tivives, September 21 , from New York, with 30 boxes 
washers, for stock' 404 "1" beams. 32 cases maclnner>', 
59S pieces structural steel. 18 reels cable, for First 
Division. 

Carta^o. September 22, from New Orleans, with 727 
pieces lumber, for stock; 2,518 bundles lumber, for 
Fifth Division; 131 barrels fire clay. 'for stock; 1.332 
sacks creosoted blocks, S62 barrels brick, for Second 
Division. 

Panama. September 23. from New York, with 27 
cases stationery supplies, for stock; 13 cases castings, 
for First Division; 10 bundles derails, for Panama 
Railroad Company; 10 coils wire, for stock; five boxes 
transformers, for Mechanical Division; 200 bags lime, 
100 drums calcium carbide, for stock; 1,034 crates 
insulator?, for First Division; 315 ties, for Second 
Division; 4.000 bundles tie plates for stock; 19 casks 
tile, for First Division; 66 cases castings, for emergency 
dams; 304 steel plates, for permanent coaling plant. 
Cristobal; 257 bundles steel bars, for First Division; 
57 bundles galvanized sheets, for stock; 633 pieces 
structural steel, for First Division; and a miscellaneous 
cargo, the whole consisting of 7,607 pieces weighing 
656 tons. 

Nubian, September 23, from Liverpool, with 155 
barrels crude carbolic acid, for stock; 89 pieces dredg- 



WEATHER CONDITIONS, CANAL ZONE, sjEPTEMBER, 1913. 

The rainfall for the month was deficient at all stations except Ancon. Balboa. Empire. Monte Lirio. Gatun. 
and Brazos Brook. The monthly totals ranged from 6.75 inches at Camacho to 14.12 inches at Monte Lirio. 
The maximum precipitation recoided in one day was 3.26 inches at Monte Lir'O on the 5th. 

Approximately normal conditions of temperature, relative humidity, and atmospheric pressure prevailed 
during the month, while the cloudiness and wind movement were generally above normal. 

The usual conditions of night and early morning fogginess prevailed at the interior staions. The average 
number of nights with fog was 17. Forty-five per cent of the fogs observed were dissipated by 6.30 a. m., 92 per 
cent by 7.30 a. m.. and 100 per cent by 8.30 a. ra. 

The following table summarizes the weather conditions for the m^nth: 





Press're (reduc'd 
to mean of 24 
hours.) 


Temperature. 


a § 

ri 3 


Precipitation. 


Wind. 


Stations. 


s 


e 

s 
■a 


6 
CO 

a 


S 

3 

B 
'S 


1 
Q 


1 

,0 

i 

o 
H 


> 

n 


^1 

12 
2 

22 
26 
26 


Total move- 
ment (in 
miles). 


S.I 

H 

2. 


>, 

.J ■ 

II 


1 

U 

5 


n 
Q 


Colon. - 

Culebra 

Anoon 


29.83? 
29.822 
29.814 


80.2 

79.1 
79.6 


89 
91 
92 


Sep. 27 
Sep. 23 
Sept. 1 


73 Sept. 9 
70 Sept. 9 
69 Sept. 9 


88 
94 
91 


9.90 
10.55 
11.43 


1 2.47 

11.20 

7.69 


5,555 
4,043 
4,497 


S. E. 
N. W. 
N. W. 


27 
25 
25 


w. 

N. E. 

N. 


Sept. 3 
Sept. 24 
Sept. 28 



ing machinery, for SLxth Division. 

Ahangarez, September 25. from New Orleans, with 
13.516 pieces lumber, for various divisions; 50 mules, 
for stock; 1.192 sacks creosoted blocks, for Second 
Division. 

Aztec. September 26. from San Francisco, with 
6,844 pieces redwood lumber, 280 bundles redwood 
lumber, for administration building. 



Stages of the Chagres. 

Maximum height of the Chagres River for the week 
ending midnight, Saturday, October 4, 1913. All 
heights are in feet above mean sealevel. 





Stations. 


Day and Date. 


Vigia. 


1 

■3 
X! 


1 

O 


_*o 

Is 


5l 

63 


Sun., Sept. 28... 
Mon., Sspt. 29.. 
Tues., Sept. 30. . 
Wed., Oct. 1.... 
Thurs., Oct. 2... 

Fri.,Oct. 3 

Sat., Oct. 4 


126.6 
126.6 
128.0 
127.8 
129.6 
129.0 
129.0 


93.1 
93.0 
94.0 
94.0 
95.1 
95.1 
93.6 


65.6 

65 8 

66 
66 1 
66.3 
66.7 
66.9 


65 6 
65.7 
65 9 
66.1 
06.3 
66.6 
66.8 


65.6 

65 8 

66 
66 2 
66.4 
66 7 
66 g 


Height of low wa- 
ter to nearest foot 


125 


91.0 


44 







*Sluice gates in spillway at Gatun were dosed on 
June 27, 1913, with surfa:e of lake at elevation 48.25. 

^ 

Rainfall, Sept. t to Sept. 30, 1913, Inclusive. 



Stations. 


K a 




u 

■S-6 

n 


Pacific Section — 
Ancon 


Ins. 
2.78 
1.86 
1.42 
1.18 
1.73 

1.93 
2.24 
1 23 

1 27 
2.15 
1.88 
1.38 
2.22 

2 00 
3.26 

1.76 
1.80 
1.73 

3.25 


30 
8 
23 
24 
19 

8 
9 
8 

19 
6 

,'0 

19 
5 

19 
5 

29 
30 
30 
19 


Ins. 
11 43 






♦Miraflores 


8 92 




8 32 


Rio Grande 


8 95 


Central Section — 

Culebra 








Empire 


9 14 






*Tuan Mina 


8 22 


Alhajuela 

*E1 Vigia 


8.82 
7 so 








11 30 


♦Monte Lirio : 


14 12 


Atlantic Section — 




*Brazos Brook 


11 96 






^ Porto Bello. 


11 34 



^Standard rain gage — readings at 5 p.m., daily 
Automatic rain gage at unstarred stations — values 
midnight to midnight. 



September Rainfall for Three Years. 



Stations. 



Pacific Section- 

Ancon 

Balboa 

Miraflores. . . . 

Pedro Miguel.. 

Rio Grande.. . 
Central Section- 

Culebra 

Camacho 

Empire 

Gamboa 

Juan Mina 

Alhajuela 

£1 Vigia 

Frijoles 

Trinidad 

Monte Lirio... 
Atlantic Section- 

Gatun 

Brazos Brook,, 

Colon , . . 

Porto Bello... 



6.08 

8.66 
8.30 
8.31 
6.63 



' 4.33 
10.32 
11.62 
17.55 









13 






































< 


!l 


I9I2 


1913 


c 








o 








2 


S 






(fl 


>< 


8.38 


11.43 


7.69 


17 


10.01 


9.01 


6.94 


15 


14.45 


8.02 


10.62 


5 


10.76 


8.32 


8.81 


6 


15.10 


8.95 


10.93 


9 


14.12 


10,55 


11.20 


23 


14.14 


6.75 


10.56 


8 


13.78 


9.14 


8.39 


10 


12.75 


9.48 


10.47 


31 


14.27 


8.22 


10.35 


3 


9.12 


8.82 


11.41 


15 


10.10 


7.50 


11.90 


6 


11.93 


11.61 


11.77 


2 


11.36 


11.30 


12.05 


6 


9.39 


14.12 


12.44 


6 


7.84 


9.95 


9.73 


9 


9.11 


11.96 


11.62 


X 


12.23 


9.90 


12.47 


43 


15.03 


11.34 


13.28 


6 



>, 
Las 



26 
23 
24 
25 
22 

26 
21 

24 
24 
22 
21 
25 
22 
23 
19 

23 
25 
22 
27 



Married. 

COOK-HOWELL— At the Union Ckurch. Cris- 
tobal, on October 3, Miss Viola Elizabeth Howell of 
Round Hill, Va., to Mr. George Farnham Cook of Pal- 
myra. Me., the , Reverend Carl H. Elliott officiating. 
Canal Zone reaidence. Las Cascadas. 



64 



THE CANAL RECORD 



Vol. Vir No. 7. 



COMMISSION CLUBHOUSES. 



Activities of the Young Men*s Christian Associa- 
tion. 

GENERAL. 

The schedule for the regular moving picture ex- 
hibitions for the week October 13 to 18 is. as follows: 
Monday. Corozal; Tuesday. Cristobal; Thursday. 
Empire; Friday, Culebra and Porto Belle; Saturday, 
Gatun. 

Additional moving picture exhibitions this week 
and Monday of next, are. as follows: Monday, 
Gatun; Tuesday. Culebra; Thursday. Corozal; Fri- 
day, Cristobal; Monday, Empire. The films to be 
shown are three reels of the Panama Canal by Ed- 
ward H. Kemp of San Francisco, who has made several 
trips to the Isthmus for this purpose; also one reel of 
the Grand Canyon of Arizona by Mr. Kemp, and a 
multiple of three reels of "The wreck of the steamer 
Aurora". Regular rates of admission will be charged. 

The standing of the various teams in the Isthmian 
tournaments at the close of the week ending October 
4, follows: 

BASKETBALL LEAGl'E. 

TI'oK Lost Total. 

Gatun 2 .. .. 1.000 

Empire 2 .. .. 1.000 

Culebra 1 .. . . 1 000 

Camp Elliott .. 1 -- .000 

Cristobal . . 2 . . .000 

Corozal . . 2 . . .000 

BOWLING TOURNAMENT. 

Won Lost Total 

Cristobal 3 . . . . 1 .000 

Empire 3 .. .. 1.000 

Corozal 2 .. 1 .. .666 

Culebra 1 .. 2 .. .333 

Gatun .. 3 .. .000 

Camp EIHott . . 3 . . .000 

CHESS TOURNAMENT. 

Points W071, 

Cristobal 5 

Gatun 3 

COROZAL. 

The first basketball game of the Isthmian league 
was played with the Culebra team Wednesday night, 
October 1, with the following results: 

First half. Culebra 17, Corozal 11; second half, 
Culebra 0. Corozal 6; extra period. Culebra 2, Corozal 
0; final score. Culebra 19, Corozal 17. 

Culebra 's team was composed of the following play- 
ers: R. Purchase, forward and guard; Porter, forward; 
F- Purchase, center; Helper, guard and center; Koper- 
ski, guard; Cushing, forward. Corozal's team was, 
as follows: Sperber, forward; Carr. forward and center; 
Sonnenberg, center; Bessy, center and forward; 
Schaeffer, guard: Kenny, guard. Referee. Edwards. 
The games this week are with Camp Elliott on Wed- 
nesday night. October 8. and with Empire on Saturday, 
October 11. 

Corozal won two out of three games of tenpins in 
their first game of the Isthmian bowling league on 
Saturdav. October 4. by the following scores: 

Culebra 823 ... . 831 ... . 866 

Corozal 811 866 970 

The 200, or over, scores last week were made by Zil- 
ler. 222; King. 245 and 204; Davis. 243; Parkis. 216. 

The Corozal bowlers go to Cristobal on Saturday, 
October 11. 

The Corozal chess club has completed the tournament 
to decide the championship of Corozal. The results 

were : ■ 

Won Lost P. C. 

Sherrard 12 .... 2 ... .857 

Morehead 10 4 ... .714 

Shehan 9J. . . . 4J. .. .672 

Fields 8J.... 5|... .607 

Mills. 7 ... . 7 ... .500 

Kingsburj' 6 8 .... 428 

Kyte 3 .... 11 ... .214 

Whitehead .... 14 . . .000 

CULEB4U. 

The winners of the local tenpin bowling tournament 
recently closed were: First place. J. Guy DeCora and 
E. Paul Case; total pinfall for two games. 758. The 
high average and high score medals were won by F. F- 
Dougherty; high score, 267. 

The Empire bowling team will bowl the local team 
at Culebra on Saturday, October 11. 

The Culebra basketball team will play the Gatun 
team at Empire on Saturday night. October 11. 

Twenty-seven new books have been received and 
added to the library. 

The following high scores in duckpins were made 
recently: Silver. 103; R. Koperski, 136; Kiernan, 100, 
117. 101, 107. 106; Regan. 103. 106, 103; Palmer. 101. 
109; Case. 109; Comthwaite, 113; Herrington. F. E., 
119; Fitzpatrick. 103. 110. 

E.MPIRE. 

At the meeting of the Empire debating club held 



Friday, October 3, the subject was: "Resolve(^, that 
tlie United States should use milit3ry force to pacify 
Mexico" The speakers for the affirmative were Messrs. 
Morrison andSwanson; for the negative. Messrs. Beck- 
meycr and Dougherty. The judges decided in favor 
of the negative, after which the subject was open for 
discussion. The next meeting will be held on Friday. 
October 17. subject to be announced later. 

The opening game of tenpins between Empire and 
Camp Elliott was won by Empire. Scores: 

Empire 862 779 907 

Camp Elliott 744 679 736 

The basketball game played between Empire and 
Camp Elliott on Wednesday, October 1, was won by 
Empire by a score of 48 to 20. On Saturday, October 
11, Gatun will*play Culebra basketball at Empire. 

Prizes have been offered for the one making high 
score in tenpins and duckpins during the month of 
October. 

GATUN. 

The "Saturday night open house" held at Gatun 
clubhouse on October 4. was a success. Punch and 
cakes were served from a table in the center of the 
lobby and Meneeley. the pianist, entertained during 
the evening. The chief feature was the basketball game 
between Corozal and Gatun. wliich resulted in a 
victory for the home team; score, 20 to 15. 

The line-ups were, as follows: Gatun — Huber. for- 
ward ; Whiston. forward ; Fitzpatrick and Wright, 
centers; Mitchell and Fitzpatrick, guards; Conley, 
guard. Corozal — Sperber, forward; Bessey, forward; 
Carr, center; Shafer. guard; Kenney, guard. Fouls: 
Gatun, 6; Corozal, 3. Referee, Swanson of Empire, 
Timer, Ben Jenkins. Scorers, Foman. Gatun; Dwelle. 
Corozal. 

The result of the chess match, follows: 

Gatun Cristobal 

Brown 1 Hurt 1 

Byrne Taylor 1 

Logan 1 Tuttle 2 

Marquard 1 Wilson I 

Total 3 5 

Gatun lost all three games of bowling with Cris- 
tobal. The feature of the evening was C. V. Omeara's 
game of 253 pins: 



MOVEMENT OF OCEAN VESSELS. 



Gatun. 

Omeara .... 208 164 253 

Wall 162 1S2 153 

Hodges 144 148 127 

McCaulf'y. . 165 166 179 

Humphrey. . 159 172 166 



Cristobal. 

Barrett 151 167 213 

Barnum 174 150 171 

ColHns 123 154 187 

Barte 193 IQO 182 

Bullard 198 214 170 



Totals.... 838 832 878 839 875 923 

A special motion picture entertainment was held on 
Monday. October 6. when three reels showing the work 
on the Panama Canal were featured. 

Mrs. Wm. Trickcy now holds high score in duckpins, 
with 147 points. 

A medal will be given to H. E. Dewey for having 
won the pool match for the championship of the 
Isthmus. 

The Gatun basketball team has elected John 
J. Fitzpatrick captain for the season of 1913. 

C. \*. Omeara will be given a silver medal for having 
won ihe largest number of 200. or over, games of 
tenpins during the month of September. 

Gatun's basketball team will play with Culebra at 
Empire on Saturday. October 11. 

More new library books were ordered during the 
past week. 

CRISTOBAL. 

Mr. T. .A. Wehmeier. representing Cristobal, was de- 
feated by Mr. Dewey of Gatun in a pool match, on 
Tuesday. September 30, by the score of 247 to 300. 

Tlie opening game of the all-Isthmian basketball 
tournament on Wednesday, October 1. resulted in a vic- 
tor." for Gatun by the score of 28 to 8. Gatun was repre- 
sented by Messrs. Huber. Whiston. Fitzgerald, Con- 
nely, and L. Mitchell; Cristobal, by Messrs. Barcroft. 
Weller, Eraser, Simons, and Luce. 

Dr. J. B. RuiTo. chief surgeon of the Mexican Army 
under President Madero gave a talk on the present con- 
ditions in Mexico at the discussion club meeting on 
Thursday. October 2. 

The Empire basketball team defeated Cristobal by 
the score of 46 to 8 om Saturday night. October 4. 
The line-up was. as follows: Empire — Messrs. Sawyer, 
Johnson. Holdquist. Miller, Plank. Bartholomew, and 
Stevens; Cristobal — Messr.-. Moons. Simons, Ander- 
son. Winters. Barcroft. W. Eraser and D. Raymond. 

By bowling 237 pins. Mr. H. A. Collins received as 
prize, a box of cigars for the higest score at tenpins on 
the Cristobal alleys for the month of September. 

A married folks duckpin tournament was held on 
Tuesday, October 7, in honor of Mrs. J. W. Landers, 
who sails for the United States shortly. 

Corozal bowls at Cristobal on Saturday. October 11. 

The Culebra Y. M. C. A. chess team will play the 
Cristobal team in the All-Isthmian chess tournament 
at Cristobal on Saturday evening. October 11. All 
interested in chess are invited to attend and witness 
the game. 



The following is a list of sailings of the Panama 
Railroad Steamship L'ne; of the Royal Mail Steam 
Packet Company; of the Hamburg-American Line, 
and of the United Fruit Company's Line. 

NEW YORK TO CRISTOBAL.* 

Advance P. R. R. .Saturday Oct. 4 

Panama P. R. R.. Friday Oct. 10 

Allianca P. R. R.. Thursday Oct. 16 

Colon P. R. R.. Wednesday.. Oct. 22 

Advance P. R. R.. Tuesday Oct. 28 

Panama P. R. R. .Monday Nov. 3 

Allianca P. R. R.. Monday Nov. 10 

Colon P. R. R.. Monday Nov. 17 

Advance P. R. R. .Saturday Nov. 22 

Panama P. R. R.. Saturday Nov. 29 

Allianca P. R. R. . Friday Dec. 5 

CRISTOBAL TO NEW YORK.* 

Colon p. R. R. . Thursday Oct. 9 

Advance P. R. R. . Thursday Oct. 1 6 

Panama P. R. R. Wednesday . .Oct. 22 

Allianca P. R. R. .Tuesday Oct. 28 

Colon P. R. R. . Tuesday Nov. 4 

Advance P. R. R. Sunday Nov. 9 

Panama P. R. R. .Sunday Nov. 16 

AUianca P. R. R. . Saturday Nov. 22 

Colon P. R. R.. Saturday Nov. 29 

Advance P. R.R.. Friday Dec. 5 

NEW YORK TO COLON. 

Santa Marta U. F. C. . Wednesday . . Oct . 1 

Carl Schurz H.-A Saturday Oct. 4 

Pastores U. F. C. . Saturday Oct. 4 

Metapan U. F. C. . Wednesday . . Oct. 8 

Prinz August Wilhelm.H.-.A. Saturday. . . .Oct. 11 

Tivives U. F. C. . Saturday Oct. 11 

Danube R. M . . . Saturday Oct. 1 1 

Zacapa U. F. C. .Wednesday . .Oct. 15 

Emil L. Boas H.-A Saturday. . . .Oct. 18 

Tenadores U. F. C. Saturday Oct. 18 

Almirante U. F. C. Wednesday . .Oct. 22 

Tagus R. M.... Saturday Oct. 25 

Carrillo U. F. C. Saturday Oct. 25 

Prinz Joachim H.-A Saturday. . . .Oct. 25 

Santa Marta U. F. C. Wednesday. .Oct. 29 

Pastores U. F. C. Saturday . . . .Nov. 1 

Carl Schurz H.-A... .Saturday. . . .Nov. 1 

COLON TO NEW YORK. 

Almu-ante U. F. C. . Thursday Oct. 9 

Prinz Joachim H.-A. . . .Tuesday Oct. 14 

Carrillo U. F. C. Tuesday Oct. 14 

Tagus R. M. . .Tuesday Oct. 14 

Santa Marta U. F. C. . Thursday Oct. 16 

Pastores U. F. C. Tuesday Oct. 21 

Carl Schurz H.-A Tuesday Oct. 21 

Metapan U. F. C. Thursday Oct. 23 

Oruba R. M.... Tuesday Oct. 28 

Tivives U. F, C. Tuesday Oct. 28 

Prinz August Wilhelm. H.-A Tuesday Oct. 28 

Zacapa U. F. C. .Thursday.. . .Oct. 30 

Emil L. Boas H.-A Tuesday.. . . .Nov. 4 

Tenadores U. F. C. Tuesday Nov. 4 

Almirante U. F. C. Thursday Nov. 6 

Trent, R. M Tuesday Nov. 11 

NEW ORLEANS TO COLON. 

Turrialba U. F. C. Saturday Oct. 4 

Heredia U. F. C. Wednesday . .Oct. S 

Abangarez U. F. C. .Saturday . . . .Oct. 11 

Parismina U. F. C. Wednesday . .Oct. 15 

SLxaola U. F. C. .Saturday Oct. 18 

Cartago U. F. C. .Wednesday. .Oct. 22 

COLON TO NEW ORLEANS. 

Atenas U. F. C. Thursday Oct. 9 

Sixaola U. F. C. Saturday Oct. 11 

Turrialba U. F. C. Thursday.. ..Oct. 16 

Heredia U. F. C. Saturday Oct. 18 

Abangarez U. F C. Thursday Oct. 23 

♦Amended schedule, resulting from temporary with- 
drawal of the Allianca for repairs. 

The Panamanian Steamship Company's PanatnawiU 

sail from Panama for Aguadulce and Pedregal on 
October 16 and 20. 

^ 

Tide Table. 

The following table shows the time of high and low 
tide at Panama for week ending Octrln-r IS. 1913: 



Date. 


High 


Low 


Hifeh 


Low 


High 


On 12 


A.M. 

2 O.S 
2.41 
3,1.? 

3 40 

4 ().>< 

4 35 

5 1J5 


A.M. 
S 13 

8 50 

9 23 
9 s: 

10 25 
10 57 

11.30 


P.M. 

2 32 

3 05 

3 35 

4 02 
4 30 


P.M. 
8.26 
02 
9 35 
10 05 
10 33 


P.M. 


O-t. l.i 

Ot. 14 

Oct. 15 




Oct. 16 




Oct. 17 

Oct. IS .... 


4 58 

5 23 


11.07 
11.40 





75th meridian time. 



CANAL 




RECORD 



Volume VII. 



ANCON, CANAL ZONE, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 15, 1913. 



No. 8. 



The Canal Record 

Published weekly under the r.jtJiority and supentsion of 
the Isthmian Canal Commission. 



The Canal Record is published free of charge, one copy 
each to all employes of the Commission and Panama 
Railroad Company whose names are on the ^old roll. 
Eixlra copies and batk numbers can be obtained from the 
news stands of the Panama Railroad Company for fir^ 
cents each. 



Address all Communications, 

THE CANAL RECORD, 

Ancon, Canal Zone, 

Isthmus of Panama. 

No communication either for publication or requesting 
information, will receive attention unless signed with the 
full name and address of the writer. 



NOTES OF PROGRESS. 



I 



First Lockage at Pacific End. 

The first lockage at the Pacific end of I he 
Canal was effected on Tuesday. October 14, 
when clapet No. 6, the tug Miraflores with 
three barges, and the steam launch Birdera, 
were raised together through the west flight 
of Miraflores Locks, from the Pacific entrance 
channel to the surface of Miraflores Lake, 
which was at elevation plus 36.82 feet at 8 
a. m., on that date. 

The lockage was made without hitch of any 
kind, the gates, valves, controlling machines, 
and motors operating with the precision that 
has been obtained in the operations at Gatun 
Locks. The passage of the vessels was begun 
at n.ll a. m.; they entered the lower level at 
n.lS a. m., were raised to the elevation of the 
upper level at 12.15 p. m., and passed beyond 
the upper guard gates at 12.41 p. m. The 
entire operation consumed one hour and 30 
minutes. 

The gates and machinery* of the east flight 
at Pedro Miguel Locks were in readiness to 
effect the lift to Culebra Cut on the same 
day, though it was impracticable to do so, 
because of insufticient depth of water in the 
Cut south of Cucaracha slide. The tug. 
clapet, and launch returned to Balboa, the 
return lockage occupying 45 minutes in 
time. When the water in the south end of 
the Cut is sufficiently deep to allow the pas- 
sage of the vessels to Cucaracha slide, pipe- 
line suction dredge No. S5 will be brought 
from its work at the Balboa terminal through 
Miraflores Locks and be passed through the 
single lift at Pedro Miguel Locks to Culebra 
Cut. The barges now in the lake are loaded 
with trusses and other materials to be used 
in the removal of the portable span recently 
installed in bridge No. h~i\ of the Panama 
railroad, .across the Cut at Paraiso. when it 
is desired to pass vessels through the bridge. 



the supervision of the division engineer of the 
.Atlantic Division, and the installation, main- 
tenance, and operation of sump pumps, in 
Gatun Locks, spillway, and hydroelectric 
station, were transferred to the Mechanical 
Division, together with the necessary number 
of operatives and workmen. The power 
plants at Gatun and Miraflores will be con- 
solidated, and the records at both stations 
wdll hereafter be kept in the office of Mr. 
Hartley Rowe, electrical superintendent of the 
Mechanical Division, at Empire. The ac- 
count "Operation of Gatun power plant," 
will be continued as a separate account. 



Transfer of Atlantic Division Electrical Work. 
Effective October 15. the Gatun power 
plant, all electrical work heretofore under 



Thirteen Vessels Raised Together Through Ga- 
tun Locks. 

The west flight of Gatun Locks was used for 
the second time on October 9, when three 
groups of dredging vessels and a floating pile- 
driver, in tow of tugs, a total of 13 vessels, 
were lifted together from the .Atlantic en- 
trance channel to the surface of Gatun Lake. 
This performance, using the entire 1,000-foot 
length of each chamber, more nearly tested 
the capacity of the locks in commercial and 
naval use than the passage of the lone tug 
Gatun on September 26, Because of the care 
required in handling the groups, which filled 
the chambers with relatively slight clearance 
at the gates, the time of passage exceeded 
that of the Ga/H«, which was one hour and 51 
minutes. The first group of dredging vessels 
entered the lower level at 9.50 a. m., and the 
rear grcup passed beyond the upper guard 
gate at 12.40 p. m. 

The first group was composed of the tug 
Bohio, with a 600-ton barge loaded with 
piles and 500 tons of coal, and two old cement 
barges loaded with 250 tons of coal each. 
The second group was the Gatun, with pipe- 
line suction dredge No. 8f>, several pontoons, 
and a fuel oil barge. The third group was 
the tug Empire, with the French ladder 
dredge No. 5, two dump scows, and a float- 
ing piledriver. A motor launch and several 
pangas were towed in the rear. Upon reach- 
ing the lake level, the groups were towed 
beyond the end of the upper approach wall, 
then across to the edge of the lake, several 
hundred feet east of the Gatun station of the 
Panama railroad, to allow disembarking the 
passengers who had taken the opportunity to 
go through the locks. Shortly afterward, 
the tugs Galuu and Empire returned to the 
west approach, and were passed down the 
flight to the ocean in one hour and 35 minutes. 
The Bohio then took the three barges con- 
taining 1,000 tons of coal in tow to Gamboa. 
returning the next day for the dredges, and 
nill remain there as auxiliarv' in the dredg- 
ing operations in the ^^cinitv, and in Culebra 
Cut, 



DESTRUCTION OF LAST DIKE. 

Water in Gatun Lake and Culebra Cut at Gam- 
boa Equalized on October 10. 

A section of Gamboa dike was dynamited 
at 2.02 p. m., on Friday, October 10, making 
practically a clear opening 125 feet wide, 
through which water from Gatun Lake flowed 
in sufficient volume to complete the filling 
of Culebra Cut from the dike to Cucaracha 
slide in about two hours' time. Water was 
first admitted to this section of the Cut on 
October 1, and by the 10th, it had risen to 
elevation 61.7 feet, or about six feet below 
the level of the lake. The shot was not a 
large one, as compared with some of the 
previous blasts in connection with the Canal 
work, but it did perfect execution. 

In accordance with an arrangement made 
two or three days beforehand, the blast was 
fired by President Woodrow Wilson at Wash- 
ington. This was effected by using the 
land telegraph to Galveston, Texas, and 
connecting it there with the Central and 
South .\merican Cable Company's submarine 
cable, and land lines which, by employing the 
company's transisthmian cable, furnished a 
connection to a local circuit in the vicinity of 
the dike. When the Pres'dent depressed the 
lever, the current was relayed from point to 
point along the route, and was eventually 
transmitted to the local circuit, closing it 
and tripping a weight attached to the handle 
of a sw-itch. The weight threw the switch 
setting off the blast. 

The event was witnessed by a large number 
of spectators, who lined the banks of the 
Canal, oc Occupied advantageous positions 
on nearby hills. The zone of danger was 
marked by stakes, and the people were kept 
back of this line. A special train was run 
from Panama, and some e.xtra coaches were 
attached to the regular passenger train out of 
Colon. Half an hour or more after the dike 
was broken, a cayuco, or nati\e canoe, made 
the passage through, followed shortly by 
three launches. 

The accompanying plan and cross section 
of the dike shows its general characteristics, 
and its position relative to the east and west 
lines of the Canal. The dike was originally 
about 600 feet long, 78.2 feet above sealevel 
at its highest part, 150 feet wide at the base, 
and contained about 90,000 cubic yards of 
material. In the section that was destroyed, 
400 holes had been drilled from 20 to 35 feet 
in depth. The total number of holes in the 
dike was 1,277; 200 of these were made with 
tripod drills, and the remainder by churn 
drills. The length of all the holes if placed 
end to end would equal 41,166 lineal feet, or 
7.79 miles. In charging the well drill holes, 
25,700 feet of 4-inch galvanized iron pipe 
were used. 

The remainder of the dike, east of the 
opening, will probably be dynamited about 
October 17. It includes a hard rock sec- 



66 



THE CANAL RECORD 



Vol. VII, No. 8. 



tion where the end of the dike abuts on the 
east side of the Canal. What is left of the 
west end of the dike is composed of relatively 
soft material, and will be removed by dredge 
without any more blasting. 

Dredges i\^o.<?dand7Vo. 5, which were passed 
through Gatun Locks on October 9, have 
begun operations near the 'dike. No. 86 is 
assisting No. 82 in the work of cleaning the 
channel north of the dike of material silted 
in, and No. 5 is excavating'at the west end of 



A force of 200 men with shovels has been 
engaged in keeping the trench clear, and, 
with the assistance of the flowing water, ma- 
king it deeper and wider. By 4 p. m., Sunday, 
pipe connections had been made with a water 
tank on the south side of Contractor's Hill 
and the work of the men with shovels was 
augmented by sluicing with a 3-inch hose 
along the lower side of the barrier. During 
the forenoon of Monday, October 13, a 2- 
cylinder air-driven pump and connecting 




General Plan 
(Hatched section I 

the dike. The material excavated by ladder 

dredge No. 5 is being towed by the tug Bohio 

and dumped into an arm of the lake, north of 

the old site of Mamei. 

CUTTING THROUGH^CUCARACHA SLIDE. 

After the blowing up of Gamboa dike, the 
southern end of the Canal, beyond Gold Hill, 
was separated from the waters of the lake by 
the foot of Cucaracha slide. Beginning October 
6, forces of the Central Division had been 
engaged in digging a trench through the top 
of this barrier to allow the passage of the 
water from the north side. Successive down- 
ward movements of the slide, however, kept 
closing the trench, and it was decided to blow 
a gap in the barrier in the hope that the 
water would rush through it. A ton and a 
half of dynamite was placed in the toe, just 
opposite Contractor's Hill and exploded at 
4.15 p. m., October 10. The explosion threw 
a great mass of earth and rock high into the 
air, and stones were hurled as far as 1.500 
feet on either side, but the clay of the 
slide slumped back into place and closed the 
break before any considerable amount of 
water had passed through. Later blasts 
produced similar results, and the effort to 
clear the barrier in this manner was abandoned 
on Saturday, October 11. Trenching with 
pick and shovel was resumed that morn- 
ing, and water began to pass through to 
the south side of the slide at 3.43 in the 
afternoon. During Saturday night, a move- 
ment of the slide closed the trench. It 
was opened again by 11 a. m., Sunday, 
October J2, and has remained open since. 



OF G.\MBOA Dike. 
lown up October JO.) 

pipe and 4-inch hose were brought from 
Empire and installed on the north side of the 
slide. At 2.50 p. m., this outfit began supply- 
ing water at ISO pounds pressure for sluicing 
the northern, or upper, part of the trench. 
This so facilitated the work that by 4 p. m., 
the water was flowing over the slide at the 
rate of about 40 cubic feet a second, in a 
stream from six to eight feet wide and ap- 
proximately a foot deep, moving about six 
feet a second. It is beVieved that this method 



11^^^ er f?/ 7 IT cncn'- /q, /.g/.y 



feet, separated by a small lagoon, about 300 
feet across, enclosed between elevations of the 
toe of the slide. The material now in the 
Cut from the slide amounts to about 600,000 
cubic yards. 

The trench through Cucaracha slide has 
been deepened about a foot and a half, and 
widened slightly, since beginning of sluicing 
at the upper end, on Monday afternoon, but 
the flow of water has increased only slightly. 
The surface of the water in the south end of 
the Cut was at 43.1 feet above sealevel at 
8 o'clock in the morning of October 15, giving 
about a 4-foot depth in that part of the 
Canal. On October 14, it stood at +42.85. 
On the north side of the slide the surface of 
the water was at 68.96 teet above sealevel 
on October 15, at 10.30 a. m. 

By evening of October 15 the flow had 
increased to 60 cubic feet per second, and it 
is believed that by Tuesday, October 21, the 
water south of slide will be of sufficient depth 
to float a dredge. 

The last Culebra slide, immediately north 
of Gold Hill, made a movement across the 
channel on Saturday and Sunday, but suffi- 
cient clearance remains to allow passage of 
dredging vessels. The material at the foot 
of this slide is mostly rock, and it is possible 
that Udder and dipper dredges will be brought 
from the Atlantic entrance to work on it. 

Surveyors from the Sixth Division are 
engaged in placing water-gage rods and range 
markers, showing center line of Canal channel 
and liners 150 feet each side of center, in 
preparation for beginning of dredging. Final 
adjustments are being made at the twin pump 
relay station south of Contractor's Hill, and 
at the electric transformer station, for supply- 
ing it with power, diagonally across from it, 
on the 95-foot berm along the east bank. 
Discharge pipe and pontoons for supporting 
it on the v/ater, have been distributed along 
the west side for a distance oi about 1,000 
feet, between the relay station and the foot 
of Cucaracha slide. 



Donation of Books for Zone Penitentiary. 

Messrs. Hurst and Company, publishers, 
of New York City, have donated to the Cora- 
mission for use at the Canal Zone penitentiary 
533 bound volumes of miscellaneous literature. 



a/ S 7 71 Ocf: /o. /3/.? 




S/^J^9^.^^^^>^J^A%^/,.y,JF:^ ' 






Cross Section of G.uiboa Die 



will so increase the flow as to fill the south 
end of the Cut within a convenient period, 
though all calculations may be upset by 
further movements of the slide. The material 
of the slide is a dense, adhesive clay, inter- 
mixed with stones up to two feet in diameter, 
and does not yield easily to the flow of water. 
The trench through the slide is parallel 
to the axis of the Canal and about 20 feet 
from the west bank. Its intake is at elevation 
66.5 feet above sealevel, and its discharge at 
the level of water in the southern part of the 
Cut, which was at elevation plus 4.' .4 early 
in the evening of October 15. The trench is 
in two sections, with a total length of 600 



The books have been received at the peniten- 
tiary and are now being classified and listed 
in the catalogue of the library. The volumes 
donated consist of a large assortment ofs^fic- 
tion, some historical and scientific works, 
poems and poetical works, and dictionaries — 
French and English, German and English, 
and Spanish and English, The chief of 
police in reporting the receipt of the books 
states, as follows: 

"The books are new. and axcept for flaws in 
binding, or damages resultint; from handling, etc., 
Cwiiicii do not affect their value to the peniten- 
tiary at all) they are in splendid condition, and form 
a very important and much appreciated addition 
to th« prison library." 



October 15, 19 U. 



THE CANAL RECORD 



67 



EXECUTIVE ORDER. 



To Punish Daporced Persons Who Return to the 
Canal Zone. 

By virtue of the authority vested in me 
I hereby establish the following Order for 
the Canal Zone: 

Section 1. Any person who, after having 
served a sentence of imprisonment in the 
Canal Zone and after being deported there- 
from, returns to the Canal Zone shall be 
deemed guilty of felony' and punished by 
imprisonment in the penitentiary for a term 
of not less than six months nor more than 
two years, and upon the completion of his 
sentence he shall be removed from the Canal 
Zone in accordance with the laws and orders 
relating to deportation. An entr5' into the 
Canal Zone, for any purpose, shall be suffi- 
cient to constitute a return to the Zone within 
the meaning of this Order; provided, however, 
that in case of necessity the Chief Executive 
of the Canal Zone, in his discretion, may grant 
a permit to any such person to return to the 
Canal Zone temporarily, but should he re- 
main in the Canal Zone after the time speci- 
fied in the permit he shall be deemed guilty 
of a violation of this Order and punished as 
therein provided. 

Section 2. The Executive Order of May 
2, 1911, providing a punishment for deported 
persons who return to the Canal Zone is here- 
by repealed. 

Section 3. This Order shall take effect 
thirty days from and after its publication in 
The Canal Record. 

WooDRow Wilson. 

The White House, 
September 25, 1913. 
[No. 1832.) 



Canal Excavation in September. 

The grand total of Canal excavation to 
October 1 was 211,048,198 cubic yards, 
leaving to be excavated under the revised 
estimate of July 1, 1913, 21,304,802 cubic 
yards. 

The total excavation for the month of Sep- 
tember was 1,922,713 cubic yards. The wet 
excavation for the month was 1,425,964 cubic 
yards, and the dry e.^cavation 496,749 cubic 
yards. 

In the Atlantic section, the total excava- 
tion for September was 516,118 cubic yards. 
Of this amount, all but 1,091 cubic yards was 
wet excavation and consisted of material 
dredged from the Atlantic entrance to the 
Canal, and the Cristobal terminal, by forces 
of the Sixth Division. 

The total excavation in the Central Divi- 
sion was 519,800 cubic yards, 150,400 cubic 
yards of w^hich consisted of material removed 
in sluicing back of Gold Hill, by forces of the 
Fifth Division. Central Division steamshovels 
working in the Cut were permanently sus- 
pended on September 10, and up to an inclu- 
ding that date, a total of 297,800 cubic yards 
had been removed, not including 71,600 cu- 
bic yards taken out from the banks of the 
Canal to relieve pressure in the zone of slides. 

In the Pacific and Central sections, opera- 
tions by the Sixth Division resulted in the 
removal by dredges of 760,537 cubic yards, 
581,958 cubic yards from the Pacific entrance, 
and 178,579 cubic yards from the terminal 
basin. Dry excavation amounted to 126,- 
258 cubic yards, 85,188 cubic yards from the 
terminal site, and 41,070 cubic yards from the 



Canal prism. Of the dr>' excavation, 20,945 
cubic yards were charged to "Plant." 

A detailed statement of excavation, and a 
summary' of the work on the locks and dami, 
follow: 

ATLANTIC division. 



Locality. 


"Work" 

E.^cava- 

tion. 


"Plant" 
Excava- 
tion. 


Total 

Excava 

tion. 


Dry excavation — 
Locks, dam. and spill- 


Cu. Yds. 

l.OOl 


Cu. Yds. 


Cu. Yds. 
1,091 




Terminal 
















Total 


1.091 




1.091 




Atlantic entrance 

Locks, dam, and spill- 


478,689 




478.689 




36.338 




36.338 




Total 


515.027 




315.027 




Total wet and dry 
excavation 


516.118 




516,1.18 



CENTRAI, division. 



Dry excavation — 
Culebra Cut 


297,800 
150,400 


71,600 


369,400 
150,400 


Hydraulic excavation 






Total 


448.200 


71,600 


519,8(10 



PACIFIC riVISlON. 



Dry excavation — 
Locks, dams, and spill- 










69.432 
35,t81 


15,756 


85.188 
41 070 


Prism 








Total 


105,313 


20,945 


126 ''58 


Wet excavation — 

Pacific entrance 

Miraflores Locks 




581,958 




581,958 


Diversions 








Terminals 


178,579 




178,579 






Total 


760,537 


20.945 


760,537 


Total wet and dry ex- 
cavation 


865.850 


20.945 


886.795 



TOTAL CANAL EXCAVATION. 




Dry excavation 404.204 

Wet excavation 1,425.964 


92,545 


496.749 
1,425.964 


Total 1,830,168 


92 .545 


1.922,713 



LOCKS AND DAMS. 




Material. 


Atlantic. 


Pacific. 


Total. 


Concrete placed in 
locks 


Cu. Yds. 

442 

2,173 
24.531 


Cu. Yds. 

3.051 

44 
23.690 


Cm. Yds. 

3.493 

2,217 
48,221 


Concrete placed in 

dams and spillways. . 

Fill placed in dams. . . . 



Mean rainfall along Canal (nine stations) . 9.66 inches. 

By "Work" excavation is meant excavation actually 
made for one of the constituent parts of the Canal, 
such as prism, diversions, or locks, etc.. that is, it 
represents material taken from the area to be occupied 
by the Canal and constitutes excavation useful for the 
completed Canal. 

By "Plant" e.xcavation is meant e.\cavation outside 
any of the constituent parts of the Canal, such as 
prism, diversions, or locks, etc. It includes material 
necessary to be excavated for construction purposes 
only, and is chargeable against the particular plant 
item for which it is performed, such as prism, diver- 
sions, locks, etc. 



PERSONAL. 



Lieut-Col. William L. Sibert sailed for 
New York on the Ancon on IVIonday, Oc- 
tober 13, on his annual leave of absence. 

Col. William C. Gorgas, accompanied by 
Mrs. Gorgas, sailed for New York on the 
Ancon, on Monday, October 13, instead of 
on the Carrillo, on October 14, as first planned, 
Maj. Robert E. Noble and Dr. S. T. Darling, 
who are to go to South Africa with Colonel 
Gorgas, will sail for the United States on 
Thursday, October 16. They expect to 



arrive in Johannesburg about the middle 
of December. 

Mr. John D. Patterson sailed for New 
Orleans on the United Fruit Company's 
steamer Sixaola on Monday, October 13, on 
special leave of absence. 

M. Phihppe Bunau-Varilla, accompanied 
by his daughter, Vicomtesse de Rancougne, 
and son-in-law, the Vicomte dc Rancougne, 
arrived on the Isthmus on the Turrialba 
from New Orleans, on Thursday, October 9. 
They visited every part of the Canal work, 
saw the operation of Gatun Locks and the 
destruction of Gamboa dike, and sailed for 
Costa Rica on Tuesday, October 14. 
^ 

Examination by Board of Local Inspectors. 

The Board of Local Inspectors will con- 
duct examinations at the Administration 
Building, Ancon, on Wednesday, October 22, 
1913, beginning promptly at 2 p. m., for 
persons desiring to procure the following 
classes of licenses: Pilots, masters, mates, 
marine engineers, chauffeurs, and navigators 
of motor boats. All applicants for licenses 
must procure from the Executive Office, 
Ancon, forms of application and information 
respecting the filling out of same, at least 
one day before the e.xamination. Applicants 
for chauffeurs' licenses must also bring auto- 
mobiles. 

-♦ 

Concrete Work in Locks and Spillways. 

Concrete work in the Canal locks is nearly 
completed, the aggregate amount in place 
at the close of work on October 11, being 
4,480,773 cubic yards. 

A statement of the concrete laid in the 
three sets of locks for the Canal, and in 
Gatun and Miraflores spillways, as of 
October 11, follows: 

GATUN LOCKS. 

The last concrete for the locks proper, as distinguished 
from that necessary to finishing work by the Firat 
Division, was mixed and placed on August 16, 1913. 
At the close of work on chat day the total amount of 
concrete placed by the Atlantic Division amounted to 
2,045,485 cubic yards. 

PEDRO MIGUEL LOCK. 

Concrete laid. 
Cubic yards. 
Oct. 6 

Oct. 7 ::;;:; -6 

Oct. 8 2 

Oct. 9 

Oct. 10 32 

Oct. 11 ;;; ';_ 

Total 4Q 

Previously reported 924,185 

Grand total 924,225 

MIRAFLORES LOCKS. 

Oct. 6 

Oct. 7 'i 

Oct. 8 '.. 

Oct. 9 

Oct. 10 ■; 

Oct. u ;;.. 

Total 5 

Previously reported 1,511,058 

Grand total 1.511,063 

GATUN SPILLWAY.* 

Oc;. 6 50 

Oct. 7 92 

Oct. 8 : 50 

Oct. 9 46 

Oct. 10 50 

Oct. 11 68 

Total 356 

Previously reported 236,732 

Grand total 237.088 

MIRAFLORES SPILLWAY. 

Oct. 6 us 

Oct. 7 190 

Oct. 8 50 

Oct. 9 

Oct. 10 

Oct. 11 ..w 

Total 3jig 

Previously reported 75,958 

Grand total 76.346 

•Includes hydroelectric station. 



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October 15, 1913. 



THE CANAL RECORD 



69 



JOINT LAND COMMISSION. 



Awards. 

{Continued from last week.) 
Murray, Thomas, docket No. 1410. for al! rights, 
claims and other interests in growing crops, fruit 
trees, houses, tax Nos. 1030 and 1053. and any 
other buildings and any other improvements which 
the said Murray may possess or may have pos- 
sessed upon the lands of Cairaito Mulato. the sum 
$375 U. S. currency. 

Palencia, Fidelino, docket No. 776. for all rights, 
claims and other interests in growing crops, fruit trees. 
house, tax No. 915. and any other buildings, and an y 
other improvements which the said Palencia may pos- 
sess or may have possessed on the landsof Juan Grande 
(Waterloo), the sum of S40 U. S. currency. 

Park: David, docket Nos. 35Z and 1.323. forall rights, 
claims and other interests in growing crops, fruit trees, 
buildings, and any other improvements which the said 
Park may possess or may have possessed on lands lying 
above the S7-foot level near the Frijol Grande River 
on the lands of Tabemilla. not including claim for 
house formerly occupied by William Thomas, which 
is hereby dismissed, and not including further the 
property on La Loma de Tabemilla, which was pur- 
chased from Park by the United States in January. 
1912 by Voucher 1S510 for house, tax No. l,163and 
other improvements near Tabemilla. the sum of S90 
U. S. currency. 

Ramos. Gregorio, docket No. 374, for all rights, claims 
and other interests in growing crops, fruit trees, build- 
ings, and any other improvements which the said 
Ramos may have possessed near the Frijoles River 
on the lands of Tabemilla. before this was flooded by 
back water from the Frijoles River when the dump at 
Tabemilla partially closed the outlet for the water. 
the sum of SlOO U. S. currency. 

Ramos, Maria Raimundo, docket No. 1.606, for all 
rights, claims and other interests in growing crops, 
fruit trees, buildings, and any other improvements 
which the said Maria Raimundo Ramos may possess 
or may have possessed near Cerro \'iejo at the head- 
waters of the River Bailamonos, the sum of $75 U. S. 
currency. 

Ramos. Pedro, docket No. 965. for all rights, claims 
and other interests in growing crops, fruit trees, build- 
ings, and any other improvements which the said Ramos 
may possess or may have possessed in the region known 
as Agua Salud above the 87-foot contour line (this 
property being distinct from that below the S7-foot 
contour line purchased by the United States in July, 
1911, by Voucher 15925 for house, tax No. 1435 and im- 
provements near Buenavista), the sum of S90 U. S. 
currency. 

Rivas, Miguel, docket No. 347. for all rights, claims 
and other interests in growing crops, fruit trees, build- 
ings, and any other inprovements which the said Rivas 
may possess or may have possessed on the lands desig- 
nated as Baldo Espino. and in land now covered by the 
Tabemilla dump, but excluding any claim for prop- 
erty located at Loma Frijoles, which the said Rivas 
may have held as a tenant of Margaret Rose Smith, 
the sum of $75 U. S. currency. 

Rodriguez. Timoteo, docket No. 1,449, forall rights, 
claims and other interests in growing crops, fruit trees, 
buildings, and any other improvements which the said 
Rodriguez may possess or may have possessed on the 
lands of Cano Quebrado above the S7-foot contour line 
(this property being distinct from that lying below the 
87-foot contour line, which was purchased from Rod- 
riguez by the United States in 1911), the sum of $70 
U. S. currency. 

Salazar, Manuel. Estate of, docket No. 432, for all 
rights, claims and other interests in growing crops, 
fruit trees, buildings, and any other improvements 
which the said Salazar may have possessed in the region 
denominated Agua Salud and all improvements which 
were claimed by the said Salazar in the Canal Zone. 
the sum of S2S0 U. S. currency, and it is directed that 
this award be paid into the Circuit Court of the Second 
Judicial Circuit of the Canal Zone for payment to the 
proper representatives of Manuel Salazar, deceased. 

Salvador de Leon, Manuel, docket No. 1,017, forall 
rights, claims and other interests in growing crops, 
fruit trees, buildings, and other improvements which 
the said Salvador de Leon may possess or may have 
possessed near the River Cano Quebrado on the lands 
of Cano Quebrado the sum of S200 U. S. currency. 

Spalding. Edward, docket No. 845, for all rights, 
claims and other interests in growing crops, fruit trees, 
buildings, and any other improvements which the said 
Spalding may possess on the lands designated as C:in- 
saloma and Waterloo (the said property being dis- 
tinct from that located on the estate of Juan Grande 
on the west bank of the Chagres River, for which an 
award was made to Spalding under date of June 24, 
1913 by the Joint Land Commission), the sum of $60 
U. S. currency. 



Teran. Catalino. docket No. 1,102. forall rights, claims 
and other interests in growing crops, fruit trees, house, 
tax No. 885, and any other buildings, and any other 
improvements which the said Teran may possess or may 
have possessed at various points on the lands of Juan 
Grande (Waterloo), the sum of $250 U. S. currency. 

Teran, David, docket No. 494, for all rights, claims 
and other interests in growing crops, fruit trees, house, 
tax No. 892. and any other buildings, and any other 
improvements which the said Teran may possess or 
ni^y have possessed on the landsof Juan Grande (Water- 
loo), but not including claim of said Teran 'docket 
No. 1,4!4) for property said to be covered by Dump 
4. the sum of SlOO U. S. currency. 

Vas.'ial, William, docket A^o. /,J-?J. forall rights. claims 
and other interests in growing crops, fruit trees, build- 
ings, and any other improvements which the said 
Vassal may possessor may have possessed on the lands 
of Caimito Mulato, exclusive of the value of Houses 
1036 and 1039 and improvements upon one hectare 
of land surrounding House 1039. the excluded prop- 
erties having been held by Vassal under leases from 
the I. C. C, and for which consequently no award can 
be made, in the sum of $225 U. S. currency. 

Williams, David, for all rights, claims and other 
interests in growing crops, fruit trees, house, tax No. 
1034, and any other buildings, and any other im- 
provements which the said Williams may possess 
or may have possessed on the lands of Caimito. the 
sum of $70 U. S. currency. Total, $6,785. 

(Signed) Federico Bovd. Roland P. Falkner, 
Samuel Lewis. L. S. Rowe. Commissioners. 

September 20. 1913. 



Award No 35 — In the matter of the estate of Cuatro 
Calles. docket No. 382. A claim was submitted to the 
Joint Commission for the estate of Cuatro Calles. 
in which Ariuro. Carlos W. and Josefina Muller are 
stated to have a two-thirds interest, and the firm of 
Pinel Hermanos a one-third interest. 

The evidence shows that the Muller family ac- 
quired their interest in these lands by a purchase on 
February 27, 1904 from Julio Poylo. and that the firm 
of Pinel Hermanos acquired their interest by a purchase 
from the said Julio Poylo on December 3, 1904. 

The history of the land shows that Poylo acquired 
his interest in the same by purchase on February 24, 
1904 from ^^arciso Barsallo. As evidence of the title 
of the Barsallo family in this land there were submitted 
certain declarations taken before the municipal judge 
of Gorgona in 1904 to the effect that in 1864 Segundo 
Rodriguez sold the Ismd by deed, which has since been 
lost, to Evaristo Barsallo, who bought the same for 
his children. Narciso and others. These declarations 
further stated that the Barsallo family had been in 
peaceable possession of the land after the sale, and 
that occupiers of the land recognized the Barsallo 
family as owners. The accuracy of these declarations 
was drawn in question by Counsel for the United States, 
but in the opinion of the Commission, the evidence 
was not ot a character to justify the Commission in 
repudiating the sale in 1864. Accepting the fact of a 
sale to Evaristo Barsallo in 1864 and taking into con- 
sideration the fact that the possession of these lands 
by the Barsallo family, after that date, was not ques- 
tioned, it is not necessary for the Commission to trace 
the steps whereby Rodriguez acquired title to the 
property. In making a purchase from the claimants 
in 1909 the United States impliedly recognized title, 
and the Commission has reached the conclusion that 
the validity of such title as may be held by the present 
claimants ought not to be disputed by the Commission. 

It appeared in the evidence before the Commission, 
and by the ocular inspection of the property that a 
large portion of the property w^s heavily wooded, and 
it appeared to the satisfaction of the Commission 
that the contention of the claimants that the property 
contained valuable timber was in some degree sustained. 
In appraising the value of the said property this element 
was taken into consideration by the Commission. 

On the basis of the evidence presented an award is 
hereby made against the United States of America for 
the entire estate of Cuatro Calles, said award to include 
all right, title and interest of any persons to the entire 
estate, not heretofore acquired by the L^nited States, 
together with all claims for improvements of whatsoever 
nature on the part of the owners of said estate, and 
of all rights claimed by them, in the sum of $3,000 
U. S. currency. 

The conditions of this award are: 

First. — This award shall be paid to the respective 
claimants hereinafter named in the amounts herein- 
after specified on or before the 20th day of October, 
1913. and if payment or tender of payment of any of 
the items of this award is not made on or before that 
date such items shall thereafter bear interest at the 
rate of six per centum per annum until paid. 

Second. — The above award shall be distributed to 
the claimants hereinafter named, and the amount to 



be received by each is. as follows: Arturo. Carlos W.. 
and Josefina Muller, $2,000. Pinel Hermanos SI.OOO. 

(Sign£d) Federico Bovd, Roland P. Falkner, 
Samuel Lewis, L. S. Rowe, Commissioners . 

September 20, 1913. 

Award No. 38 — In the matter of sundry claims in 
the valley of the Trinidad River. Docket 1244-.A. etc. — 
An award is hereby made against the United States 
of America, in favor of the claimants hereinafter 
named, in the sum of $2,575 U. S. currency. 

This award shall be paid to the respective clairaanta 
hereinafter named, in the amounts hereinafter speci- 
fied, on or before the 20th day of October. 1913. and 
if payment or tender of payment of any of the items 
of this award is not made on or before that date, such 
items shall thereafter bear interest at the rate of six 
per centum per annum until paid: 

Benitez, Felipe, docket No. 191. for all rights, claims 
and other interests in growing crops, fruit trees, build- 
ings, and any other improvements whicli the said 
Benitez may possess or may have possessed in the valley 
of the Rio Trinidad below the 100-foot contour line 
beyond the limits of the Canal Zone, but subject to 
the jurisdiction of the Canal Zone at Siricito. the sum 
of $300 U. S. currency. 

Castillo. Desideria, docket No. 177, for all rights, 
claims and other interests in growing crops, fruit trees, 
buildings or any other improvements which the said 
Desideria Castillo may possess or may have possessed 
in the valley of the Rio Trinidad below the 100-foot 
contour line beyond the limits of the Canal Zone, but 
subject to the jurisdiction of the Canal Zone at Sin 
Grande, the sum of $600 U. S. currency. 

Diaz. Feliciano. docket No. 182, for all rights, claims 
and other interests in growing crops, fruit trees, build- 
ings or any other improvements which the said Diaz 
may possess or may have possessed in the valley of the 
Rio Trinidad below the 100-foot contour line beyond 
the limits of the Canal Zone, but subject to the juris- 
diction of the Canal Zone at Las Cruces. the sum of 
$25 U. S. currency. 

Labarca, Ascencidn. docket No. 196, for all rights, 
claims and other interests in growing crops, fruit trees', 
buildings or any other improvements which the said 
Labarca may possess or may have possessed in the 
valley of the Rio Trinidad below the 100-foot con- 
tour line beyond the limits of the Canal Zone, but 
subject to the jurisdiction of the Canal Zone, at Sin 
Grande, the sum of $300 U. S. currency. 

Labarca, Hilario. docket No. 190. for all rights, 
claims and other interests in growing crops, fruit trees, 
buildings or any other improvements which the said 
Labarca may possess or may have possessed in the 
valley of the Rio Trinidad below the 100-foot contour 
line beyond the hmits of the Canal Zone, but subject 
to the jurisdiction of the Canal Zone at Siricito, the 
sum of S150 U. S. currency. 

Rivera, Reyes, docket No. 203, for all rights, claims 
and other interests in growing crops, fruit trees, build- 
ings or any other improvements which the said Rivera 
may possess or may have possessed in the valley of 
the Rio Trinidad below the 100-foot contourline beyond 
the limits of the Canal Zone, but subject to the juris- 
diction of the Canal Zone at Siri Grande, the said 
improvements being above the 87-foot contour line, 
and being distinct from the property lying below the 
S7-foot contour line which was purch-i'^ed from the 
claimant by the United States in May, 1911, by 
Voucher 15190. the sum of $400 U. S. currency. 

Rodriguez, Domingo, docket No. 192, for all rights, 
claims and other interests in growing crops, fruit trees. 
buildings or any other improvements which the said 
Rodriguez may possess or may have possessed in the 
valley of the Rio Trinidad below the 100-foot contour 
line beyond the limits of the Canal Zone, but subject 
to the jurisdiction of the Canal Zone at Siricito. the 
sura of S40 U. S. currency. 

Rodriguez, Juan, docket No. 199, for all rights, claims 
and other interests in growing crops, fruit trees, build- 
ings, or any other improvements which the said Rod- 
riguez may possess or may have possessed in the valley 
of the Rio Trinidad below the 100-/oot contour line 
beyond the limits of the Canal Zone, but subject to 
the jurisdiction of the Canal Zone at Siri. the said 
improvements being above the 87-foot contour line, 
and being distinct from the property lying below the 
87-foot contour line which was purchased from the 
claimant by the United States, the sum of $90 U. S. 
currency. 

Sanchez, Nicolas, docket No. 187. for all rights, 
claims and other interests in growing crops, fruit trees, 
buildings 'or any other improvements which the said 
Sanchez may possess or may have possessed in the 
valley of the Rio Trinidad below the 100-foot contour 
line beyond the limits of the Canal Zone, but subject 
to the jurisdiction of the Canal Zone at Las Cruces, the 
sum of $50 U. S. currency. 

Soto, Pedro, docket No. 189. for all rights, claims and 
other interests in growing crops, fruit trees, buildings 
or any other improvements which the said Soto may 



70 



THE CANAL RECORD 



Vol. vn.No.s. 



possess or may have possessed in the valley of the Rio 
Trinidad below the 100-foot contour line beyond the 
limits of the Canal Zone, but subject to the jurisdiction 
of the Canal Zone at Siricito, the sum of S180 U. S. 
currency. 

Troyer. Luciano, docket No. 178. for all rights, claims, 
and other interests in growing crops, fruit trees, build- 
infes. or any other improvements which the said 
Luciana Troj-er may possess or may have possessed in 
the valley of the Rio Trinidad below the 100-foot 
contour line beyond the limits of the Canal Zone, but 
euoject to the jurisdiction of the Canal Zone at Siricito, 
the sura of S130 U. S. currency. 

Valdez, Demetrio. aockei No. 205, for all rights, claims 
and other interests in growing crops, fruit trees, build- 
ings, or any other improvements which the said 
Valdez may possess or may have possessed in the valley 
of the Rio Trinidad below the 100-foot contour line 
beyond the Hmits of the Canal Zone, but subject to the 
jurisdiction of the Canal Zone at Siri Grande, the said 
improvements being above the 87-foot contour line, and 
being distinct from the property lying below the 87- 
foot contour line which was purchased from the claim- 
ant by the United States, the sum of S35 U. S." currency. 

ValasQuez. Gregorio, docket No. 183. for all rights. 
claims, and other interests in growing crops, fruit trees, 
buildings, or any other improvements which the said 
Valasquez may possess or may have possessed in the 
valley of the Rio Trinidad below the 100-foot contour 
line beyond the limits of the Canal Zone, but subject 
to the jurisdiction of the Canal Zone at Siri Grande, the 
said improvements being above the S7-foot contour line, 
and being distinct from the property lying below the 
87-foot contour line which was purchased from claim- 
ant by the United States in April, 1911 by Voucher 
14790, the, sum of S275 U. S. currency. Total. S2,575 
U. S. currency. 

(Signed) Federico Boyd. Roland P. Falkner. 
Samuel Lewis. L. S. Rowe, Commissioners. 

September 20, 1913. 



Award No. 39 — In the matter of sundry claims at 
Matachin. Docket 618-A, etc, — An'award is hereby made 
against the United States of America in favor of the 
persons hereinafter named, who are occupiers of that 
portion of the original estate of Matachin, which was 
purchased by the French Canal Company and subse- 
quently became the property of the United States of 
America, in the sum of $670 U. S. currency. 

This award shall be paid to the respective claimants 
hereinafter named in the amounts hereinafter specified 
on or before the 20th day of October. 19U, and if pay- 
ment or tender of payment of any of the items of this 
award is not made on or before that date, such items 
shall thereafter bear interest at the rate of six per 
centum per annum until paid: 

Alexatider, Joseph, for all rights, claims and other 
interests in growing crops, fruit trees, house, tax No. 
352, and any other buildings and any other improve- 
ments which the said Alexander may possess on the 
lands of Matachin. the sum of $50 U. S. currency. 

Brisei. Samuel, docket No. 137. for all rights, claims 
and other interests in growing crops, fruit trees, house, 
tax No. 117. and any other buildings and any other 
improvements which the said Briset may possess on 
the lands of Matachin, the sum of $65 U. S. currency. 

Cesaire, Boula, in docket No. 930, for all rights, 
claims and other interests in growing crops, fruit trees, 
house, tax No. 650. and any other improvements whidi 
the said Cesaire may possess on the lands of Matachin. 
the sum of $65 U. S. currency. 

Cleron.Felix. in docket No. 931. for all rights, claims 
and other interests in growing crops, fruit trees, house. 
tax No. 593, and any other buildings and any other 
improvements which the said Cleron may possess on 
the lands of Matachin. the sum of $200 U. S. currency. 

Graham, Edward, docket No. 1,076. for all rights, 
claims and other interests in growing crops, fruit trees, 
houses, tax Nos. 354 and 355. and any other buildings 
and any other improvements which the said Graham 
may possess on the lands of Matachin, the sum of $70 
U. S. currency. 

Johnson. J. R.. docket No. 1,068, for all rights claims 
and other interests ingrowing crops, fruit trees, house. 
tax No. 651, and any other buildings and any other 
improvements which the said Johnson may possess 
on the lands of Matachin, the sum of $150 U. S. cur- 
rency. 

yo//y. James, for all rights, claims and other interests 
in growing crops, fruit trees, house, tax No. 395, and 
any other buildings and any other improvements 
which the said Jolly may possess on the lands of Mata- 
chin, the sum of $70 U. S. currency. Total. $670 U. S. 
currency. 

(Signed) Federico Boyd, Roland P. Falkner. 
Samuel Lewis, L. S. Rowe. Commissioners. 

September 20, 191.?. 



J,250'A. and 870. — With respect to the houses in the 
town of Gorgona claimed by Gabriel Jolly, the evi- 
dence before the Commission shows that he was the 
owner of the property hereinafter referred to before he 
accepted any leases from the Isthmian Canal Commis- 
sion. In his hearing before the Commission the claim- 
ant stated that he was the owner of the land upon 
which some of the houses were erected. The evidence 
submitted to the Commission does not sustain this 
contention, and in making its award to Gabriel Jolly 
it is to be understood that the Commission dismisses 
without award any claims presented by him for 
ownership in the land. 

In conformity with the principles formulated in the 
opinion of July 25, 1913 on the demurrer of Counselfor 
the United States to the jurisdiction of the Commis- 
sion in the matter of the claim of Juan Sotillo, and in 
accprdance with the evidence submitted to the Com- 
mission : 

An award is hereby made against the United States 
of America in favor of Gabriel Jolly for certain build- 
ings hereinafter identified by their respective tax 
numbers, the said award to include all rights, claims 
and interests of any persons in the said building, 
together with all claims for improvements of whatsoever 
nature on the part of the said Gabriel Jolly and all rights 
claimed by him. in the sum of $2,205 U. S. currency. 
The foregoing award is made up of awards for 
individual houses, as follows; 
Tax No. Award Tax No. Award. 

704 $360 759 $220 

705 625 814 110 

720 265 825 130 

748 365 856 130 

(Tax No. 856 was destroyed by the Canal Zone Govern- 
ment in 1911.) 

This award shall be paid to the said Gabriel Joliy 
on or before the 20th day of October. 1913. and if pay- 
ment or tender of payment of any of the items of this 
award is not made on or before that date, such items 
shall thereafter bear interest at the rate of six per 
centum per annum until paid. 

(Signed) Federico Boyd, Roland P. Falkner, 
Samuel Lewis, L, S. Rowe, Commissioners. 

September 20, 1913. 



Award No. 40 — In the matter of the claim of Gabriel 
Jolly for houses -in the town of Gorgona. docket No. 



Award No. 41 — In the matter of certain claims for 
houses in the town of Gorgona, docket No. 1,250-A . etc. — 
The evidence before the Commission shows that the 
persons hereinafter named were the owners of the prop- 
erties hereinafter referred to before they accepted any 
leases from the Isthmian Canal Commission. In no 
case did the persons hereinafter named make any 
claim to the ownership of the land. 

In conformity with the principles formulated in the 
opinion of July 25, 1913. on the demurrer of Counsel 
of the United States to the jurisdiction of the Com- 
mission in the matter of the claim of Juan Sotillo, and in 
accordance with the evidence submitted to the Com- 
mission, an award is hereby made against the United 
States of America for certain buildings hereinafter 
identified by the respective tax numbers, the said 
award to include all rights, claims and interests of any 
persons in the said buildings, together with aJl claims 
for improvements of whatsoever nature on the part 
of any persons hereinafter named, and all rights claimed 
by them in the sum of $3,585 U. S. currency. 

This award shall be paid to the respective persons 
named hereinafter, in the amounts hereinafter specified, 
on or before the 20th day of October, 1913. and if pay- 
ment or tender of payment of any of the items of this 
award is not made on or before that date such items 
shall thereafter bear interest at the rate of six per 
centum per annum until paid. 

To the owners of buildings, for the settlement of 
all rights, claims or other interests which they may 
have in the same, together witli any other improve- 
ments located on the lots with houses designated by 
their tax numbers, as follows: 

AmosGcorge.m docket Nos. 588 andl,620, tax No. 844, 
$100. (The property above described, is distinct from 
that of Juan Grande, for which an award was made by 
the Joint Land Commission under date of June 24, 1913.) 
Deslarel, Emile. tax No. 860, $160. Jolly, Edward. 
tax No. 869. $40. Serlan iporlan). Theramene, tax No. 
781, $40. Tillman. Marie, a total of Sl.520. for in- 
dividual houses, as follows; Tax No. 707. $850; tax 
No. 756, $340; tax. No. 757, $330. Wier, Alfred, Estate 
of, docket No. 1.320. a total of $525, for individual 
houses, as follows: Tax No. 810. $200; tax No. 818. 
$145; tax No. 845. $180; and it is directed that the 
foregoing award in favor of the estate of Alfred Wier 
be paid into the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial 
Circuit of the Canal Zone for payment to the duly 
qualified representative of said estate. The owners 
of house, tax No. 704, docket No. 497. a total of $1,200. 
to be divided among the owners for their respective 
interests, as follows: Barsallo, Saturnina, $300; Posa- 



da. Carmen, $450; Posada, Elvira. $450. Grand 
total $3,585 U. S. currency, 

(Signed) Federico Boyd. Roland P. Falkner. 
Samuel Lewis, L. S. Rowe, Cojnmissioners. 

September 20. 1913. 

Award No. 42 — In the matter of the claim of B. Man- 
cherie, for house, tax No. 864 at Gorgona. docket No. 
1.250-A. — Claim was entered by B. Moncherie for 
the value of house No. 864 located at New Town, Gor- 
gona. The evidence in this case showed that the claim- 
ant purchased the house from G. Francis, and that at 
no time was any lease issued by the Isthmian Canal 
Commission for the land occupied by this house. 
The claimant, therefore, has the status of an occupier 
of public lands, and in accordance with the principles 
formulated by the Commission with respect _to such 
occupiers, and the evidence in the case; 

An award is hereby made against the United States 
in favor of B. Moncherie for all rights, claims or other 
interests which he may have in house No. 864 in the 
town of Gorgona, together with any other improve- 
ments on the lot occupied by this house, in the sum of 
$25 U. S. currency. 

This award shall be paid to the claimant in the 
amount specified on or before the 20th day of October, 
1913, and if payment or tender of payment of this 
award is not made on or before that date it shall there- 
after bear interest at the rate of six per centum per 
annum until paid. 

(Signed) Federico Bo\'D, Roland P. Falkner, 
Samuel Lewis, L, S. Rowe, Commissioners. 

September 20. 1913. 

Award No. 43 — In the matter of the estate of Matachin, 
docket Nos. 618 and 722 — The evidence before the 
Commission shows that portions of the original estate 
of Matachin were purchased from the owners by the 
French Canal Company, and subsequently became 
the property of the United States of America. 

In 1909. some of the members of the Bosque family 
sold to the United States the land lying below the 87- 
foot level. The property sold included two houses in 
the town of Matachin which belonged to the Bosque 
family. One of the members of the family, Angelica 
Bosque, refused to join in this sale. Her interest was 
shown by the evidence to be a one-tenth undivided 
interest in the entire estate. Angelica Bosque died 
after this conveyance was made, and her estate is now 
represented by her husband, Hilario V. Seixas, who 
claims as administrator of the estate of Angelica 
Maria Bosque de Seixas, deceased, the amount of her 
interest in the lands included in this conveyance. In 
the award hereafter made to Hilario V. Seixas, as 
administrator of the estate of Angelica Mar^a Bosque 
de Seixas. deceased, the amount of this interest is 
included. 

For the remainder of the estate claim is entered as 
the owners thereof by Maria E. J. de Bosque, Doraitila 
Carmen Bosque de Paredes. and Hilario V. Seixas as 
administrator of the estate of Angelica Maria Bosque 
de Seixas, deceased. These persons were also claim- 
ants for damages alleged to have been suffered by the 
actions of the Isthmian Canal Commission. 

The history of the case shows that at one time the 
estate was divided into two equal parts, one of which 
belonged to the present claimants, and certain others 
now deceased, as heirs of Cruz Bosque, and the other 
to General Buenaventura Correoso. Subsequently, one 
oi the claimant?. Domitila Carmen Bosque de Paredes. 
purchased the interest of General Buenaventura Cor- 
reoso, and became entitled to one-half interest in the 
estate, in addition to that which she possessed as one 
of the heirs of Cruz Bosque. 

A further claim was made for the loss of passes on 
the Panama railroad, but the Commission made no 
allowance for such claims for the reason,-, set forth in a 
separate opinion. No allowance was made by the Com- 
mission for the cost of a survey and maps used ijv the 
claimants in presenting their case before the Com- 
mission, and for which claim was made. 

Further claims for damages alleged to have been 
caused by the clearing of the Carabali watershed, 
and consequent loss of rentals, by the issue by the 
Isthmian Canal Commission of leases to certain lands 
which were not the property of the United States, but 
were the property of the claimants, and the consequent 
loss of rentals, and by the construction of a road by the 
Isthmian Canal Commission through the property 
claimed by the Bosque family, and a claim for the 
value of two houses in the village of Matachin on' 
lands conveyed to the United States by deed of May 
3, 1909. were considered by the Commission, and in 
so far as such claims were deemed to be justified an 
allowance therefor was made and was included in the 
award of the Commission. 

It is further in evidence that two of the claimants, 
Maria E. Jaramillo de Bosque, and Domitila Carmen 
Bosque de Paredes have each of them executed mort- 
gages against their interest in the lands of Matachin, 
which mortgages are still in existence. 

On the basis of the evidence submitted to the 



October 15, 1913. 



THE CANAL RECORD 



71 



Commission, an award is hereby made against the 
United States of America ' in favor of the persons 
hereinafter named for the entire estate of Mata- 
chin. not heretofore acquired by the United States, 
the said award to include all right, title and interest 
of any of the persons hereinafter named to the 
said estate of Matachin, including any improvements 
thereon which may be claimed by them, and including 
the right, title and interest as any of them may pos- 
sess in the lands conveyed to the United States in 1909, 
together with all claims for damages which any of the 
persons hereinafter named have presented or may pre- 
sent against the- Isthmian Canal Commission, by 
reason of any action of the said Isthmian Canal Com- 
mission or its agents, in the sum of $20,260 U. S. cur- 
rency. 

This award shall be paid as hereinafter specified on 
or before the 22d day of October. 1913. and if pay- 
ment or tender of payment of any of the items of this 
award be not made on or before the said date, such 
items shall thereafter bear interest at six per centum 
per annum until paid. 

This award shall be distributed, as follows: 

Maria E. Jaramillo de Bosque. S6.000. This award 
is subject to such equities, if any. as may exist in favor 
of third parties, and it is directed that the said award 
be paid into the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial 
Circuit of the Canal Zone for distribution according 
to the terms of this award. 

Domitila Carmen Bosque de Parades, $ 1 2 .000. 
This award is subject to sucli equities, if any, as may 
exist in favor of third parties, and it is directed that the 
said award be paid into the Circuit Court of the Second 
Judicial Circuit of the Canal Zone for distribution 
according to the terms of this award. 

Hilario V". Seixas. administrator of the estate of 
Angelica Maria Bosque de SeLxas. deceased, $2,260. 
Total. S20.260 U- S. currency. 

(Signed) Federico Boyd. Roland P. Falkner. 
Samuel Lewis. L. S. Rowe. Commissioners. 

September 22. 1913. 



Award No. 44 — In Ihe mailer of sundry claims for 
improvements on the lands of Matachin, docket No. 
61S-A, etc. — In the cases of the claims of the persons 
hereinafter named for the properties herein referred to, 
the evidence before the Commission shdwed that the 
properties in question were located above the 87-foot 
contour line upon the property claimed by the Bosque 
family, and that for the greater number, if not all, of 
these properties, rent was paid to the Bosque family. 

In conformity with the principles formulated by the 
Commission in the opinion of September 20. 1913. 
on the right to compensation of tenants of the Bosque 
family above the 87-foot contour line, and the evidence 
in each case: 

An award is hereby made against the United States 
of America in favor of the persons hereinafter named, 
for their interest in improvenients on the lands above 
the 87-foot contour line which are claimed by the Bosque 
family, the said award to include all riglits, claims, 
and other interests of the persons hereinafter named 
in growing crops, fruit trees, the houses designated by 
their respective tax numbers and any other improve- 
ments claimed by them on lands above the S7-foot 
contour line claimed by the Bosque family in the sum 
of S3. 255 U. S. currency. 
\ The conditions of this award are: 

First. — This award shall be paid to the respective 
claimants hereinafter named in the amounts herein- 
after specified, on or before the 22d day of October, 1913, 
and if payment or tender of payment of any of the 
items of this award is not made on or before that date, 
such items shall thereafter bear interest at the rate 
of six per centum per annum until paid- 

Second. — Tin? award shall be distributed among the 
persons hereinafter named whose properties are iden- 
tified by the tax numbers of the houses, if any, which 
are included in their claims, in the amounts hereinafter 
specified, as follows: 

Name. Docket House 

No. No. Aynount. 

Becerra, Josl' Domingo Not given $30 

Beckford, Elizabeth S65 & 1,367 556 65 

Blake, Thomas Not given 80 

Blanche, Evadnie 632 375 75 

Cabarca, Aristide 364 40 

Castello, Natalie Jean- 

nette 138 1.750 70 

Chamjers. Herbert 70 543 & 545 150 

Clough, James 1,378 Farm only 25 

Cordero, Fernando 385 47 350 

Desir. EdA'ard In 1,637 648 45 

Drayton. James Est. of 370 35 

Garcia. Jose, including 

claim for one thatched 

house and other im- 
provements on the 

lands of Juan Grande 264 200 

Hernandez. Juliana 381 20 

Jiron, Jose 1.534 Farm only 250 

Jolmson. Joseph 472 125 

Jurado, Hortencia... 669 475 45 



Name. Docket House 

No. No. Amount. 

Jurado, Nicolas 670 & 671 479 700 

Lewis, Jacob 674 1 .682 25 

McCall. William 680 474 125 

Maldonado. Manuel In 515 382 35 

Montebeliard. George. . . 1.552 616 60 

Narvaez, Francisco 690 Farm only 20 

Nelson, John Farm onlv 15 

PadUta. Felipe 1.093 438 25 

Perez, Narcisa 1,055 379 85 

Quadra. Miguel 905 367 40 

Ray. James 699 371 30 

Rosales. Juan 1,559 Not given 20 

Samuels. William 507 374 30 

Slater, Jacob Farm only 10 

Urango. Cirilo 558 378 30 

\'aldelamar. Dolores 715 1,331 80 

Volberg, Ludger Not given 20 

Walker. David (Alfred) . 403 Farm only 300 

Total $3,255 

(Signed) Federico Boyd, Roland P. Falkner. 

Samuel Lewis. L. S. Rowe, Commissioners. ' 
September 22. 1913. 



Name. 



A7vard No. 45 — In the matter of sundry clains for 
improvements on the lands of Matachin. docket No. 
618-A. etc. — In the cases of the claims of the persons 
hereinafter named for the properties herein referred 
to. the evidence before the Commission showed that 
the properties were located on that portion of the lands 
of IVIatachin below the 87-foot contour line, which was 
conveyed to the United States by deed of May 3. 1909. 
and that for these properties rent was paid to the 
Bosque family. 

In conformity with the principles formulated by the 
Commission in its opinion of September 16, 1913, on 
the right to compensation of tenants below the 87- 
foot contour line on the lands of Matachin conveyed 
to the United States by deed of May 3, 1909, and the 
evidence in each case: 

An award is hereby made against the United States 
of America in favor of the persons hereinafter named 
for their interest in improvements on the lands of 
Matachin below the 87-foot contour line which were 
conveyed to the United States by deed of May 3. 1909, 
the said award to include all rights, claims, and other 
interests of the persons hereinafter nidmed in growing 
crops, fruit trees, the houses designated by their re- 
spective tax numbers and any other improvements 
claimed by them, on the said portion of the lands of 
Matachin, in the sum of S9,910 U. S. currency. 
The conditions of this award are: 
First — This award shall be paid to the respective 
claimants hereinafter named, in the amounts herein- 
after specified, on or before the 22d day of October, 
1913, and if payment or tender of payment of any of 
the items of this award is not made on or before that 
date, such items shall thereafter bear interest at the 
rate of six per centum per annum until paid. 

Second. — This award shall be distributed among the 
persons hereinafter named, whose properties are des- 
ignated by the tax numbers of the houses which are 
included in their claims, in the amounts hereinafter 
specified, as follows: 

Na me. Docket House 

No. No. Am't. 

Balderrama, Salome.. : 525 $50 

Barsallo. Martin 598 80 

Berguido. Alejandro 902 518 230 

Bryan, Ellen Matilda... , 568 385 150 

By field. Catherine 638 515 170 

Caheza. Zoraida In 539 426 255 

Caldwell. D. W 158 35 

Canavaggio. Pascal In 519 492 210 

Carrera. Manuel 561 488 & 513 200 

Centeno, Joaquin 907 506 & 524 570 

Ceribo, Manuel 442 25 

Chong. (Achong) Jose.... 566 487 710 

Daza, Rosario 1,052 412 95 

Dominguez. Natividad. . 650 397 45 

Douglas, Patigan 451 170 

Douglas, Sarah 900 519 20 

Esper. Elias 400 220 

Garcia, Ignacio 159 & 160 50 

Gavarras, Antonio 555 428 & 429 65 

Gomez, Ezequiel 659 436 60 

Gracias, Maria 511 150 

Howell, William 665 387 30 

Jimenez, Domingo 417 130 

Jiron, Angelica 514 160 

Jiron. Evangelista 668 413 160 

Jiron. Josefina 510 516 95 

Jurado, Maria 562 512 60 

LeClaire (Leclerk), Phil- 
ip (Felipe) 1 .429 441 20 

Lowe, Caroline 675 443 100 

Maldonado. Manuel In 515 416 210 

Martin. William 388 35 

Martinez, Juan 420 125 

Matos. Alberto In 734 405 60 

Matos, Alberto In 734 482 370 

Morilla. Anastasia 687 402 & 403 145 

Mudarra. Maria 732 408 85 

Murgas. Marcelino 441 85 

Murphy. Richard 688 470 55 

Nesler, Carmen S. Guard- 
ian 963 486 710 

Nino. Agapita 518 520 60 



Dockef Boust 

No. No. Amount. 

Or\'ilIe. Boniface 691 497 it 1.705 380 

Ospino. Teresa 903 409 45 

Palma. Tosp 692 & 693 401 & 418 580 

Pardo. Victor 694 432 30 

Pastor. Julio 695 485 & 508 570 

Puella. EmUio 444 25 

Quesada, Isabel 696 491 180 

Quesada. Jose P 697 .396 & 399 315 

Reales, Petra 89 1 449 55 

Reinoso, Juana 521 415 60 

Rod riguez . Clara 512 430 20 

Ruiz, Candelaria 1.210 407 SO 

Salazar, Estebana 705 4VS 25 

Saravia, Manuel 707 & 1.054 452 210 

Sarmiento. Aureliana.. . . -if^* ^5 

Silva, Jose de la Mercedes 968 434 15 

Smith. Dorothy 456 & 457 10 

Smith, Susan -155 60 

Villanueva. Anastasia. . . . 522 & 333 55 

Williams. Thomas 719 405 .509 

& 510 255 

Woo, Vet 495 488 235 

Yong, Ah 501 490 335 

Young. Moses ^^^ ^^l,i 

Grand total $9,910 

(Signed) Federico Boyd. r<oLANn P. Falkner, 
Samuel Lewis. L. S. Rowe. Commtssioners. 
September 22. 1913. 



Award No. 46 — In the matter 0/ sundry claims for 
improvements located near the Mandingo River, docket 
No. 6JS-A, etc. — An a\vard is hereby made against the 
United States in favor of the persons hereinafter named, 
in the sum of S4.400 U. S. currency. 

This award shall be r>aid to the respective claimants 
hereinafter named in the amounts hereinafter specified, 
on or before the 22d day of October. 1913. and if pay- 
ment or tender of payment of any of the items of this 
award is not made on or before that date, such items 
shall thereafter bear interest at the rate of siix per centum 
per annum until paid. 

Miranda. Victor, docket No. 1.592. for all rights, 
claims and other interests in growing crops, fruit trees, 
house, tax No. 1,565. and any other buildings and any 
other improvements which the said Miranda may 
possess on lands located near the Mandingo River, 
about three miles west of Bas Obispo, the sum of 
$800 LT. S. currency. 

To the owners of house No. 1,564, etc.. docket No. 
1.593. for all rights, claims and other interests in 
growing crops, fruit trees, house tax. No. 1.564. aiid 
any other buildings and any other improvements which 
these persons may possess on lands located near the 
Mandingo River about two and one-half miles west 
of Bas Obispo, the sum of $3,600 U. S. currency. 

The foregoing award shall be paid to the owners of 
the property in equal shares, as follows: Catalino 
Miranda. $900: Juan Miranda. $900; Maria Miranda, 
$900: Telefora Miranda. $900. Total. $4,400 U. S. 
currency. 

(Signed) Federico Boyd. Roland P. Falkner, 
Samuel Lewis. L. S. Rowe. Commissioners. 

September 22, 1913- 



Award No. 47 — In the matter of the claim oj Benjamin 
Forbes, for i7nprovements at Matachin, docket No. 618-A 
end 731.— An award is hereby made against the United 
States of America in favor of Benjamin Forbes for all 
rights, claims, and other interests m growing crops, 
fruit trees, houses. Nos. 526. 527, and 528, and any 
other buiHdings or other improvements claimed by the 
said Forbes on the lands of Matachin in the sum of 
$230 U. S. currency. 

The foregoing award is made for two distinct prop- 
erties, as follows: 

First. — For crops and thatched houses situated near 
the road leading from Gorgona to Empire on land 
above the S7-foot level, claimed by the Bosque family, 
in the amount of $125 U. S- currency. 

Second. — For houses, tax numbers 526. 527. and 528 
in the village of Matachin on lands lying below the 
87-foot level, which were conve*-ed to the United 
States by deed of May 3. 1909-. the sum of $105 U._S. 
currency. 

This award shall be paid on or before the 22d day 
of October. 1913, and if payment or tender of payment 
of any of the items of this a\vard be not made on or 
before that date, it shall thereafter bear interest at 
the rate of six per centum per aimum until paid. 

(Sicned) Federico Boyd. Roland P. Falkner, 
Samuel Lewis, L. S. Rowe, Commissioners. 

September 22. 1913. 



Award No. 48 — In the matter o/ the claim of Dan 
Cameron for improvements on latids of Juan Grande 
docket Nos. 532-A and 139. — The evidence in the case 
of Dan Cameron showed that he occupied a piece of 
ground in the lands of Juan Grande in that portion 
of the estate which was purchased by the French 
Canal Company and subsequently became the prop- 
erty of the United States. For the occupancy of these 
lands he had a permit from the Colombian municipality 



12 



THE CANAL RECORD 



Vol. VII, No. <?. 



ofGorgona. tt is in evidence that such permits were 
granted somewhat indiscriminately by the old munici- 
pality and were frequently issued for lands in private 
ownership. Such permits conveyed no t^tle to the land. 

Later, the United States sought to i>lace Cameron 
under a lease, but such lease Cameron refused to sign, 
because of the clauses therein which provided that in 
case the property were taken for public use no com- 
pensation would be made to him for his improvements. 
The United States did not dispossess Cameron, but 
suffered him to remain on the land. The refusal to 
sign the lease, involved a refusal or neglect to pay to 
the United States rent for the land occupied, and the 
Commission finds that Cameron is indebted to the 
United States for the arrears of rent upon the property. 
In making fts award, due allowance has been made for 
the fact of such indebtedness. 

Certain parts of the improvements of Cameron were 
destroyed by the operations of the Isthmian Canal 
Commission and for this he was paid. 

In conformity with the principles formulated by the 
Commission with respect to the right of occupiers on 
the public land to receive compensation for their im- 
provements and the evidence in the case: 

An award is hereby made against the United States 
of America in favor of Dan Cameron for improvements 
near Gorgona. the said award to include all rights, 
claims or other interests in growing crops, fruit trees, 
buildings or any other improvements claimed by the 
said Cameron on any land near the Carabali River, 
or on any part of the original estate of Juan Grande, 
together with all claims of whatsoever nature on account 
of damages alleged to have been suffered by the oper- 
ations of the Isthmian Canal Commission or the Pana- 
ma Railroad Company, this property being distinct 
from that purchased from the claimant by the United 
States in October. 1909. by voucher No. 8007. in the 
sum of $300. U. S. currency. 

This award shall be paid on or before the 22d day 
of October. IQU.and if payment or tender of payment 
is not made on or before that date, it shall bear interest 
at the rate of six per centum per annum until paid. 

(Signed) Fkijerico Boyd. Roland P. Falkner. 
Sa-MUEL Lewis. L. S. Rowe. Commissiongrs. 

September 22. 1913. 

Rules of Dismissal. 

In the matter of sundry claims located as below desig- 
nated docket 1, 340- A. etc. — A number of claims have 
been presented to the Commission for property in- 
cluded between Gatun and Gamboa, for improvements 
below the S7-foot level, some of which are already 
submerged or partly submerged. In preparing for the 
creation of Lake Gatun. many persons were removed 
from time to time from their holdings and with many 
of them settlements were made. Other settlements 
have been made within this area at a more recent date. 

A careful examination has been made of all cases 
in which a payment has been reported, and where there 
was any uncertainty in regard to the property covered 
by the previous payment, the claimant has been given 
the benefit of ever>- reasonable doubt. In the followiu;^ 
cases, the Commission has reached the conclusion that 
the claimants liave no property for which an award 
could be sought from this Commission which is not 
covered by the previous payments hereinafter noted: 

Bell. James William. Docket I.-J4J — The property in- 
cluded in this claim ivas covered by the payment in 
February. 1912. by Voucher 18695. in favor of William 
Bell, for the purchase of hou>c. tax No. 8 and all other 
improvements of every- kind in or near Bohio. Canal 
Zone. 

Campbell. Joseph. Docket 1.4JS — The property m- 
cluded in this claim was covered by the payment in 
December. 191 1. by Voucher I77S4, for the purchase of 
all throwing crops, fruit trees and farm house with 
thatch roof, tax No. 108. and all other improvements, 
situated in the valley of the Chiigres River. 

In view of the payments herein noted, no claim 
again^iit the United States of American can be recog- 
nized by the Joint Commission, and these claims are 
hereby dismissed. 

(Si^^-aed) Federico Boyd. Roland P. Falkner, 
Sa-mvel Lewis, L. S. Rowe, Commisstoners. 

August 30, 1913. 

In the matter of sundry claims, docket I,240-A. etc. — ■ 
With respect to the persons hereinafter named, whose 
claims have been before the Joint Land Commission 
for consideration, the evidence shows that they have 
signed contracts with the Istlimian Canal Commission 
for the sale of the properties claimed by them. The 
names of such persons, the docket numbers of their 
claims, and a description of the property included in 
such claims, follow: 

Campbell. Albert — Docket 1.066. claim for house, tax 
No. 274 and other improvements at Gamboa Hill. 

Cortes. Emilio — Docket 362, claim for house, tax No. 
266 and other improvements at Santa Cruz. 

JederoH, Ambroise (also known as Ambrosio. Gideon, 
and Ambrose, Gideon) — Docket 745. claim for house. 
lax No. 1.836 and ether improvements at Caimito 



Sandiford, Hubert — Claim for house, tax No. 1.835 and 
other improvements at Caimito. 

In view of the agreements before noted, these claims 
call for no further action by the Joint Commission, and 
they are accordingly dismissed. 

(Signed) Federico Boyd, Roland P. Falkner. 
Samuel Lewis. L. S. Rowe. Commissioyiers. 

September 10. 1913. 

/ n the matter of sundry claims in the lands of Malachin 
docket No. 6I8-A, etc. — With respect to the occupiers on 
the lands of Matachin hereinafter named, who for the 
greater part have their improvements on that portion 
of the original estate of Matachin which was pur- 
chased by the French canal company, and subse- 
quently became the property of the United States, the 
evidence before the Commission is tixat they have 
signed contracts with the Isthmian Canal Commission 
for the sale of the houses herein designated by their 
tax numbers, together with all their other improve- 
ments situated on the said lands. The names of such 
persons, the docket numbers of their claims, and the 
tax numbers of their houses, follow: 



Name. 


Docket 

No. 


Tax 

No. 






638 


Alexander, John 


1,553 


1,749 
26 


Angelo. Victor 


553 


345 


Baker. William 


130 


Bennett, Alexander 










171 


Brown, Alexander 




170 




12 
75 


644 


Cabot, Berthe 


646 




347 




1,368 


128 


Clark. William 


129 






19 




728 

1,062 

725 

932 


343 




167 




535 




600 


Falkner, Richard 


28 




795 


1 715 


Finley, Alexander 


33-34 






25 


Foster, James L 




5 






27 


Francis, Joseph 




8 






391 






-549 
7 


Gregoire, Sylvan 


516 


114 




169 


Hines, Samuel 




176 




1,078 


145 


Jackson, Theophilus 


1,725 






20 


Johnson, Amelia 




168 






1,747 






6 




729 
775 

1,209 


389 




595 




-596 
175 




13 


Miller. Alfred 




339 






29 






17 






390 






1,706 


Rivals. Stephen. . .■ 




126 






1,700 


Robinson. Edward 




348 




706 


-349 

572 


Slee. Charles 


1.728 


Small, Matilda •. 




30 






1.705 


Spence, Jacob 




24-31 


Stewart, William 


1,064 


534 


Surprise, Elise 


124 






1,713 


Thomas, Uriah 




342 




1,049 

1,139 


338 




598 


Waith, Alfred 


-607 
-608 
1.714 






353 


Webb, Susan 




IS 






23 


White, Samuel 




IS 



In view of the agreements herein referred to. these 
claims call for no further action by the Commission 
and they are accordingly dismissed. 

(Signed) Fedlrico Boyd, Roland P. Falkner. 
Sa-muel Lewis, L. S. Rowe, Comntissioners. 

September 11, 1913. 

/n the matter of sundry claims, within the lake area, 
docket No. I,240-A — A number of claims have been 
presented for property in the lake area between Gatun 
and Gamboa for properties below the S7-foot level, 
some of which are already submerged or partially sub- 
merged. 

In preparing for the creation of Gatun Lake, many 
persons were removed from time to time from their 
holdings and with many of them settlements were made. 



In February and March, 1912, the Government made 
an examination of this region and an inspection of all 
occupiers. Subsequently, settlements were made with a 
large number of such persons, who executed releases 
and received payments for their houses and all improve- 
ments in the lake area. 

A careful e.xamination has been made of all cases in 
which payment has been reported, and the claimant 
given the benefit of every reasonable doubt. In the 
following cases we have reached the conclusion that the 
claimants have no property which is not covered by the 
previous payment or payments hereinafter noted: 

Aimable. Isidore, docket No. 1,431. the property now 
claimed is covered by the payment in January. 1912. 
by \'oucher 1847S, for houses, tax Nos. 1.151, 1,159. 
1,171 and 1,890. and all other improvements in or near 
the town of TaberniUa. 

Busto, Juan, docket No. 1,351, the property now 
claimed is covered by the payment in April, 1912, by 
Voucher 19503. for two houses and other improvements 
near Limon, Gatun River. 

Curbelo, Josefa. docket No. 171, the property now 
claimed is covered by the payments in November, 1910. 
by the Panama Railroad Company . for improvements on 
Lot 3 belonging to the Panama Railroad Company, and 
in February, 1912, by the Isthmian Canal Commission 
for improvements at Palo Horqueta y Matias. 

McKenzie, Charles, docket No. 1,440, the property 
now claimed is covered by the payment in December. 

1911, by Voucher 17748 to Charles McKenzie and 
Manuela Echeverria, for house, tax No. 98 and other 
improvements in the valley of the Chagres. 

Medina, Juana Josefa. the property now claimed is 
covered by the payment in January. 1912, by Voucher 
18207, for houses, tax Nos. 145 and 149 and other im- 
provements near Bohio. 

MuT/oz, Manuel, docket No. 1,329, the property now 
claimed is covered by the payment in November, 1911. 
by the Panama Railroad Company, for all improve- 
ments in the area below the 87-foot contour line. 

Pasero. Malea. docket No. 857. the property now 
claimed is covered by the payment in December. 1911. 
to James McKenzie, husband of the claimant, for 
houses and other improvements on the lands of Cano 
Quebrado. 

Racine {Racini), Damian, docket No. 525. the proper- 
ty now claimed is covered by the purchase by the 
United States of certain improvements in the Canal 
prism, near TaberniUa. in December, 1909. 

Rosemont, Touissant, docket No. 1,457, the property 
now claimed is covered by the payment in January. 

1912, by Voucher 18289. for houses, tax Nos. 61. 75, 
141. 142. and 160. and other improvements in or near 
the town of Bohio. 

In view of the payments herein noted, no claim 
against the United States can be recognized by the 
Joint Land Commission, and these claims are hereby 
dismissed. 

tSigncd) Federico Bo\'D, Roland P. Falkner. 
Samuel Lewis, L. S. Rowe. Commissioners. 

September 22. 1913. 



In the matter of sundry claims, in the valley of the 
Trinidad River, docket No. 1,244-A, etc-, — A number of 
claims have been presented to the Commission for 
properties below the 87-foot level, some of which are 
already submerged or p^tly submerged. In preparing 
for the creation of Gatun Lake, many persons were 
removed from time to time from their holdings, and with 
many of them settlements were made. Other settle- 
ments have been made within this area at a more recent 
date. 

A careful examination has been made of all cases in 
which a payment has been reported, and where there 
was any uncertainty in regard to the property covered 
by the previous payment, the claimant has been given 
the benefit of every reasonable doubt. In the follow- 
ing cases the Commission has reached the conclusion 
that the claimant has no property for which an award 
could be sought from this Commission, which is not 
covered by the previous payments hereinafter noted: 

Chansing, Ramon, docket No. 16t. the property in- 
cluded in this claim was covered by payment in No- 
vember. 1910. by the Panama Railro.id Company for 
his improvements in the valley of the Trinidad River. 

Esperadeati. Julio, docket No. 1.115. the property 
included in this claim was covered by the payment in 
April, 19U, by the Panama Railroad Company for 
house and other improvements in the valley of the 
Trinidad River. 

Rodriguez, JosS de los Santos, docket No. 176. the 
property included in this claim is below the 87-foot 
level and is covered by a purchase made by the United 
States in making settlement for improvements in the 
valley of the Trinidad River. 

Torres. Pedro, docket No. ISO, the property included 
in this claim was covered by the payment in October, 
1911. by Voucher 16972 for fruit trees and other im- 
provements in the valley of the Trinidad River. 

In view of the payments herein noted, no claim 
against the United States can be recognized by the 
Joint Land Commission, and these claims are hereby 
dismissed. 

(Signed) Fedf.rico Boyd, Roland P. Falkner, 
Samuel Lewis. L. S. Rowe. Commissioners. 

September 16, 1913. 



Octobtr 15, 1913. 



THE CANAL RECORD 



73 



PASSING OF HISTORIC TOWN. 



Crucea, One of the Oldest Settlements on the 
Isthmus, Abandoned 

The village of Cruces, situated on the south 
bank of the Chagres River, a little above 
Gamboa, will be abandoned, and the Division 
of Police and Prisons has been instructed to 
destroy the buildings, when the town has been 
depopulated. Most of the buildings, which 
arebuilt after the native style, bamboo walls, 
with roofs of thatch, are below the 87-foot 
contour. The number of houses in the village, 
according to the tax records of 1910 was 60, 
not including the church and schoolhouse, 
but some of these were burned in the fire of 
1912. The Canal Zone census of 1912 showed 
169 people living there, consisting of 132 
colored persons, 36 of mixed blood, and one 
white. 

Cruces is one of the oldest settlements on 

the Isthmus, and in earlier times was known 

as Venta Cruz. One of the contemporary 

books on the Canal and the Isthmus describes 

its origin, as follows: 

"The first transit route across the Isthmus, for 
the transportation of gold, silver, and merchandise 
from the various Spanish colonies on the Pacific 
to Spain, ran from the city of Panama to N'ombre 
de Dios, on the shores of the Caribbean. It was 
cut through the forest and jungle, over mountain 
tops and across mountain streams, and was rough- 
ly paved with stones. It ran from Panama in a 
northeasterly direction for about 20 miles to a 
point on the Chagres River, which was given the 
name of Venta Cruz, afterward changed to Cruces. 
Thence it extended northward to Nombre de Dies. 
A line of posts was established along the route. 
It was put in use in 1519. and was the sole route 
between the two oceans until about 1535. when tlie 
Chagres between Venta Cruz and the Atlantic. 
a distance of about 36 miles, was made navigable 
for boats of light draft, and a water route was es- 
tablished betw-een \'enta Cruz and Nombre de 
Dios. The land route between these points was 
not abandoned, however, but continued to be used 
in connection with the water route. So well was 
the paving laid that parts of it remain in position 
today, and the entire trail from Panama City to 
Cruces is open, and is used by the natives as a 
highway for pack mules and ponies." 

Dr. E. L. Auchenrieth in his book entitled 

The Topography oj the Isthmus, published in 

1851, speaks of the paved trail, as follows: 

"It is stated that Francisco Pizarro, the con- 
queror of Peru, was the one that ordered the paving 
of the road, which was done with large, round 
stones sometimes a foot and a half in diameter." 

A toll gate is said 'to have been set up at 
Cruces in the latter half of the eighteenth 
century, and all traffic between the two oceans 
passed the place. According to the report 
made by Bancroft on the fiscal regulations and 
commercial decline of the Spanish colonies, 
goods to the amount of 1,466,346 pesos de oro 
were registered as passing through the Casa 
at Cruces, while more than seven and one- 
half millions were smuggled across. 
; In their march from Fort San Lorenzo, at 
the mouth of the Chagres River, to attack 
Old Panama, Henry Morgan and his men 
ascended the river to Cruces. Esquemeling 
speaks of it, as follows: 

" * * * Thus they proceeded on their 
ioumey till noon, at which time they arrived at a 
village called Crui. * * * This village 
is seated in the latitude of nine degrees and two 
minutes north, being distant from the Fort of 
Chagre 26 Spanish leagues, and eight from Panama. 
Moreover, it is the last place to which boat5 or 
canoes can come, for which reason they built 
here storehouses, wherein to keep all kinds of 
merchandise, which hence to and from Panama are 
transported upon the backs of mules." 

Messrs. Sosa and Atce, local historians, 
note that the Chagres River was first ex- 
plored from its mouth to the interior, prob- 
ably to about where Cruces now is, by Capt. 
Hernando de la Serna, and the pilot Pablo 
Corzo, between April 3 and 10, 1527. 

Following the construction of the Panama 



railroad, Cruces entered upon a period of de- 
cadence, which has existed until this day. The 
Canal Commission has never instituted any 
changes there beyond including it within the 
Canal Zone school system. In May, 1906, ar- 
rangements were made to open a school in 
the old church, and the municipality of Gor- 
gona was authorized to expend S500 in im- 
proving the building. The church was 25 
feet wide by 63 feet long, and it was estimated 
that it afforded sufficient accommodations 
for 100 children. School was opened in 1906, 
and has been continued ever since. On Febru- 
ary 16, 1909, the citizens of the village 
addressed a memorial to the governor of the 
Canal Zone, asking him to cause the school to 
be removed to some other point in the village 
as the church was needed for religious pur- 
poses. This request was not acceded to, but 
the people were allowed to use the building on 
Sundays and feast days. In 1910. the church 
became unsafe, and on November 22 of that 
year a request was approved for a new school- 
house, with a living room for the teacher. It 
was built on the highest knoll in the village, 
at elevation 101 feet, on land originalh- deeded 
to the French Canal Company. In the school 
year 1909-10, the highest enrollment was 
20, and the average daily attendance 15.5. 
During the last school year the enrollment 
was37,andtheaveragedaily attendance 13.9. 
The instruction has been in Spanish, although 
if the school had been continued another year, 
English would have been substituted. 

Prior to 1911, the village had a historic 
curiosity in the shape of two wrought iron 
anchors. According to tradition, these an- 
chors were brought up the Chagres River in 
boats for transport overland to Panama, but 
the plan was abandoned at Cruces. One of 
these anchors stood in the village about 300 
yards from the river, and the other alongside 
the trail about 400 yards from the river. 
Each anchor has a 14-foot shank. The idea 
was conceived by Lieut. Walter D. Smith, 
formerly Constructing Quartermaster of the 
Canal Commission, to send these anchors to 
West Point. The anchors were placed on a 
raft, which subsequently broke loose from its 
moorings, and after floating down the river a 
short distance, collided with a log, breaking 
in two, and allowing the anchors to go to the 
bottom of the stream. They were recovered 
later, but before they could be placed on 
board a vessel, a cable message was recei\-ed 
by the Chairman from the Secretary of War 
disapproving of the plan. The anchors are 
now in the yards of the general storehouse at 
Mount Hope. 

Cruces also possesses another relic in three 
ancient church bells. These bells are of vary- 
ing size, and from one of them a piece has been 
broken. The dates are indistinguishable, but 
they are known to be very old. After the 
transfer of the anchors, the inhabitants, be- 
coming apprehensive that the bells also would 
be taken, had them removed and hidden. 
Later, when these fears were dispelled, they 
were returned to their old place. 

Mr. Wolfred Nelson, the author of Five 
Years at Panama, published in 1889, records 
that the stone church at Cruces was destroyed 
in the earthquake of September 7, 1882. 



RULES AND REGULATIONS 

Prohibiting the Passage or Presence of Floating 
Craft, except those belonging to the United 
States or the Panama Railroad, in that section 
of the Panama Canal known as Culebra Cut 
between Gamboa and Pedro Miguel Lock. 

By authority of the President of the United 
States, as expressed in Executive Order of July 
25, 1910, the following rules and regulations 
are adopted by the Isthmian Canal Commis- 
sion for the purpose of facilitating work of 
excavation and Canal construction, and the 
same shall have the force and effect of law 
when appro\ed by the Secretar>' of War. 

Section 1. Without special permission in 
writing, signed by the Chairman of the Isth- 
mian Canal Commission, no owner, master, 
or operator of any floating craft of any kind or 
character whatsoever, except such as may 
belong to or be chartered by the United 
States or the Panama Railroad Company, shall 
cause or permit such craft to enter, navigate, 
or be present within that portion of the Pana- 
ma Canal known as the Culebra Cut, which 
lies between Gamboa and Pedro Miguel Lock. 

Section 2. For the better enforcement of 
these rules and regulations the officers and 
agents of the United States and the assistant 
engineers, superintendents, and supervisors 
employed under them by the authority of the 
Isthmian Canal Commission, shall have power 
and authority to arrest and take into custody, 
with or without process, any person or per- 
sons who may commit any of the acts or 
offenses prohibited by Section 1 of these 
rules and regulations, or who may violate any 
of the provisions of the same. 

Section 3. As ordered by the President of 
the United States, any person violating the 
provisions of these rules and regulations shall 
beguilty of a misdemeanor, and on conviction 
thereof shall be punished by a fine not to ex- 
ceed five hundred dollars ($500) or by im- 
prisonment in the district jail for not more 
than six months, or by both such fine and 
imprisonment, in the discretion of the Court. 

Approved : 

LiNDLEY M. Garrison, 
Secretary of War. 

October 3, 1913. 



Obituary. 

Mary Jane, the five-year old daughter of 
Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Lenzen, residing at 
Ancon, died at Ancon Hospital on Thursday, 
October 9. 



More Tremors Recorded. 

LTp to Monday, October 13, there had been 
32 movements recorded on the seismograph 
at the Ancon station in the present series 
of seismic disturbances. During the past 
week there has been only one pronounced 
shock, that which began at 7.46 p. m., on 
Saturday, October 11, the duration of which 
according to the average individual per- 
ceptibility was from five to seven seconds. 
The instrument registered a maximum ampli- 
tude of 45 millimeters, and the location, as 
indicated by the instruments, was the same as 
most of the others, namely, a point about 115 
miles to the southwest. 

The Central and South American Cable 
Company's cable repair ship Guardian, Cap- 
tain Taylor, arrived oft" Panama on Sun- 
day, October 12, having succeeded in repair- 
ing the cable which broke a few hours after 
the shock of Wednesday night, October 1. 
The trouble was located in the vicinity of the 
small islands known as Frailes del Norte and 
Frailes del Sur, about 15 miles off the coast 
of Los Santos province, and not far from the 
village of Tonosf. The cable at this point 
was down about 800 fathoms. It is believed 
that the break was caused by the earthquake 



74 ■ 



THE CANAL RECORD 



Vol. VII, No. 8. 



shock, as the company's records show that 
the cable has broken twice before in the same 
place, once during'the severe shock of Septem- 
ber 7, 1882. The splice that was made at that 
time was broken on this occasion. The recent 
shocks apparently disturbed the ocean bed in 
the vicinitv of the break, for a section of the 
cable about half a mile long was found deeply 
imbedded in a mass of hard clay, and was ex- 
tricated with considerable difficulty. 

The Secretary of PubUc Works of the Re- 
public of Panama has received the following 
telegram from Mr. D. F. McDonald, the 
Commission geologist, and Mr. W. C. John- 
ston, assistant chief engineer of the govern- 
ment, dated Tonosi, October 11: 

"The greater part of the houses in Tonosi have 
been damaged, and many roofs have fallen in. 
Two distUleries have been destroyed, as well as 
the ovens in the bakeries. Fragile articles, such 
as crockery, glassware, etc.. in stores and houses 
have been broken. There have been numerous 
slides in the neighboring mountains and cracks 
have opened in the ground in all the valley ot 
Tonosi. None of the hills. howe\er. have sunk, and 
the area inundated by the rise in the rivers is not 
extensive. The inhabitants are alarmed, and are 
living in tents. Small shocks are experienced daily, 
accompanied by a rumbling like thunder The 
nresent disturbances will probably result m a 
loss of crops, and an increase in sickness, on ac- 
count of exposure and frigh.;." 
Another telegram sent by Messrs. Mc- 
Donald and Johnston from Las Tablas on 
October 13 stated that on the 12th inst., at 
5.30 in the afternoon three shocks were ex- 
perienced in the same number of minutes. 
The people in that village have also resorted 

to the use of tents. 

-♦ 

SOCIAL LIFE OF THE ZONE. 

Church Notes. 
The quarterly convention of the Isthmian 
Sunday School Association will be held at 
the Commission clubhouse in Corozal on 
Sunday afternoon, October 19, at 2.30 o'clock. 
The Reverend Carl H. Elliott, pastor of the 
Cristobal Union Church, will speak on the 
subject, "What is a good Sunday school?" 
There will also be addresses by Mrs. Harry 
Compton, head of the Methodist mission 
school in Panama, and Mr. H. S Higgins 
of Culebra. The superintendent of each of 
the federated Sunday schools will speak five 
minutes on " How to keep a good Sunday school 
on the Isthmus." There will be special 
music. This is the first convention to be 
held under the new officers who are, as follows : 
President, J. M. Weaver; vice-president, 
J. F. Warner; secretary, W. F. Kromer; 
treasurer, W. E. Hoffman. 

The American Woman's Altar Society of 
St. Ferdinand's Church, Empire, will hold 
a euchre party in the parish hall on Saturday 
evening, October 18. Prizes will be given. 
Tickets for admission are on sale at 50 

cents gold. 

♦ 

Society of the Chagres. 

In accordance with Article 16 of the con- 
stitution of the Society of the Chagres, nom- 
inations for officers to serve from the third 
Saturday in January, 19U, to the third 
Saturday in January, 1915, are now in order. 

The attention of the members is directed 
to Article 5, which provides that no officer 
who has sep.-ed one full term shall be eligible 
for reelection for the next ensuing term, with 
the exception of the secretary-treasurer. The 
present officers of the society are: President, 
Col. W. C. Gorgas; vice president, Mr. R. H. 
Wardlaw; secretary-treasurer, Mr. W. F. 
Shipley; members of executive committee. 



Messrs. Dan E. Wright, H. S. Parish, 
Gerald D. Bliss, and Charles L. Parker. 

Article 5. The officers of the society shall be a 
president, a vice-president, a secretary -treasurer, and 
an executive committee, consisting of the foregoing; 
and four other members. No salaries shall be paid 
to the officers, and, excepting the secretary-treasurer, 
no officer who has served one full term shall be eligible 
for reelection for the next ensuing term. 

■Article 16. Any ten members may nominate a 
fellow member for election to any of the offices of the 
society, but all such nominations must be submitted 
to the secretar>'-treasurer in writing not later than 
October 31. As soon as possible, but in any event not 
later" than November 15, the secretary-treasurer shall 
prepare and mail to each member of the society a ballot 
containing the names of all candidates nominated for 
each office. At the annual meeting of the society, the 
vote cast by letter ballot shall be canvassed, and those 
candidates receiving a plurality of the votes shall be 
declared elected. William F. Shipley, 

Secretary-Treasurer. 

Cristobal, C. Z., October 13, 1913. 

. — * ■ 

The New .\merican Minister. 

Mr. William Jennings Price, the new Amer- 
ican minister, was officially received by Presi- 
dent Porras in the yellow room at the 
Presidencia at 10 a. m., on Saturday, October 
11, in the presence of the entire government 
cabinet. Mr. Price studied for the- bar and 
was graduated from Centre College, Danville, 
Ky. In 1900, he was a Democratic presi- 
dential elector from that state, and was alter- 
nate delegate at large to the Denver conven- 
tion in 1906. He was twice elected prose- 
cucing attorney, and altogether has been 
elected to public office five different times. 
He was a member of the faculty of the 
College of Law of Central University, Dan- 
ville, for several years, is a member of the 
bar of the United States Supreme Court, and 
is one of the proprietors of the Kentucky 
Daily Advocate. The appointment to his 

present post was unsolicited. 

— * 

National Revolver and Pistol Match. 

An open revolver and pistol championship 
match was held under the auspices of the 
Culebra Pistol Club at the range in Culebra, 
September 27 to October 5, both dates in- 
clusive. The match was shot under the rules 
of the United States Revolver Association, and 
was held simultaneously with matches at 
different ranges in the United States. The 
standard American target with 8-inch bulls- 
eye was used. There were four events, all at 
50 yards. The winners of the matches and 
scores were, as follows: 

Match A. 
(Fifiy shots with any revolver; possible score 500) 
First — Jacob Bernson, 435, gold and silver medal. 
Second — M. W. Fox, 400. silver medal. 
Third — M. E. Woodward, 386, bronze medal. 
Match B. 
(Fifty shots with any pistol; possible score 500) 
First — Jacob Bernson, 439, gold and silver medal. 
Second — M. W. Fox, 436, silver medal. 
Third — M. E. Woodward, 40S, bronze medal. 

M.«CH C. 
{Rapid fire military revolver, 75 shots each, fire shots in 

15 seconds; possible score 750) 
First — Jacob Bernson. 500, gold and silver medal. 
Second — C. B. Larzelere, 448. silver medal. 
Third — M. E. Woodward. 409. bronze medal. 

Match F. 
(Time fire, pocket revolver, 25 shots each, five shots in 30 

seconds; possible score 250) 
First — M. W. Fox. 179, gold and silver medal. 
Second — Jacob Bernson. 173. silver medal. 
Third — C. B. Larzelere. 170, bronze medal. 

♦ 

Missing Men. 

Any one having information of the follow- 
ing named men, who are supposed to be on 
the Isthmus, are requested to communicate 
with the American Legation, Panama: Mr. 
William Stevenson, or W. L. Stevenson; 
Mr. Simon Weinfeld, and Mr. Lee Gordon. 



COMMISSIO N CL UBHOUSES. 

Activities of the Young Men's Christian Auocta- 
tlon. 

GENERAL. 

The moving picture schedule for the week October 
20 to 25 is. as follows; Tuesday. Gatun; Wednesday. 
Cristobal; Thursday, Empire; Friday, Culebra and 
Porto Bello; Saturday, Corozal. 

The standing of the ten high men in the bowling 
tournament for the first three games rolled October 4 is. 
aa follows: O'Meara, King, Davis. BuUard, Cashing, 
Dougherty, Barte, Parkis, Peterson. Gustavson. 

The standing of the teams in the chess tournament. 
October 11. was. as follows: Culebra. won 6 points; 
Ciistobal. won 5 pomts; Gatun, won 3 points. 

The standing of the teams in the basketball league. 
October 11, was, as follows: 

Team. Won. Lost. P. C. 

Gatun 3 .... .... 1.000 

Empire 3 .... .... 1.000 

Camp Elliott 2 1 666 

Culebra i 2 333 

Cristobal .... 3 000 

Corozal .... 3 000 

The standing, of the teams in the bowling tournament 
was. as follows: 

Team. Won. Lost. P. C. 

Cristobal , S 1 833 

Empire 4.... 2 667 

Culebra 3 3 500 

Corozal 3 .... 3 500 

Camp Elliott 0.... 3 000 

Gatun .... 3 000 

COROZAL. 

The following high scores were made on the local 
alleys: Tenpins — Taylor. 205, 204; Edwards. 235; 
Parkis. 233. Duckpins — Davis, 104. 101; Sammeting- 
er, 116; Beall. 105. 102. 

The Camp Elliott basketball team defeated the local 
team on Wednesday. October 8. by a score of 20 to 15. 

Corozal lost to Empire Saturday night. October 11, 
in basketball, by the score of 5S to 14. Sperber. Coro- 
zal s fonvard was unable to play either of the above 
games, and Carr was unable to play in the game with 
Empire. 

CULEBRA. 

In the recent local bowling tournament the order of 
the high averages was. as follows: Dougherty. Ander- 
son, Case, DeCora, Hobbs. Tragsdorf, Comthwaite. 
Hill, Herrington, Schmeck. 

Recent high scores in tenpins were, as follows: Case. 
205. 222. 201. 201, 207; Chadbourne, 202; 201; Fer- 
guson, 200; Comthwaite. 226; Tragsdorf, 207; Mengel 
223. 

In the league game with Empire on Friday night, in 
tenpins, the local team won two out of three games: 
Empire. Culebra. 

Gustavson.. 189 204 138 Case 138 158 166 

Potter ... 176 165 209 Gushing 187 166 191 

Peterson.... 148 151 193 Mengel 166 223 133 

Boeson 132 193 188 DeCora 1/0 125 139 

Huson 177 137 ... Dougherty.. 183 180 188 

Sims 177 

Totals.... 822 850 905 844 852 817 

Gatun defeated the Culebra basketball team on the 
Empire floor on Saturday night. October 11. by the 
score of 34 to 17. The line-ups were: 

Culebra — Hepler, Gushing, forwards; Chadbourne, 
center; Rose. Gassmann, guards. 

C:a(„„_Huber, Wright, forwards; Fltz. center; 
Connolly, Mitchell, guards. 

An "old-timer" after an absence ot three years, gave 
a talk at the Sunday night service on "The men and 
religion" movement that has been in progress in the 
United States for the last two years. 

Moving pictures will be shown on Saturday night, 
October 18. 

Arrangements are being made for a "Smoker to be 
held in the schoolhouse on Monday night. October 20. 
A wrestling match has been arranged, and an interesting 
program is promised. Refreshments will be served. 
All men are invited. 

EMPIRE. 

The Cristobal bowling team will bowl the local team 
on Saturday. October 18. On Wednesday. October 8. 
the Empire basketball team defeated the Culebra team 
by the score of 53 to 19 on the Empire floor. The 
Empire team will play at Gatun on Saturday, October 
18. ^ ^ 

The Empire debating club will meet on Tuesday 
evening, October 17. The subject is "Resolved that 
the umvritten law be not recognized by the courts." 
The speakers for the aflttrmative will be Messrs. Peter- 
son and DeBarrows; for the negative. Messrs Swanson 
and Morrison. The public is mvited. 

A special moving picture show was given on Monday 
October 13, for the benefit of the night men employed 
at Empire shops. 

On the evening of Tuesday, October 21 a "Smoker" 
Kill b9 held at the Empire clubhouse. In addition to a 



October 15, 1913. 



THE CANAL RECORD 



75 



vaudeville program. Mr. VV. W. Warwick, assistant 
comptroller of the United States Treasury, will make 
an address. The men of Empire are invited. 

GATUN. 

A pair of bowling shoes will be given as prize to the 
person obtaining the highest average in 15 consecutive 
games of tenpins between October 11 and November 1. 
The same prize will be offered the person obtaining the 
highest average in IS consecutive games of duckpins. 

A ladies' bowling contest will be held on Wednesday, 
October IS. There will be two contests — "Open" and 
"Married." 

Considerable interest is being taken in the local 
chess tournament. 

The handicap pool tournament was brought to a 
close on Saturday evening. October 11. H. E. Dewey 
was awarded first prize. John Pettit, second prize, and 
L. Townrley third prize. 

Moving pictures will be shown at Gatun on Friday 
night. October 17. 

Gatun meets the strong Empire team in basketball 
on the home floor on Saturday evening. October IS. 
Both teams have percentages of 1.000 in the leagje 
standing, and a closely contested game is expected. 
Members and their lady friends are invited. 

CRISTOBAL. 

Much interest in basketball is being manifested. 
A 6-team local league has been organized, captained 
by Messrs. Whitver, Wechsler, Ward. Barcroft, Luce, 
and Purvis. The first game was played on Monday, 
October 13. 

Sixty-four books have been added to the library this 
month. 

The results in the local chess tournament for the 
month of September are, as follows: 

Player. Games played. Won. Lost. P. C. 

Ogden 17 .... 13^.... 3} 794 

Tavlor 19 . . . . 14 . . . . 5 737 

Wilson 20 12 8 600 

Hurt 12 7 S 583 

McQueen 10 5 5 500 

Salzburg 20 . . . . 9 .... 11 450 

V^emer 18 8 10 444 

Tuttle 14 6 8 429 

Rattiner 10 35 65 350 

Wechsler 13 4 9 308 

Martin 14 . . . . 4 .... 10 286 

Gill 2 2.. .000 

Cristobal took two out of three games from t he Coro - 
zal tenpin team on Saturday, October 11. The scores 
follow: 

Cristobal. Corozal. 

Barrett 199 169 166 Davis 146 1S7 ... 

Bamum 180 15S 131 . Bordt 144 

Collins 160 149 ... Parkis 204 145 187 

Barte 201 165 211 Edwards... 146 175 ISS 

Bullard 166 180 178 King 149 169 161 

Russell 145 Louch 155 182 

ZUIer 185 



Totals.... 906 821 831 • 789 801 870 

Culebra took all games in the chess tournament on 
Saturday. October 1 1 , as follows: 

Cristobal. Lost. Culebra. Won. 

Hurt 2 Dubois 2 

Taylor 2 McClure 1 

Wilson 2 A. W. Warner 1 

J. E. Warner 2 

Totals 6 6 

Mr. and Mrs. Raymond Bell proved victors in the 
"Married folks" tournament in duckpins held on Mon- 
day, October 7, by the close margin of two pins. The 
totals were, as follows: Mr. and Mrs. R. Bell. 506: 
Mr. and Mrs. J. W. Landers. 504; Mr. and Mrs. Samuel 
Sloan. 478; Mr. and Mrs. G. C. Lucas, 467; Mr. and 
Mrs. C. Cotton, 438. 



Tide Table. 

The following table shows the time of high and low 
tide at Panama for week ending October 25, 1913: 



Date. 


Low 


High 


Low 


High 


Oct. 19 


A.M. 


A.M. 
S.37 
6.14 
6 57 
7.47 
8.49 
10.07 

11 30 


P.M. 
12 04 
12.45 
1.30 
2 23 
3.28 
4.43 

5.56 


P.M. 
6.04 


Oct. 20 

Oct. 21 

Oct. 22 


12.17 

12.59 

l.SO 

2 53 

4 12 

5 28 


6.14 
7.32 
8 28 


Oct. 23 

Oct. 24 

Ort. 25 


9.40 
10.59 



75th meridian time. 



Married. 

HE.A.RNE-SHRADER— On Friday. October 10. at 
the home of Dr. Matthew Hoey on Culebra Island, 
E^nama Bay. Misa Ora E. Shrader of North Yakima, 
Wash., to Dr. Charles A. Hearae 'of Cristobal. Rev. 
C. W. Ports of the seawall Methodist Church, Panama. 
officiating. '<Canal Zone residence.fCri3t0bal.~cr Z.' 



OFFICIAL CIRCULARS. 

Toro Point, to be a Military Reservation. 

Culebra. C. Z.. October 8. 1913. 
Circular No. 435-a. 

Effective October 20. 1913, the entire district of 
Toro Point is designated a military reservation. 

No persons except employes of the Atlantic Division, 
the Fortification Division and ■ their families now 
quartered nt Toro Point, will be permitted to land there, 
except under the provisions of Circular No. 435, dated 
March 19, 1912. 

Passes will be issued from the fortification office at 
Culebra. which will include transportation on the 
tugs, and will be signed only by the Chairman and 
Chief Engineer or by the assistant engineer in charge 
of fortifications. The issuing of passes by the Atlantic 
Division or by the Sixth Division for tug transportation 
will be discontinued. 

Time inspectors, machinists, and other Commission 
employes who are obliged to visit Toro Point during 
working hours on official business will obtain trans- 
portation passes from the fortification office at Cris- 
tobal. 

The chief of police will take such steps as may be 
required to enforce the above. 

Geo. W. Goethals. 
Chairman and Chief Engineer. 



Culebra. C. Z.. March 19, 1912. 
Circular No. 435: 

With a view of preventing, as far as practicable, 
visitors from obtaining information relative to the 
military defenses under construction on the Canal Zone, 
which might be communicated to a foreign power, the 
following regulations governing visitors to such defense 
reservations are hereby published, in accordance with 
Paragraph 358. Army Regulations: 

1. Persons who are not employed in connection 
with fortification work will not be permitted to 
visit military- defense reservations on which active 
construction operations have begun, except as 
provided in Paragraphs 2 and 3 hereof. 

2. Officers of the U. S. Army, Navy and Marine 
Corps, who can conclusively prove their identity 
as such, will be permitted to visit such reservations. 

3. Other American citizens will be permitted to 
visit such reservations only when provided with 
passes, which will, under exceptional circumstances 
be issued by the Chairman and Chief Engineer of 
tlie Isthmian Canal Commission, or by the assist- 
ant engineer in charge of the construction of 
fortifications. 

4. Superintendents, assistant engineers, super- 
visors, foremen, and all other employes in charge 
of the several units and batteries under con- 
struction, are hereby directed to prevent the visits 
of all unauthorized persons and to treat such per- 
sons as trespassers. 

H. F. Hodges. 
Acting Chairman and Chi r^f Engineer. 



Transfer of Lock Work. 

Culebra, C. Z., October 11. 1913. 
Circular No. 504: 

Effective October 15. 1913. the Gatun Locks, ex- 
clusive of the backfill, will be transferred from the 
Atlantic Division to the First Division, Chief Engi- 
neer's Office. On the same date the Pedro Miguel and 
Mirafiores Locks, exclusive of the backfill, will be 
transferred from the Fifth Division to the First Divi- 
sion. Chief Engineer's Office. 

Geo. W. Goethals, 
Chairman and Chief Engineer. 



Chanties in Transportation Department. 

Culebra, C. Z., October 7, 1913, 
To .4.11 Concerned—Effective October 11, 1913, Mr. 
W. J. Holmes is appr.nted superintendent of trans- 
portation, as provided for by Circular 183-Z-l of 
September 27, and Mr. W. T. Snyder is appointed as- 
sistant superintendent ' f transportation. 

H. H. Rous=EAU, 
Approved; Assistnit to the Chief Engineer, 

Geo. W. Goethals. 

Chairman and Chief Engineer. 



Acting Division Engineer, Atlantic Division. 

Culebra, C. Z., October 1 1, 1913. 
CiRCULAi? No. 5C2: 

Effecti\e October 13, 1913. and during the absence 
of Lieuienant-Cobnel William L. Sibert on leave, 
Lieutenant-Colonel William V. Judson will act as 
division engineer of the Atlantic Division. 

Geo. W. Goethals. 
Chairman and Chief Engineer. 



general superintendent during the absence of Mr. 
John D. Patterson on leave. 

Geo. VV. Goethals. President. 



Acting Chief Sanitary Officer. 

Culebra, C. Z.. October 13. 1913. 

Circular No. 508: 

Effective this date, and during the absence of 
Colonel W. C. Gorgas on leave. Colonel John L. 
Phillips is designated as acting chief sanitary officer. 
Geo. W. Goethals. Chairman. 

Amendment to Timekeeping Rules. 

Empire, C. Z., September 29, 1913. 
Circular No. 19: 

Section J12-A — Effective October 1, J 913, time 
vouchers for silver employes prepared and signed by 
bonded timekeepers and approved by proper officers 
will be paid upon presentation diiec. to the Disbursing 
Officer at Empire, or at either of the two pay offices. 
The bonded timekeeper issuing a time voucher to a 
silver employe will complete it by filling in the receipt 
portion. and before delivery- to the employe.it will be 
checked by another bonded employe if one is available, 
who will indicate that he has checked it by his signa- 
ture under the work "Checked." Time vouchers pre- 
sented for payment must nou show alterations or 
erasures of any kind. 

Section II^'B — A list in duplicate of silver time 
vouchers issued will be prepared daily and one copy 
forwarded to the Examiner of Accoun..s and the other 
to the Disbursing Officer immediately. 

H. A. A. Smith. 

Approved : Examiner of Accounts. 

Geo. W. Goethals. 

Chairman and Chief Engineer, 



Aciing General Superintendent, P. R. R. 

CtXEBEA. C. Z.. October 13. 1913. 
Circular No. 506: 

Eflfective this date. Lieutenant F. Mearg will act as 



Supplies for the Canal. 

The following steamers with supplies for the Isth- 
mian Canal Commission and Panama Railroad Com- 
pany, arrived at the ports of Balboa. Colon, and Cris- 
tobal, during the week ending October 4: 

Allianca, September 28, from New York, with 844 
pieces pipe, for Sixth Division; 13 cases fire brick. 40 
pieces castings, 17 pieces castings, for Mechanical 
Division; 116 cases signal material, for Panama Rail- 
road Company; 27 cases castings. 257 bundles steel, 
for First Division; 4.406 pieces lumber. 337 bundles 
lumber, 37 boxes harness. 350 drums lubricating oil, 
30 kegs bolts. 57 bundles galvanized iron, for stock; 
and a miscellaneous cargo, consisting of 2,980 pieces, 
weighing 179 tons. 

Emil L. Boas. September 28. from New York, with 
158 crates fire brick, for Mechanical Division; 154 
pieces pipe, 10 barrels salt, for stock. 

Pleiades, September 29. from San Francisco, with 
six pieces spud timbers, 30 bales rubber hose, for Sixth 
Divison; 2.100 cases dynamite, for stock. 

Tenadores, September 28, from Nw York, with 283 
pieces and t%vo cases structural steel, for Panama 
Railroad Company; 274 steel plates, for Second Divi- 
sion; 207 steel plates, for Empire shops; 53 nieces. 
10 bundles, three kegs steel, 165 I-beams, 10 crates 
electrical machineo'. 5.400 pieces conduit, 104 pieces, 
and 285 bundles structural steel, for First Division; 
12 cases copper nails, for Fifth Division. 

Parisfnina, September 29, from New Orleans, with 
98 pieces lumber, for Sixth Division; 3.463 sacks 
creosoted blocks, 1.132 barrels paving brick, for 
Second Division; 30 rolls fence wire, for Sanitary 
Department; S4I pieces lumber. 928 bales hay, for 
stock. 

Aiichencrag, October 1, from New York, with 10 
cases ether, for Sanitarj- Department; 32.312 barrels 
cement, 189 drums gasoline. 10 cases benzine, for stock. 

Ancon, October 2. from New York, with 500 bags 
white cement, for administration building; 10 
bo.xes mining machiner>- for Empire shops: 809 
pieces structural steel. 10 reels copper wire. 44 steel 
plates, 23 cases machinery, for First Division; 192 
pieces steel piling, for Second Division; 74 pieces cast- 
ings, etc, 241 bundles bar steel, for fortifications; 
34 pieces pipe, for Fifth Di\ision; 114 barrels leadite. 
483 bundles bar steel, for Division of Municipal Engi- 
neering: 208 kegs rivets, for Mechanical Division; 
20.999 barrels cement. 342 pieces pipe. 569 bundles 
galvanized sheets, 900 kegs wire nails, 62 kegs bolts, for 
stock; and a miscellaneous cargo, the whole consist- 
ing of 5,154 pieces, weighing 700 tons. 

Colon. October 3, from New York, with 68 boxes 
lamps, 30 boxes forgings. for Mechanical Division; 
37 boxes lamps. 1.145 pieces structural material, for 
First Division; 27 cases water meters, for Division of 
Municipal Engineering; 9.2S6 pieces hollow tile, for 
^econd Division; 143 pieces signal material for Panama 
llailroad Company; 10 boxes varnish. 146 cases plumb- 
ing material, 40 cases paint. 50 cases varnish, for stock; 
and a miscellaneous cargo, the whole consisting of 
11.259 pieces, weighing 283 tons. 

Almirante, October 1. from New York with 124 
pieces bridge iron, for First Division; 1.482 pieces steel 
plates, for Second Division; 20 bales hose. 12 cases 
pads. 14 cases paint, for slock. 

Atenas. October 2. from New Orleans, with 2.376 
sacks creosoted blocks, for Second Division; 390 
sacks feed. 902 pieces lumber, for stock. 

Sosua, October 2. from Port Bolivar, Texas, with 
19,525 pieces lumber for stock. 



76 



THE CANAL RECORD 



Vol. VII, No. 8. 



Veal- 



Beef- 



Pork 



COMMISSARY DEPARTMENT. 

The commissary stores are open during the fol- 
lowinc; hours: 

Cristobal. 8 a. m.. to 12.30 p. m.. and 2 to 7 p. m. 

Balboa. 8 a. m. to 12.30 p. m., and 2.30 to 7 p. m. 

Ancon. 8 a. m. to 1 p. m.. and 3 to 6 p.m. 

All other-, 8 a. m. to 1 p. m.. and 3 to 7 p. m. 

Retail prices of cold storage provisions effective 
October 11. IQH: 

FRESH MEATS. PtxCC. 

Mutton — Stewing, per pound 6 

Shoulder, neck trimmed off (4 pounds 

and over), per pound 9 

Entire, forenuarter (not trimmed, 10 

pounds and over), per pound 8 

Legs (8 to 10 pounds), per pound. ... 17 

Cutlets, per pound 18 

Short cut chops, per pound 20 

Lamb — Stewing, per pound ■ 6 

Entire forequarter, neck trimmed on. 

per pound 9 

Legs (5 to 8 pounds) , per pound 20 

Chops, per pound 24 

Cutlets, per pound 24 

-Stewing, per pound 10 

Shoulder, for roasting (not under 4 

pounds) , per pound 12i 

Chops, shoulder, per pound 17 

Chops, per pound 26 

Loin, for roasting per pound 26 

Cutlets, per pound 30 

-Suet, per pound 2 

Soup, per pound 5 

Stew, per pound 8 

Plate, per pound 9 

Corned. No. 1. per pound 14 

Corned, No. 2. per pound 12 

Chuck roast, 3 lbs., and over, per pound . 12 
Rib roast, second cut (not under i\ 

pounds), per pound 16 

Rib roast, first cut (not under 3 pounds), 

per pound 18 

Pot roast, per pound 19 

Rump roast, per pound 19 

Porterhouse roast, per pound 20 

Steak, Chuck, per pound 12i 

Round, per pound 13 

Rib. per pound 18 

Sirloin, per pound 19 

Rump, per pound 19 

Porterhouse (not less than IJ 

pounds), per pound 20 

Tenderloin (Western), per pound. 30 

—Loin chops or roast, per pound 17 

Hams, fresh, per pound S.20 

Shoulders, fresh, per pound i;17 

Spare ribs, per pound 15 

Backbones, per pound 15 

Pigs' feet, each 7 

Pigs" head, J-head 60 

Sausage, home made, per pound 20 

MISCELLANEOUS. 

Livers — Beef, per pound 11 

Calf, each 60 

Half, each 30 

Steak. Hamburger, package ,. 13 

Sausage — Bologna, per pound 13 

Frankfurter, per pound 13 

Liebervvurst, per pound 13 

Devonshire Farm, per pound 20 

Sweetbread, beef, per pound 34 

Eggs, fresh, per dozen t36 

per i-dozen tl8 

Bluefish, per pound 12 

Halibut, fresh, per pound 15 

Salmon, per pound 15 

Roe shad, each 75 

Shad roes, pair 40 

POULTRY AND GAME. 

Chickens — Fancy roasting, milk fcd.large.each . . 

Fancy roasting, mild fed. med., each. . 

Fancy roasting, corn fed, about 5 J 
pounds, each 

Fancy roasting, com fed, about 4 J 

pounds, each 

Fowls, each tt60. 70, 80, 90, and 

Ducks. Western (about 4^ pounds), each 

Capons, each 

Broilers, milk fed, each 

Broilers, corn fed. each 

Turkeys, per pound 

Squabs, each 

Rabbits, skinned, each 

Pariridges. pair 

Grouse, per pair 

Pheasants 

CURED AND PICKLED MEATS. 

Ham — Genuine Westphalia, per pound 

Ham — Sugar cured, per pound 

Sliced, per pound 

Half, for boiling, per pound 

Boiled, per pound 

Hocks, per pound 

Beef, silt, family, per pound 

Bacon — Breakfast, whole piece, per pound 

Sliced, per pound 

Ham. lunch, per pound 

Pork, s.ilt. family, per pound 

Ox tongues, each 

PiRs" feel, per pound 

ToHKues. p>-r pound 

DAIRY PRODUCTS. 

Butter — Creamery, special, per pound 

Shetfield Farms, eoctra fancy, per lb 



Price^ 
Cheese — Philadelphia cream, cake 10 



MOVEMENT OF OCEAN VESSELS. 



1.40 
1.10 

1.25 

1.00 

1.00 

1.25 

2.00 

70 

60 

28 

50 

30 

1.30 

1.30 

1.30 



40 
20 
12 
21 
28 
t8 
12 
?5 
26 
32 
14 
1.00 
*7 
18 

t36 
46 



-Roquefort, per pound. 
Young America, per pound. 
Swiss, per pound. 



35 
22 
28 

Edam, each 1.00 

Edam, tin 25 

Parmesan, per pound 35 

Gouda, per pound 30 

Snappy, per cake 10 

Milk (certified), per quart **.20 

Fer-mil-lac, bottle **.20 

Ice cream, quart, 125 

^gallon J50 

VEGETABLES AND FRUITS. 

Beets, per pound 

Celery, per head 

Cabbage, per pound 

Cucumbers, per pound 

Carrots, per pound 

Egg plant, per pound 

Lettuce, per pound 

Onions, per pound 

Potatoes, white, per pound 

sweet, per pound 

Parsley, bunch 

Peppers, green, per pound 

Romaine, per pound 

Squash, per pound 

Turnips, per pound 

Tomatoes, per pound 

Yarns, pel pound 

Canteloupes. each 

Grapes, Malaga and Tokay, per pound *12 

Niagara and Dela^vare, per pound. . 

Grape fruit, each 

Lemons, per dozen 

l.imes, per hundred 

Pears, per pound 

Oranges, Jamaican, per dozen 



3 
6 
31 
4 

*3 

4 
14 

3 

3 

2 

5 

4 
14 

3 
*3 

5 

3 

7 



♦Indicates reduction from last list. 

♦♦Indicates 5 cents allowed for return of hottle. 

tindicates advance on last list. 

ttFowls weigh each, about as follows: 3, Z\. A. A\, 
and 5 pounds. Prices are based accordingly; when 
size ordered is not in stock, next lightest weight is 
sup::*lied and refund note sent for difference. 

tSold only from commissaries; no orders taken for 
delivery. 

§Not less than half of a fresh ham or shoulder will be 

sold. 

^ 

Stages of the Chagres River and Gatun Lake. 

Maximum height of the Chagres River lor the week 
ending midnight. Saturday, October II, 1913. All 
heights are in feet above mean sealevel. 





Stations. 


Day and Date. 


Vigia. 


CO 

< 


CO 

2, 

B 

<3 


"3 


5i 


Sun., Oct. 5 

Mon.. Oct. 6 

Tues.,Oct. 7 

Wed., Oct. 8.... 
Thurs.. Oct. 9. .. 

Fri.,Oct. 10 

Sat., Oct. U.... 


127.9 
127.5 
127.6 
127.4 
127.4 
126.5 
130.8 


94.0 
93.8 
93.6 
93.6 
93.5 
93.0 
95.8 


67,0 
67.2 
67.3 
67.5 
67.6 
67.9 
68. 1 


67.0 
67.1 
67.3 
67.4 
67.6 
67.7 
68.1 


67.0 
67.2 
67.4 
07.5 
67.6 
67.8 
65.1 


Height of low wa- 
ter to nearest foot 


125.0 


91.0 


44.0 







♦Sluice gates in spillway at Gatun were closed on 
June 27. 1913, with surface of lake at elevation 48.25, 

^ 

Rainfall, Oct. 1 to Oct. 11, 1913, Inclusive. 



Stations. 



Pacific Section — 

Ancon 

Balboa 

♦Miraflores . . . 

Pedro Miguel . 

Rio Grande . , . 
Central Section — 

Culebra 

♦Camacho 

Empire 

Gamboa 

•JuanMina. . . 

Alhajuela 

*E1 Vigia 

♦Frijoles . . . . 

♦Monte Lirio . 
Atlantic Section- 

Gatun 

♦Brazos Brook 

Colon 

^ Porto Bello . . 



c 




E >■ 




Is 


aj 


CO o 




s 


a 


Ins. 




.88 


5 


1.32 


2 


1.37 


11 


l.SS 


11 


1.11 


3 


.90 


5 


1.20 


3 


.95 


S 


.74 


S 


.80 


9 


1.38 


9 


1.85 


9 


2.01 


11 


1 .90 


11 


1.47 


5 


2.26 


5 


2.97 


5 


1.18 


5 



Ins. 
2.53 
4.95 
5.25 
6 04 
3.12 

2.78 
3.96 
3.05 
3.43 
.^.17 
2.48 
4.04 
3.39 
4.24 

3. 58 
6 31 
8 80 
3.70 



♦Standard rain gage — readings at 5 p.m., daily. 
Automatic rain gage at unstarret? stations — values 
midnight to midnight. fTo 5 p. m.. October 10. 



A letter addressed to Mr. and Mrs. F. D. Rice can 
be procured by the addressees on application to the 
general agent of the Royal Mail Steam Packet Com- 
pany, Colon. R. P. 



The following is a list of sailings of the Panama 
Railroad Steamship Line; of the Royal Mail Steam 
Packet Company; of the Hamburg-American Line, 
and of the United Fruit Company's Line. 

NEW YORK TO CRISTOBAL.* 

Advance P. R. R.. Saturday Oct. 4 

Panama P. R. R. Friday Oct. 10 

AUianca P. R. R. Thursday Oct. 16 

Colon P. R. R.. Wednesday.. Oct. 22 

Advance P. R. R. .Tuesday Oct. 28 

Panama P. R. R. .Monday Nov. 3 

Allianca .-P. R. R.. Monday Nov. 10 

Colon P. R. R.. Monday Nov. 17 

Advance P. R. R. . Saturday .... Nov. 22 

Panama P. R. R.. Saturday Nov. 29 

Allianca P. R. R. . Friday Dec. S 

CRISTOBAL TO NEW YORK.* 

Advance P. R. R.. Thursday Oct. 16 

Panama P. R. R. .Wednesday . .Oct. 22 

Allianca P. R.R.. Tuesday Oct. 28 

Colon P. R. R.. Tuesday Nov. 4 

Advance ".P.R.R. Sunday Nov. 9 

Panama P. R. R., Sunday Nov. 16 

Allianca P. R. R.. Saturday Nov. 22 

Colon P. R. R., Saturday Nov. 29 

Advance P. R. R.. Friday Dec. 5 

NEW YORK TO COLON. 

Metapan U. F. C. . Wednesday . . Oct. 8 

Prinz August Wilhelm.H.-.A. . . .Saturday. . . .Oct. 11 

Tivives U. F. C. . Saturday Oct. 11 

Danube R. M. . .Saturday Oct. 11 

Zacapa U. F. C. .Wednesday . .Oct. 15 

Emil L. Boas H.-.A Saturday Oct. 18 

Tenadores U. F. C. . Saturday Oct. 18 

Almirante U. F. C. Wednesday. .Oct. 22 

Tagus R. M.... Saturday Oct. 25 

Carrillo U. F. C. Saturday Oct. 25 

Prinz Joachim H.-A Saturday. . ..Oct. 25 

Santa Marta U. F. C. . Wednesday . . Oct. 29 

Pastores U. F. C. Saturday Nov. 1 

Carl Schurz H.-A Saturday. . . .Nov. 1 

Metapan U. F. C. .Wednesday . .Nov. 5 

Prinz August Wilhelm H.-A Saturday .... Nov. S 

COLON TO NEW YORK. 

Santa Marta U. F. C. Thursday Oct. 16 

Pastores U. F. C. Tuesday Oct. 21 

Carl Schurz H.-A Tuesday Oct. 21 

Metapan U. F. C. Thursday Oct. 23 

Oruba R. M.... Tuesday Oct. 28 

Tivives U. F. C. Tuesday Oct. 28 

Prinz .August Wilhelm. H.-A Tuesday Oct. 28 

Zacapa U. F. C. Thursday Oct. 30 

Emil L. Boas H.-A. . . .Tuesday Nov. 4 

Tenadores U. F. C. - Tuesday Nov. 4 

Almirante U. F. C Thursday. . . .Nov. 6 

Trent R. M.. . .Tuesday Nov. 11 

Carrillo '. U. F. C. Tuesday Nov. 11 

NEW ORLEANS TO COI ON. 

Abangarez U. F. C. . Saturday Oct. 1 1 

Parismina U. F. C. Wednesday. .Oct. 15 

Sixaola U. F. C. Saturday Oct. 18 

Cartago U. F. C. Wednesday. .Oct. 22 

Turrialba U. F. C. Saturday Oct. 25 

COLON TO NEW ORLEANS. 

Turrialba U. F. C. Thursday. . . .Oct. 16 

Heredia U. F. C. Saturday Oct. 18 

Abangarez U. F C. Thursday Oct. 23 

Parismina U. F. C. Saturday Oct. 25 

*Amended schedule, resulting from temporary with- 
drawal of the Allianca for repairs. 

Panama Railroad Companjc's steamers sail from Pier 
It, Cristobal, at 3 p. m. 

Royal Mail steamers leave for New York on alter- 
nate Tuesdays at 1 p. m.; for Southampton on alter- 
nate Tuesdays at 10 a. m. 

United Fruit Company's ships for New Orleans 
direct, leave on Thursdays and Saturdays at 3 p. in.; 
ships for New York via Kingston, on Tuesdays at 1.30 
p. m. and Thursdays at 1.30 p. m.; for B-^cas del Toro 
on Mondays at 5 p. m.; for Limon. via Bocas del 
Toro. on Tuesdays at 5 p. m.; and for Limon direct, 
Tuesdays at 3 p. m. 

Hamburg-American steamers sail for New York, via 
Kingston and .Santiago de Cuba, on Tuesdays: the 
Prinz Joachim ^nri Prinz .August Wilhctin at 10 a. m., 
and che Emil L. finas and Carl Schurz at 2 n- m. 

The Panamanian Steamship Company's Panama will 
sail from Panama for Aguadulce and Pedregal on 
October 16 and 26. 

• 

.Salting of the "Tivives." 
Office of LTnited FRtar Company. 
Colon. R. P., October 13, 1913. 

Ta Alt Concerned — This is to advise that the steam 
ship Tivives. scheduled to sail from Colon to New York, 
via Kingston, on October 28, will sail on October 27, 
at 1.30 p. m. H. R. Wilford, 

General Agent. 



CANAL 




RECORD 



Volume VII. 



ANCON, CANAL ZONE, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 22, 1913. 



No. 9. 



The Canal Record 

Published weekly under the authority and supervision of 
the Isthmian Canal Commission. 



The Canal Record is published free of charge, one copy 
each to all employes oj the Commission and Panama 
Railroad Company whose names are on the sold mil. 
Extra copies and back ninnbers can be obtained from the 
news stands of the Panama Railroad Company for Jive 
cents each. 



Address all Communications, 

THE CANAL RECORD, 

Ancon, Canal Zone, 

Isthmus of Panama. 

No communication, either for publication or requesting 
information, will receive attention unless signed with the 
full name and address of the writer. 

NOTES OF PROGRESS. 



More Dredging Equipment Passed Tiirough Ga- 
tun Locks. 

Another division of the Atlantic dredging 
fleet was passed through the locks at Gatun 
from the sea channel to the surface of Gatun 
Lake on Wednesday, October 22. It consisted 
of the dipper dredges Chagres and Mindi, and 
three mud scows, in tow of the tug Empire; 
French ladder dredge No. 1, and four other 
mud scows in tow of the tug Gatun; and 
a coal hoist, fuel oil lighter, and loaded coal 
barge, in tow of the tug DeLesseps. The fleet 
began to enter the lower lock at about 9.27 
a. m., and passed out into the lake at 1.30 
p. m. All of the floating equipment passed 
through in this lockage will be held in the lake 
for use in dredging operations in Culebra Cut. 
This leaves only the seagoing suction dredge 
Caribbean, and the two pipeline suction 
dredges Sandpiper and No. S3, for work in 
the Atlantic entrance. 



Submarine Cables for Lighthouse Transmission 
Line Across Culebra Cut. 

Provision for electrical connection with 
the west side of the Canal has been made by 
the Lighthouse Subdivision, through ducts 
laid below the bottom of Culebra Cut near 
its north end, opposite Tower R on the 
main line of the Panama railroad. Four 
rectangular ducts of vitreous material, each 
four inches in interior diameter, have been 
laid with their bases at elevation 34.9 
feet above sealevel, and all four encased 
together in an armor of concrete eight 
inches thick on all sides. The top of the 
armor is at elevation approximately 36 feet, 
or four feet below the bottom of the Canal 
channel. Where the duct line crosses the 
former drainage channel it was supported on 
a steel truss formed from a piece of scrap, 
which was once a part of an old French un- 
loading crane at Balboa. The drainage chan- 
nel was filled with rock to the level of the 
bottom of the Canal for 25 feet in either 



direction, to protect the duct line from 
dredges operating in the Cut. The duct line 
is 520 feet in length, and at both ends, outside 
the Canal prism, are vertical shafts, built of 
reinforced concrete, reaching to elevation 95 
feet, containing manholes, two feet by three 
feet six inches in plan, to allow access to the 
ends of the horizontal ducts. The manshafts 
are surmounted by 4-inch concrete slab 
covers, with ring bolts. 

Through one of the four ducts has been 
drawn a cable, one inch and a half in diameter, 
for the use of the Lighthouse Subdivision 
in insuring continuous illumination of the 32 
beacons to be installed along the 95-foot 
berm of Culebra Cut. Another duct is devoted 
to a cable containing 50 pairs of telephone 
and telegraph wires for the Panama railroad, 
while the two remaining ducts provide for 
future requirements. 

The two ends of the cable wire will be 
connected with aerial transmission lines of 
2,200 volts terminating at Pedro Miguel 
Locks, from which point all the fi.xed aids to 
navigation in Culebra Cut, and in the Pacif- 
ic section, will be controlled. 



PASSING CUCARACHA SLIDE. 



Rafting Logs to Gamboa. 

The Chilibre Land and Timber Company 
has entered into an arrangement with the 
Panama Railroad Company, whereby the 
former has been quoted a rate per hundred 
pounds on logs from Gamboa to New York. 
The timber company control a large tract 
of land on the Chilibre River, a small tributary 
of the Chagres which joins the main river near 
the village of Juan Mina. From this tract 
the company is engaged in cutting mahogany, 
cocobolo, and other hardwoods, hauling the 
logs to the Chilibre, and from there floating 
them down stream to Gamboa. A small 
house will be erected near the gravel pit, 
where the loading is done, for the accommoda- 
tion of the company's employes during the 
period of loading on cars. 



Tablet in Memory of John T. Morgan. 

The Southern Commercial Congress has 
made formal application to the Secretary of 
War for permission to place at some prom- 
inent place in the Canal Zone a bronze tablet, 
about four by six feet in size, carrying a 
medallion life size bust of Senator John T. 
Morgan of Alabama, who died in 1907. 
It is also desired to have a legend inscribed 
on the tablet setting forth his relation to the 
Canal project. A number of delegates to the 
Congress are planning a cruise in Central 
American waters, and expect to arrive at 
Colon on November 4, on which date it is 
desired to dedicate the tablet. If the idea re- 
ceive* the approval of the Secretary of War, 
the tablet may be placed near Tower R, at 
Gamboa, at the nortiiern entrance to Culebra 
Cut. 



Efforts to Fill South End of Cut and Bring 
Dredges to Clear Channel. 

The task of opening a way through Cuca- 
racha slide to allow the filling of the two 
miles of the Cut between it and Pedro 
Miguel Lock, and thus make possible the 
bringing of dredges from the Pacific entrance 
to clean a navigable channel, has been car- 
ried on as rush work since the blowing up of 
the Gamboa dike. 

On Wednesday morning, October 22, there 
were about 13 feet of water in the Cut south 
of the slide. A depth of 28 feet will be re- 
quired for the passage of dredge No. 85, on 
account of the lifting barge being designed 
for elevation 68 feet, or plus 68 feet, in con- 
nection with the operation of removing the 
girder span in Bridge 575, at Paraiso. 

Following the failure of a ton and one-half 
of dynamite, exploded in the afternoon of 
October 10, and of successive smaller blasts 
at the upper end of the trench, which had been 
dug across the slide for the passage of Gatun 
Lake water, to enlarge the opening satis- 
factorily, blasting was temporarily abandoned, 
and efforts were made to increase the flow 
through the trench by means of shovels. 
This was augmented, beginning in the after- 
noon of October 11, by sluicing with hose. 
Two pipeline connections from tanks, and 
two from pumps installed on the lake side of 
the slide, were made by October 7, for the 
use of four lines of hose. Since the evening of 
October 14, the work has been carried on 
continuously by three shifts of men, work- 
ing eight hours each in rotation. 

The material has yielded slowly to sluicing. 
Beginning in the afternoon of October IS, 
further blasting was begun at the lower end 
of the trench, and advanced upward along 
the stream. Relatively light "dobie" charges 
were used at first, to loosen the bottom of 
the trench and assist the sluicing. Later, 
'drill holes were sunk at advantageous points 
and heavy blasts exploded in the attempt to 
remove large masses of material. The heavi- 
est of these, exploded at 11.45 p. m., on 
October 17, was of such violence that houses 
along the Canal, from Pedro Miguel to 
Empire, rocked on their foundations as in 
an earthquake, and articles were thrown 
from shelves. 

The use of dynamite was scarcely more sat- 
isfactory than in the previous efforts. The na- 
ture of the material is such that it merely 
slumps back into place, or more of it is pushed 
forward by the slide to fill the hole made by an 
explosion. On the morning of October 19, it 
was decided to abandon blasting and remove 
the sluicing arrangements, and to bring a 
pipeline suction dredge from Gamboa to 
pump water over the barrier, in augmenting 
the flow. Accordingly, dredge No. 86 was 
towed in during the morning of October 20. 
In the meantime, a freshet in the Chagres was 



78 



THE CANAL RECORD 



Vol. VII, No. 9. 



causing a sharp rise of GatunLake; during the 
48 hours ending at 7 a. m., October 21, the 
lake had risen 1.04 feet, or to elevation 70.74- 
above scalevel. This so increased the head of 
water at the slide that the flow during the 
morning of October 20 was estimated to be at 
the rate of 7,000,000 cubic feet per day. In the 
24 hours following, the surface of water in the 
south end of the Cut rose two feet, registering 
an elevation of 49.87 feet above sealevel at 8 
a. m., October 21. Moored about 300 feet 
north of the slide the dredge began pumping 
at 12.45 p. m., on October 21, using about 350 
feet of 20-inch discharge pipe. Under the con- 
ditions at the slide, it has a pumping capacity 
of about 1,750,000 cubic feet in 24 hours. 

The rate of rise of water in Culebra Cut, 
north and south of Cucaracha slide, is shown 
by the following records, taken at 8 a. m. of 
each date: 



Friday. Oct. 10 

Satnrriav. Oct. U 

Sundiy, Oct. 12 

Monday. Oct. 13 

Tuesday. Oct. 14 

Wcdn sday, Oct. 15 

Thursday. Oct. 16 

Frida\ , Oct. 17 

Saturday, Oct. 18 

Sunday, Oot. 19 

Mondciy. Oct. 20 

Tuesday, Oct. 21 

Wednesday, Oct. 22 



North side*, -South sidef 



67.64 


41.62 


6V.76 


41.75 


68.23 


42.02 


6.S 55 


42.31 


68.7. 


42.85 


e-i.se 


43.10 


69.14 


44.03 


69.30 


45.22 


69.50 


46.00 


69.61 


46.18 


70.11 


47.55 


70.66 


49.87 


70.83 


52.81 



*Readins£ of Gamboa gage same as Gatun Lake. 
tGageat north end Pedm Miguel Locks. 

♦ 

The east end of the dike at Gamboa was 
dynamited on Saturday, October 18. 

^ 

Ancon Crusher, 
Following is a statement of rock crushed 
at Ancon quarry for the three weeks ending 
October 18: 



DATE. 


Hours 

work! d 


Cubic 
yards. 




7 30 
3-50 

8 iiO 
6 35 
7.20 
S.5i) 


7,221 




1,154 


October 1 


1.729 




2.002 




2,242 


October 4 


1,225 






Total 


39.05 


10.573 




6.40 
7.05 
6.50 
6.40 
6.50 
6.40 


1,661 


October 7 


1,5S8 


October 8 


1,730 




1,458 




1,6S6 




2.100 






Total 


40.45 


10.223 




3.20 
5.30 
7.35 
8.35 
7. 45 
6.40 


1.231 




1,480 




1,259. 




1,756 




1.995 


October 18 


1,679 






Totals 


39.25 


9,410 



Central Division Vnloaders. 
During the month of September, 1913, 
the following trains and cars were unloaded 
by the Central Division: 



Location. 


No. of 
unloaders. 


No. of 
trains. 


No. of 
cars. 


Balboa .... 


4 

2* 


549 
182 


10.671 




3.458 






Total 


5 


731 


14.129 






•One unloader workc 


d three day 


s. 





tral Division forces, and 150,400 cubic yards 
were removed by sluicing at Gold Hill, the 
latter work being in charge of the Fifth Divi- 
sion of the Chief Engineer's Office. Of the 
amount removed by the Central Division, 
144,490 cubic yards were classified as earth 
and 224,910 cubic yards as rock. 

Of the total, 297,800 cubic yards were 
primary excavation for the Canal, and 71,600 
cubic yards were classified as "Plant excava- 
tion." Three hundred and sixty-nine thou- 
sand four hundred cubic yards were removed 
by steamshovels. 

♦ ' — 

Concrete Work in Locks and Spillways. 

Concrete work in the Canal locks is nearly 
completed, the aggregate amount in place 
at the close of work on October 18, being 
4,480,876 cubic yards. 

A statement ot the concrete laid in the 
three sets of locks for the Canal, and in 
Gatun and Miraflores spillways, as of 
October 18, follows: 

GATUN LOCK!s. 

The last concrete for the locks proper, as distinguished 
from that necessary to finishing work by the Firs: 
Division, was muted and placed on Ajgust 16. 1913. 
At th; close cf work on thit day the total amount cf 
concrete placed by the Atlantic Division amounted to 
2,045.485 cubic y.irds. 

GATUN SPILLWAY.* 

Occ. 13 34 

Oct. 14 t2 

Oct. 15 56 

Oct. 16 54 

Oct. 17 II 

Oct. 18 f^ 

Xotal 210 

Previouiily reported -^' -O^^ 

Grand_total 237.318 

♦Includes hydro Jectric station. 

PEDRO MIGUEL LOCK. 

Concrete laid. 
Cubic yards- 

Oct. 13 19 

Oct. 14 5 

Oct. 15 \\ 

Oct. 16 J* 

Oct. 17 '* 

Oct. 18 ^ 

Total • ma •)?? 

Previously reported y_-t.zzo 

Grand total 924.316 

MIRAFLORES LOCKS. 

Oct. 13 3 

Oct. 14 1 

Oa. 15 -^ 

Oct. 16 

O.t. 17 •■ 

Oct. 18 ° 

Total J^ 

Previously reported 1.511 .uoj 

Grand total 1.511,075 

MIRAFLORES SPILLWAY. 

Concrete work at the Miraflores spillway was com- 
pleted on October 8. At the close of work on that day, 
the ;,mnunt of concrete placed aggregated 76.346 cu- 
bic yards. 

.♦ 

Missing Man. 

Any one having information regarding the 
whereabouts of Mr. Clarence Mynders, who 
is supposed to be on the Isthmus of Panama, 
is requested to communicate with the office 
of the Chairman and Chief Engineer, Culebra. 



tion, the engine pumping for 40 minutes. The 
fire, which is supposed to have been caused by 
the overturning of a kerosene lamp, or stove, 
was completely extinguished at 9.53 p. m. 
The construction cost of the buildings is es- 
timated at about 823,000. Three West In- 
dians, who volunteered their services, were 
slightly injured during the progress of the fire. 



Steamsliovel Records in September. 

During the month of September, the total 
amount of material excavated in the Central 
Division was 519,800 cubic yards, of which 
369,400 cubip yards were excavated by Cen- 



Removal of Colon Light. 

The lighthouse on Manzanillo Point, known 
as Colon Light, will be removed. It is the 
property of the Panama railroad, which has 
maintained a light in the tower, and has 
made a fixed charge against all ships entering 
the harbors of Colon and Cristobal for the 
cost of its maintenance. It has also been 
used by the railroad company as a signal 
station to notify ships at which dock they 
are to berth, or to be notified as to a ship's 
intention to lie at anchor in the harbor, when 
the ship enters without a pilot. The lens 
in the tower is of the fourth order revolving 
type, and is in fairly good condition. The 
iron framework is still serviceable, and may 
be utilized on Bona Island, or San Jose Rock, 
at the Pacific approach to the Canal. While 
the light is no longer required, it will be 
necessary for the railroad to have a signal 
tower, and it is proposed to erect one on the 
roof of the Hotel Washington, where the 
signals may be given with flags. The Forti- 
fications Division will have charge of re- 
moving the light, and the material will be 
turned over to the Lighthouse Subdivision. 



Fire at New Gatun. 
Fire on Tuesday, October 14, entirely des- 
troyed two frame buildings at New Gatun, 
the property of Mr. Ricardo Arias of Panama. 
One of the houses, tax No. 222, contained 72 
rooms, and the other, tax No. 225, twelve 
rooms. The fire broke out at about 6.23 
p. m., in the larger of the two buildings, and 
quickly spread to the one adjoining. The Ga- 
tun company was assisted by the automobile 
fire engine, and a crew from the Cristobal sta- 



Accidentai Drownings. 

George L. Martin, a private in the United 
States Marine Corps at Camp Elliott, was 
accidentally drowned in the Caribali resen'oir, 
near Gorgona, on Friday, October 17. He 
was 22 years of age, was unmarried, and had 
been on the Isthmus 10 months. His former 
home was at Philadelphia. A brother, Robert 
Martin, lives at No. 1224 South Nineteenth 
street in that city. 

GuiUermo Castro, metal check No. 19SI0, 
and Felipe Rojo, metal check No. 19614, Span- 
ish laborers employed in the work of sluicing 
at Cucaracha slide, were drowned in the la- 
goon between the two sections of the trench 
across the slide, at about 10.40 a. m., October 
16. Castro fell into deep water and Rojo at- 
tempted his rescue. Lawrence B. Stcclman, 
an American powder foreman, sprang into 
the lagoon to assist them. He was unable to 
bring them out, and narrowly escaped drown- 
ing- ^ 

Suicide. 
Miss F. Barrera, a passenger on the Pacific 
Mail Steamship Company's City of Para 
committed suicide at Balboa on the night 
of Wednesday, October 17, by jumping from 
the vessel into the water. The body floated 
to the surface and was discovered by the 
Balboa police the same night. Miss Barrera 
was between 35 and 40 years of age, and was 
on her way from Paris to her home in Salva- 
dor. She was a cripple and it is supposed 
that her deformity led to the commission of 
the act. The body was given burial in Ancon 

cemetery. 

♦ 

The semiweekly informal dance of the 
Strangers Club will be held on Thursday, 
October 23. The Guatemalan orchestra 
will furnish the music. 



October 22, 1913. 



THE CANAL RECORD 



79 



SOCIAL LIFE OF THE ZONE. 



Cristobal Woman's Club. 

The Cristobal Woman's Club held a recep- 
tion at the Commission clubhouse on Wed- 
nesday afternoon, October tS, when thercwere 
present about 20 members of the club and a 
number of invited guests. This was tl^e first 
general meeting of the club for the year, and 
the president, Mrs. Thomas Edwin Brown, 
Jr. delivered an address of welcome in which 
she gave an outline of the program as ar- 
ranged by the committee. 

The following musical program was carried 
out: Contralto solo, Mrs. Diers; soprano solo, 
Mrs. Mears; piano solo, Mrs. Farmer; so- 
prano solo, Mrs. Williamson; vocal duet, Mrs. 
Mears and Mrs. Diers. Accompanists, Mrs. 
Ullrich and Miss Leyland. 

On the first meeting in each month there 
will be a formal program, with a speaker or 
lecturer invited to speak on some special sub- 
ject. The second meeting in each month will 
be more informal. The topic suggested by 
the paper read at the general meeting will be 
employed, with one of the members of the 
club as leader, and the short paper read will 
be followed by a general discussion. 

With the e.xception of the tw'o meetings in 
November, the names of the speakers cannot 
be given at this time. The calendar for the 
year is, as follows: 

NOVEMBER. 

Wednesday. November 5 — Subject, The newspaper 
of today; its place and influence in moulding^public 
opinion. Speaker. Mr. Ricliard Lee Metcalfe. 

Wednesday, November 19 — Subject, What news- 
papers and periodicals are responsible for. Leader, Mrs. 
Frederick Mears. General discussion. 

DECEMBER. 

Wednesday, December 3 — Subject, higher educa- 
tion for women. 

Wednesday, December 17 — Discussion of public 
schools. 

JANUARY. 

Wednesday, January 7 — Subject, eugenics. 
Wednesday. January 21 — Subject, the social prob- 
1 em and related topics. 

FEBRUARY. 

Wednesday, February 4 — Subject, the trend of 
modern literature. 

Wednesday. February 18 — Subject, book reviews. 

MARCH. 

Wednesday, March 4 — Subject, the Government 
of the United States. 

Wednesday, March IS — Subject, suffrage and politi- 
cal parties. 

APRIL. 

Wednesday, April 1 — Subject, sanitary conditions 
in South Africa. 

Wednesday, April 15 — Annual meeting. 



Church Notes. 

The annual harvest thanksgiving festival 
was celebrated in Christ Church, Colon Beach, 
on Sunday, October 12. The chancel was 
decorated with fruits, vegetables, and other 
products, the gifts of members of the parish. 
These articles were afterward sold in the 
schoolroom, the oroceeds being devoted to the 
expenses of the church. Following the even- 
ing service at 7.30 o'clock, the second in the 
series of monthly organ recitals was given, the 
program consisting of compositions of Haydn. 
On Sunday, November 9, a Beethoven even- 
ing will be given. 

The new Baptist church building in Cris- 
tobal was opened on Simday morning, Oc- 
tober 19, when the services were conducted 
by the superintendent of the mission, the 
Rev. J. L. Wise. Special preachers for the 
afternoon were the Rev. E. C. Notman, 
for 50 years missionary in Bocas del Toro, 
and Mr. Merwin Canton, a worker among the 



Indians in Peru, In the evening, the Rev. 
S. Moss Loveridge of Culebra preached. The 
new building has been erected to take the 
place of the concrete building, destroyed by 
fire on March 23, 1911, which was formerly 
situated across the boundary line in Colon. \ 
At the quarterly convention of the Isthmian 
Sunday School Association, held on October 
18, eighty-seven persons were present. Ten 
Sunday schools were represented by tlieir 
superintendents, as follows: East Balboa, 
Mrs. William Tomey; Panama, Mrs. Re- 
becca Compton; Corozal, Mr. W. E. Lyno; 
Pedro Miguel, Mr. W. H. Faulkner; Para- 
iso, Mr. Thomas Kent; Culebra, Mr. J. 
F. Warner; Empire, Mr. W. H. Hoffman; 
Las Cascadas, Mrs. H. Jackson; Gatun, the 
Rev. C. O. Purdy; Cristobal, Mr. W. H. 
Kromer. The convention voted to arrange 
for the circulation of the library among the 
families living at the stations on the Panama 
railroad. This will be done through the Sun- 
day schools in the towns of G^tun, Cristo- 
bal, and Bas Obispo. 



Annual Meeting of University Club. 
At the annual meeting of the members of 
the University Club, held in the evening of 
October 18, the following officers were elected 
for the ensuing year: President, Edward 
Schildhauer; vice-president, Robert K. Vib- 
ert; secretary, Paul S. Wilson; treasurer, 

A. Richardson; members of the board of 
governors, the aforementioned, ex officio, and 
Lieut. Geo. R. Goethals, Messrs. Joshua Piza, 
Samuel Lewis, James Forsythe, and Dr. A. 

B. Herrick. 



Sale of Flowers at Mount Hops Cemetery. 

It has been decided to discontinue the giv- 
ing away of flowers at the Mount Hope ceme- 
tery, and to make sales hereafter at the fol- 
lowing rates: Roses, 60 cents U. S. currency, 
per dozen; other flowers in bouquets at a price 
of 25 cents U. S. currency, and upward, ac- 
cording to the size of the bouquet, scarcity of 
flowers, season, etc. 



Education of a Blind Boy. 

A meeting of the committee on the Elysius 
James Education was held at the Hotel Tivoli 
recently. The committee is composed of wo- 
men who were members of the executive board 
of the Canal Zone Federation of Women's 
Clubs at the time of the disbanding of this or- 
ganization on April 19, 1912. There are seven 
members, and five were present at the meeting. 
The object of this meeting was to consider 
ways and means of raising money to complete 
the payment of the second year's schooling 
for the blind boy, Elysius James, who entered 
the Perkins Institute for the Blind in Boston, 
Mass., in September, 1912, as the ward of the 
Federation. The reports of his work and 
progress for this year were promising beyond 
the expectations, not only of the women who 
sent him, but of the teachers who instructed 
him. At the meeting of the Federation in 
January, 1913, a popular subscription for the 
second year's schooling was taken, the amount 
raised being a little over §100. This money 
was paid for the first school terrri when the 
boy entered the institute in September, 1913. 
The committee feels that the full year should 
be given him if it is possible to raise the $200 
that remain to be paid. At the close of this 
year he will be brought back to the Isthmus, 
where efforts will be made to place him in 



the way of earning his living by suitable 
work, such as caning chairs, which he has 
learned to do. The committee has under- 
taken various means of raising the remainder 
of the fund, and, with the generous response 
thus far accorded, it is thought that the 
money is assured. Mrs. Thomas E. Brown,' 
Jr., of Cristobal is the chairman of the com- 
mittee, and Mrs. J. E. Westberg of Empire is 
the treasurer. 



PERSOMAL. 



Lieur.-Col. Charles F. Mason, accompanied 
by his family, returned from his annual leave 
of absence on the Cnstobal, which docked on 
Saturday, October 1 ' 

Lieut. -Col. E. E\ cth Winslow, Corps of 
Engineers, Maj. Will: ira Chambcrlaineof the 
Department of Artillery and Land Defense, 
and Maj. George Blakely of the Coast Artil- 
lery Corps, are spending a few days on the 
Isthmus. 

Maj. F.C. Boggs, General Purchasing Agent 
of the Isthmian Canal Commission, and chief 
of the Washington office, was a passenger on 
the Cristobal, arriving October 18. 

Mr. H. O. Cole, accompanied by his family, 
sailed for New York on Thursday, October 
16, on the Santa Maria, on his annual leave 
of absence. 

Mr. James C. Courts, clerk of the House 
Committee on Appropriations, accompanied 
by his son, arrived on the Isthmus on the 
Cristobal, on Saturday, October 18. 
i Mr. Forrest M. Towl, president of the 
Southern Pipe Line Company, arrived on the 
Isthmus on the Paslores on Tuesday, Oc- 
tober 14. He has been engaged by the Canal 
Commission to make a study of oil pipe and 
pumping plant designs in connection with the 
permanent fuel oil pipe lines and pumping 
plants to be established at the Canal termini. 

Mr. Frank P. Wagg, resigned as superin- 
tendent of schools, effective at the close of 
work, Saturday, October 18, and sailed for 
the United States on the Panama on Wednes- 
day, October 22. He has been connected with 
the Canal Zone school system for the last 
four years. Mr. Albert R. Lang, has been 
appointed to fill the vacancy. 



Banquet by First Uitlsjon Employes. 

A banquet was given at the Hotel Tivoli on 
Tuesday evening, October 2 1 , by the employes 
of the First Division. Mr. C. P. Fortney 
acted as toastmaster, and remarks were made 
by Col. H. F. Hodges, Mr. W. R. Halloway 
and Mr. J. Donahue. 



"Wandering Herd.*' 

There will be a meeting of the "Wandering 
Herd" at the Hotel Washington on Sunday, 
October 26, at 1..^0 p. m. It is urgently re- 
quested that all members attend as business of 
vital importance will be acted upon, a.nd a 
report on the financial condition of the or- 
ganization will be made by the secretary- 
treasurer. 

John H. Keefe, 

President. 

Ancon, C. Z., October 20, 1913. 

Obituary. 
Mrs. Bernsee, wife of F. L. Bernsee, a 
former American employe, died at her quar- 
ters in the Garfield House, Colon, onSaturday, 
October 11. She was 43 years of age, and 
had been on the Isthmus two years. Her 
former home was at Louisville, Ky, 



80 



THE CANAL RECORD 



Vel. ril, iTe. 9. 



CANAL WORK IN SEPTEMBER. 



Monthly Report of the Chairman and Chief 
Engineer to the Secretary of War. 

CULEBRA, C. Z., October 15, 1913. 
The Honorable the Secretary of War, 
Washington, D. C. 

Sir: I have the honor to submit the fol- 
lowing report of operations on the Isthmus 
for the month of September, 1913: 
Department of Construction and Engineering. 

The following table summarizes the princi- 
pal items of work accomplished by the con- 
struction divisions during the month: 



guard valve machines is 88 per cent complete, 
and the electrical installation of these ma- 
chines is 19 per cent complete. 

Miter gate moving machines — ^Ninety-two 
per cent of the mechanical, and 35 per cent of 
the electrical installation is complete. 

Miter gate forcing machines — The mechani- 
cal erection is 40 per cent, and the electrical 
installation, 38 per cent complete. 

Track — Approximately 89 per cent of all 
Ltack is complete with concrete; 33 per cent 
of single, and 66 percent of double crossovers, 
have been placed. 

Spillway gate machines — The mechanical 



Item. 


Unit. 


Atlantic. 


Central. 


2d Div. 


5th Div. 


6th Div. 


Total. 


Worlc excavation, dry. 
Woric excavation, wet. 


Cubic yds. . . 
Cubic yds. . . 


1,091 


297,800 
♦150.400 


69,432 
t214,917 


35,881 




404,204 


1.060,647 


1,425.964 


Total worlc excavation 


Cubic yds. . . 
Cubic yds. . . 


1,091 


448,200 


284,349 


35,881 


1,060,647 


1,830.168 


Plant excavation, dry. 




71,600 


15,756 


S.189 




92.545 


Total Canal excava- 
tion 


Cubic yds. . . 
Cubic yds.. . 

Cubic yds.. . 

Tons (Gross) 

Feet 

Miles 

Miles 


1.091 


519,800 


300,105 


41.070 


1.060.647 


1.922.713 


Material placed in dams 


24,531 






23,690 




48,221 


Concrete placed, loclcs, 
dams, and spillways. 

Explosives used 


2,615 

19.04 
9,080 

0,63 

1.40 






3,095 

6.89 
6.702 




5,710 


56.88 
137,218 
27.69 




28.00 
15,510 


110.81 




168.510 


Traclcs removed 

New track laid 


3.09 
4.80 


31.41 


1.10 
35.209 
2.062 




7.30 






35,209 




■Barrels 


2.785 




8,197 


25 


13,069 


New roads built 

Water mains laid 






Feet 

Feet 


2.305 










2.305 












Open drains and ditches 








6,550 
3.401 
9.01 






6.550 






2,851 
9.92 


5.200 
9.95 


3,378 
8.32 


2.839 
9.45 


17,669 


Average rainfall . . . ^ . . 


Inches 


9.66 



♦Removed by Fifth Division for Central Division. 
tRemoved by Si.\th Division for the Second Division. 
First Division— OfBce of the Chief Engineer. 

LOCK GATE AND PROTECTIVE DEVICES. 

The status of the work in the several locks 
may be summarized, as follows: 

Gatun — Work was in progress on all the 
leaves, 40 in number: Erection, 99.9 per 
cent complete; reaming, 99.9 per cent com- 
plete; riveting, 99.9 per cent complete; 
finishing, 90.9 per cent complete. 

Pedro Miguel — Work was in progress on the 
entire 24 leaves: Erection, 99.5 per cent 
complete; reaming, 99.9 per cent complete; 
riveting, 99.5 per cent complete; finishing, 
90 per cent complete. 

Mirafiores — Work was in progress on all of 
the 28 leaves: Erection, 99 per cent complete; 
reaming, 99 per cent complete; riveting, 
97.3 per cent complete; finishing, 76 per cent 
complete. 

ERECTION. 

On October 1st, 99.45 per cent of the total 
tonnage of lock gate material in all locks had 
been erected. There were still to be erected 
26 tons at Gatun, 45 tons at Pedro Miguel, 
and 166 tons at Mirafiores. 

INSPECTION AND ERECTION OF OPERATING MA- 
CHINERY ANT) ELECTRICAL EQUIPMENT. 

Valve machines — The present status of the 
mechanical erection is, as follows: Rising 
stem valve machines, 96 per cent complete; 
cylindrical valve machines, 100 per cent com- 
plete; auxiliary culvert valve machines, 100 
per cent complete. The electrical installation 
of the above machines is 56 per cent complete 
for the rising stem valve, 56 per cent com- 
plete for the cylindrical valve, and 68 per cent 
complete for the auxiliary culvert valve ma- 
chines. The mechanical erection of the 18 



erection is entirely completed and the electri- 
cal installation is 15 per cent complete. 

Pumps — Mechanical erection is 75 per cent 
complete on miter gate sump pumps, 11 per 
cent complete on chain fender sump pumps, 
100 per cent complete on drainage sump 
pumps, and 66 per cent complete on culvert 
pumps. Electrical installation is 36 per cent 
complete on miter gate sump pumps, and 57 
per cent complete on drainage sump pumps. 

Transformer room equipment — The installa- 
tion of this equipment is 85 per cent complete 
at Gatun, 62 per cent complete at Pedro 
Miguel, and 52 per cent complete at Mira- 
fiores. For all the locks, this work is approxi- 
mately 66 per cent complete. 

Hydroelectric station — All foundations have 
been built. The three turbines and their 
penstocks, and also the headgates, are set 
complete. 

CaWe— Out of a total of 2,429,296 feet of 
cable on order, 802,250 linear feet have been 
pulled into the ducts. 

Control houses — Seventy per cent of the 
steel beams for control house floors have been 
placed in concrete. The roof trusses of the 
control house at Gatun are placed and riveted. 

Illumination — Reflectors for exterior and 
interior lighting are being manufactured from 
material on the Isthmus. At Gatun, the 
erection of the lamp posts, with cross-arms, 
is 99 per cent complete. At Pedro Miguel, 
30 poles and 20 single cross-arms are set. 
At Mirafiores, 30 posts are set. 

Control apparatus — Practically all control 
apparatus for the locks and spillways is on 
the Isthmus. 

Transmission line — Sur\-eys were made 
from Mile 7 to Mile 18, inclusive, for the 



location of track-span bridges, and stakes 
were set for the alignment of concrete forms 
between Miles 40 and 44^. Eighty-six foun- 
dations for track-span bridges were placed to 
carry the transmission line, making a total 
of 247 foundations set to the close of the 
month. Eleven track-span bridges have 
been placed on permanent foundations. 

TESTING THE LOCKS. 

Gatun — At 11.20 a. m., on September 26, 
water was admitted to the upper end of the 
upper lock from the west culvert, through the 
upper rising stem valves, and the water 
brought up to lake level. As a preliminary 
test of the valves and culverts of the west 
wall, the upper rising stem valves were then 
closed and the water passed down the flight 
of three locks. Water was then locked down, 
step by step, from the lake to the lower lock, 
which was also being filled by the two 14-inch 
sea valves in the lower guard gates. At 
4.45 p. m., the lock had filled to sealevel and 
the lower gates were opened for the tug 
Gatun. The lower operating gates were closed 
behind the tug and she was lifted, step by 
step, to the lake. In order to save time on 
the ascent, the short length of lock was used, 
and the upward passage was made in approxi- 
mately one hour and fifty-one minutes. All 
operating devices were operated from local 
control, that is, each machine ^vas operated 
from the panel in the same room with the 
machine. This made it necessary to move 
from machine to machine for the various 
operations, whereas, when the plant is com- 
pleted, the entire fiight will be controlled from 
a central tower. On its return from the lake, 
the tug was locked through to sealevel in one 
hour and thirty-two minutes, all operating 
valves and gates in the west chamber being 
used. 

Pedro Miguel — Five transformer rooms, 
necessary for the operation of the east lock 
chamber, and emergency dams, were put in 
service, including high and low tension feeders. 
All rising stem valve machines in the east 
culvert were tested and adjusted, including 
electrical work for local control. Four rising 
stem valves, the upper four on the center and 
west walls, were put in service, as well as all 
rising stem valves in the center wall, except 
Nos. 334 and 335, which were not tested on 
account of mud in the culvert below. All 
miter gate moving machines in the east cham- 
ber were tested and adjusted without struts. 
All cylindrical and auxiliary culvert valves 
have been finally tested and are ready for 
service. 

Mirafiores — All cables necessary for opera- 
ting the west lock chamber have been tested 
for continuity of circuit, and all oil switches 
have been inspected and adjusted. 

EMERGENCY DAMS. 

Gatun, east dam — This dam has been com- 
pleted, tested, and accepted. 

Gatun, west dam — This dam has been com- 
pleted, tested, and accepted. 

Pedro Miguel, west dam — Final tests were 
made during the month with satisfactory 
results. The time for the complete operation 
was practically the same as for the two dams 
at Gatun. With the exception of painting, 
this dam is ready for acceptance. 

Pedro Miguel, east dam — Pouring of concrete 
for the operator's house was finished, and 
the work of placing windows and doors was 
started. All concrete work for rack and 



October 22. 1913. 



THE CANAL RECORD 



81 



track quadrant was completed, and painting 
of the dam continued. 

Miraflores, Zfesl dam — During the month, 
a total of 204 tons of structural material was 
assembled and bolted in place. Riveting is 
about three per cent complete. 

Miraflores, east dam — During the month, a 
total of 204 tons of structural material was 
assembled and bolted in place. Riveting is 
about 28 per cent complete. 

AIDS TO NAVIGATION. 

During the month, work was in progress 
constructing an electric transmission line 
across the Cut at Gamboa and pulling cable 
through the same; installing an electric 
pole line from the main line of the Panama 
railroad to beacon Xo. 3, Atlantic section; 
completing the erection of range towers Nos. 
9 and 10, erecting range tower \o. 13, and de- 
livering material to the site of tower No. 14, 
all in Gatun Lake section; driving pile cluster 
for the foundation of beacon No. 1, Atlantic 
section, and constructing slab foundations for 
beacons Nos. 2 and 3, Atlantic section; cast- 
ing lamp bracket arms, beacon tops, and gas 
buoy sinkers at the pile casting platform at 
Gatun; constructing a permanent water stage 
register at Gatun, one at the north end 'of 
the east wing wall, and one at the south end of 
the'east wing wall at Pedro Miguel; moving 
beacons, roofs, and sinkers from the old 
Balboa plant; and making the necessary 
surveys and reconnoissances, and clearing 
land in connection with the construction of 
range towers, targets, beacons, electric pole 
lines, etc. Forty-nine beacon platforms were 
manufactured at Empire shops and delivered 
at Gatun. 
Second Division — OfBce of the Cliief Engineer. 
B.^LBOA TERMINALS. 

The design of power distribution and in- 
terior illumination systems for the shops, 
and of the illumination for the administration 
building, was advanced; and other studies 
and designs for the shops were made. Work 
of erecting structural steel in various shod 
buildings, laying cement tile roofing, and 
erecting core ovens in the foundry, was carried 
on. Requisitions were submitted for tools 
and equipment, and some minor awards were 
made. 

At the drydocks, entrance basin, and coal- 
ing plant, 85, ISS cubic \ardsof earth and rock 
were excavated. Filling at the terminus 
amounted to 98,713 cubic yards. Five 
thousand nine hundred and eighty cubic 
yards of concrete, with 1,120,618 pounds of 
reinforcing steel, were placed in the construc- 
tion of shops and quay walls. Thirteen 
thousand eight hundred and furty-ninehnear 
feet of pile, 10,670 feet wood, and 3,179 feet 
pipe, were driven. 

On the quay walls and pier, 362 linear feet 
of superstructure were completed, 2,630 
linear feet of caisson manufactured, 28 piers 
sunk to rock, and 2,822 linear feet of caisson 
sunk. 

METEOROLOGY AND IIM3R0GRAPHY. 

The rainfall for the -month was deficient 
at all stations, except Ancon, Balboa, Empire, 
Monte Lirio, Gatun, and Brazos Brook. The 
monthly totals ran-ed from 6.75 inches at 
Camacho to 14.12 inches at Monte Lirio. 
The maximum precipitation recorded in one 
day was 3.26 inches, at Monte Lirio on the 
5th. Approximately normal conditions of tem- 
perature, relative humidity, and atmospheric 
pressure prevailed during the month, while 



the cloudiness and wind movement were 
generally above normal. The average esti- 
mated rainfall over the Chagres Riverbasin 
was about 10 per cent below normal: 10.57 
inches, against a 13-year normal of 11.82 
inches. 

HYDROLOGY. 

The total yield of the Gatun Lake water- 
shed for the month was about eight per cent 
below normal, and that for Alhajuela, about 
three per cent below. There was one rise 
of moment, on the 9th during which the 
elevation at Vigia reached 136.2, a rise of 
10 feet. This is the largest freshet since 
May 22, 1913. The maximum discharge at 
Alhajuela was 20,000 second-feet. The rise at 
Gamboa was about seven per cent of the Vigia 
rise, being one-tenth of the percentage holding 
(70 per cent) before Gatun Lake was formed. 
The lake rose from 60.42 to 66.00, or 5.58 
feet, representing a storage of 18.90 billion 
cubic feet. 

SURVEYS. 

A circuit of precise levels was run around 
the territory' of the Pacific terminus; a care- 
ful survey was made for the proper location of 
the coal dock at the Atlantic entrance; the 
location of gravel banks in the Chagres River 
between Alhajuela and Gamboa was made 
upon a map, 34 banks being located; sun-eys 
were made for oil tank location at both termini ; 
sur\-eys of large areas for the Joint Land 
Commission were completed, and other mis- 
cellaneous surveying work was done. 

INSPECTOR OF SHOPS. 

Pedro Miguel engine house was abolished 
on September 15, and the temporar>' hostling 
of engines at Cocoli was started that night. 
The hostling of engines at Gold Hill was 
commenced on September 9. Steel castings 
were poured for the first time in the Balboa 
foundrj' on September 5. The generation of 
of oxygen and acetylene gas was commenced 
on September 6. The preparation of equip- 
ment for storage was started at Las Cascadas 
on September 29. 

GENERAL. 

The routine work of the office engineer, and 
the traveling engineer was carried on; and 
the landscape architect continued work on 
plans for Balboa and Pedro Miguel. 

Fifth Division — Office of the Chief Engineer. 

DISTRICT NO. 1 — LOCKS, DAMS, AND DRY EX- 

C.WATION. 

Excavation — The total excavation amounted 
to 41,070 cubic yards, the entire amount 
being classified as earth. 

Fining and embankmenl — Dry filling in the 
prism of the west dam at Pedro ^liguel was 
not increased, the total amount of material in 
place remaining at 699.518 cubic yards. The 
backfill at Pedro Miguel was increased by 340 
cubic yards, the total quancity in place at the 
close of the month being 1,024,253 cubic yards. 
At Miraflores, dry filling in the west dam was 
increased by 23,690 cubic yards, making the 
total quantities of dry and hydraulic filling 
in place at the close of the month 1,708,639 
cubic yards, and 661,048 cubic yards, re- 
spectively. The backfill at Miraflores was 
increased by 9,511 cubic yards, the total 
quantity in place on August 31 being 1,910,- 
270 cubic yards. 

Pedro Miguel Lock — On the morning of 
September 17, the drainage from Culebra 
Cut was diverted to the east wall lock culvert, 
and the opening through which the drainage 



water had entered the middle wall culvert 
since August, 1911, was closed, forms placed, 
and the opening filled with concrete. The 
middle wall culvert was cleared of debris. 
Drainage pumps, temporary dams, tracks, 
and materials were removed preparatory to 
the filling of Miraflores Lake. The wooden 
fender on the end of the south guide wall was 
completed. The steel roof of the lock con- 
trol house was assembled and the riveting 
about 50 percent completed. A 20-inch pump 
was installed to keep the west lock chamber 
dry until the gates are completed. 

OPER.\TION OF THE AUXILL\RY CONCRETE CONSTRUCTION 
PLANT AT PEDRO MIGUEL. 

One i-cubic yard mixer worked four days 
(30 hours, actual working time), and mixed 
and placed 1 70 cubic yards of concrete. There 
were 508 cubic yards mixed by hand, or a total 
of 678 cubic yards. 

Miraflores Locks — Excavation of the dikes 
and high ground in the forebay of the locks 
was completed, the spoil being used for back- 
filling and grading around the locks. One 
steamshovel, located in a borrow pit on the 
north side of Cocoli Hill, supplied material for 
completing the junction of the west dam 
^\ ith the locks. Concrete work on the control 
house was continued. Obsolete material was 
removed and there was a general cleaning 
up around the locks. One 20-inch pump was 
installed in the lower east chamber to take 
care of drainage while work continues on the 
lock gates and the installation of machinery. 

OPERATION OF THE AUXILIARY CONCRETE CONSTRUCTION 
PIJVNT .\T MIRAFLORES. 

One j-cubic yard mixer worked four days 
(204 hours, actual working time), and mixed 
and placed 200 cubic yards of concrete. Con- 
crete mixed by hand amounted to 1,144 cubic 
yards, or a total of 1,344 cubic yards. 

DISTRICT NO. 4 ANCON QUARRY. 

PERFORMANCE OF ROCK CRUSHER PLANT. 



Length of working day (hours) 

Average number of hours per day, actual 

working time 

Average number of cubic yards cnjshed per 

hour perworkingddy 

Average number of cubic yards crushed per 

working hour 

Total output for the month (cubic yards) . . . 



8.00 

7.00 

156.48 

196.41 
3.1,209.00 



DISTRICT NO. 5 — GOLD HILL SLUICING PLANT. 

Excavation during the month totaled 
150,400 cubic yards. The south cut was ex- 
tended approximately 103 feet into the active 
slide. The north flume was raised and ex- 
cavation continued near the face of the Cut. 
Near the north flume, a hydraulic elevator 
was installed, which elevated material to a 
height of 26 feet and discharged it into the 
flume. A 4-inch nozzle was used in the ele- 
vator, and a 4-inch monitor was employed 
for cutting and sluicing to the elevator. 
Foundations were completed for the boostef 
pumps which are to be used in connection 
with sluicing the high ground east and to the 
rear of Cucaracha slide, and one of the pump- 
ing units was received. Th3 pile foundations 
were driven for the additional 7,500-gallon 
pumping unit at the central station. 

Slith Division— Office cf the Chief Enjineer. 
PACIFIC END. 

Seven dredges were engaged in channel and 
inner harbor excavation at Balboa, removing 
321,246 cubic yanis of earth and 260,712 cubic 
yards of rock from the Canal prism, and 178,- 
579 cubic yards of earth from the inner harbor 
and terminal basin site, a total of 760,537 
cubic yards. At the close of the month, there 
remained to be removed from the Canal 



82 



THE CANAL RECORD 



Vol. VII, No. 9. 



prism, not including fill, 2,291,535 cubic yards. 
The French ladder dredge Gopher, engaged in 
sand excavation at Punta Chame during the 
entire month, removed 18,650 cubic yards. 

ATLANTIC END. 

Eight dredges were in operation during the 

month, removing 450,517 cubic yards of 

earth and 28,172 cubic yards of rock from the 

Canal prism. On October 1, there remained 

to be exacvated 710,896 cubic yards. On the 

same date, 40 feet of water could be carried 

from zero to zero plus 2,100 feet, and 35 feet 

to the locks at Gatun. In addition to prism 

excavation, 116,385 cubic yards of coral sand 

from Margarita Bay, 4,573 cubic yards of 

coral and 31,765 cubic yards of coral sand 

from the coal station, and 21,946 cubic yards 

of rock from the north side of pier No. 17, 

were taken out. 

Division of Municipal Engineering — Office of the 
Chief Engineer. 

NORTHERN DISTRICT. 

The construction of the new Colon water- 
works was continued and all concrete work, 
other than pavement and gutter and certain 
finishing work, was completed. The pump 
station was completed, with the exception of 
the floor within the building arid the installa- 
tion of the low service pumps. All work on 
the sedimentation basin was completed, ex- 
cept for certain miscellaneous service piping. 
The main filter building was completed up to 
and including the eaves, and made ready for 
the setting of the roof trusses. The main 
entrance, including the stairways, was 75 
per cent completed at the close of the month. 
The 20-inch pipe line from Brazos Brook to 
the aeration basin was also completed. Prep- 
aration of the special sand for the filter bed 
was continued, and approximately 350 cubic 
yards were screened, washed, and separated. 
All work on the new Colon improvements was 
completed. 

SOUTHERN DISTRICT. 

Construction of the storm sewers for the 
new American townsite at Balboa was con- 
tinued and 571 linear feet were completed. 
Construction work on the new townsite known 
as La Boca was continued, approximately 
7,000 cubic yards being excavated and about 
5,200 cubic yards being backfilled. At the 
end of the month, all work in this townsite 
was approximately 40 per cent completed. 

NEW PANAMA WATERWORKS. 

Work was continued at the site of the 
Mirallores pump station, at the purification 
plant, and at the high service reservoir at 
Ancon. At the Miraflores pump station, con- 
crete work on the intake house was practically 
completed, four piers were built to support 
the concrete walk between intake house and 
pump station, and the concrete walk was com- 
pleted. Excavation for the main pump sump 
was completed; also, all concrete work in dis- 
tribution culvert and walls of main sump. 
Floors were started in the auxiliary sumps. 
The 30-inch pipe line was extended nine feet 
into the distribution culvert, and the 4-inch 
section extending into the gatehouse was in- 
stalled. At the Miraflores filtration plant, 
steamshovcls were engaged throughout the 
month on the site proper, 12,640 cubic yards 
of rock being excavated. Fill was continued 
on the north end of the plant. At the Ancon 
high service reservoir, work was completed on 
the sand and rock bins, track was laid up the 
incline and a car put in operation, and work 
was continued excavating the site for the 



foundations, and 5,964 cubic "yards of ma- 
terial were removed, most of it solid rock. Work 
was commenced on the construction of the 
300,000-galIon wash water tank for the Mira- 
flores purification plant, 250 cubic yards of 
eartli and rock being removed. 
Atlantic Division. 
GATUN LOCKS. 

Construction of the new Gatun saddle dam 
was continued, 2,441 cubic yards of earth 
being taken out of the banks and placed 
therein. The backfill placed during Septem- 
ber amounted to 30,391 cubic yards; at the 
close of the month, the backfill was 98.4 per 
cent completed. 

Receiving and issuing material — No cement 
was received at the locks cement shed; the 
small balance on hand at the beginning of the 
month was issued and the shed cleaned out. 
Six hundred and ninety cubic yards of sand 
were received from Balboa, and 1,219 cubic 
yards were issued from the storage pile. The 
small amount of rock on hand at the beginning 
of the month was issued. 

GATUN DAM. 

Construction during the month increased 
the total fill by 24,531 cubic yards, car 
measurement, making the total amount in 
in place 21,986,893 cubic yards. On October 
1, the dam was 99.98 per cent completed. 
Additions to the dry fill amounted to 24,531 
cubic yards, and this material was placed 
on the north and south toes of the dam. This 
makes the total dry fill in place 11,768,481 
cubic yards. 

GATUN SPILLWAY. 

The backfill was extended by 52 cubic 
yards, making the total 16,769 cubic yards. 
Concrete laid during the month amounted to 
2,124 cubic yards, making the total quantity 
in place 229,873 cubic yards. Concrete work 
was 99.87 per cent complete at the close of 
the month. 

Hydroelectric plant — The work of con- 
structing the hydroelectric building was taken 
over by the Quartermaster's Department on 
September 8. During the month, plain con- 
crete placed amounted to 492 cubic yards, 
making a total of 7,167 cubic yards. 

WEST BREAKWATER — COLON. 

Out of a total of 23,467 cubic yards of 
Porto Bello rock placed on the breakwater 
during September, 6,677 cubic yards were 
unloaded by cranes, and 16,790 cubic yards 
by derrick barges. The total amount of rock 
placed upon the breakwater to October 1 was 
320,160 cubic yards. 

Central Dlvialon. 

The total amount of material excavated 
during the month was 369,400 cubic yards, 
of which 144,490 cubic yards were classified 
as earth and 224,910 cubic yards as rock. 
The entire amount was removed by steam- 
shovels, 297,800 cubic yards being classi- 
fied as primary excavation and 71,600 cubic 
yards as "Plant" excavation. Of thetotai pri- 
mary excavation, 45,000 cubic yards were 
taken from within the lines of the Canal prism 
and 242,800 cubic yards from without the 
prism, the latter amount being excavated 
from slides and from high levels as a pre- 
ventive measure against slides. 

The daily average number of steamshovcls 
at work was 14.62 and the total number of 
shovel days was 365j. 

The estimated amount of material removed 
and to be removed, according to the revision 
of July 1, 1913, is 115,696,455 cubic yards. 



Up to October 1, 1913, 109,229,155 cubic 
yards had been removed, leaving 6,467,300 
cubic yards to be removed, in order to com- 
plete all excavation in the Central Division. 
At the close of the month, 94.41 per cent of 
all excavation was completed. 

Dry excavation in Culebra Cut was com- 
pleted on September 10, and all rolling stock, 
equipment, tracks, and miscellaneous material 
were removed from the Canal prism. 

Material dumped from the Naos Island 
trestle during the month totaled 31,671 cubic 
yards. 

The daily average number of laborers at 
work was 4,788, while the average number 
of gold men working was 412. 

Quartermaster's Department. 
LABOR. 

The force report of September 24 showed 
a decrease of approximately 3,000 men, as 
compared with the number working on 
August 27. The United Fruit Company has 
established a recruiting agency on the Isthmus, 
and in two weeks 327 laborers were sent by 
that company to its plantations in Costa 
Rica and Honduras; over 90 per cent of these 
laborers were British West Indians. 

BUILDINGS. 

Building work was confined chiefly to the 
commissary, clubhouse, and police station 
at Pedro Miguel. All of these buildings were 
well under way at the close of the month and 
will be completed within 60 days. 

QUARTERS 

The demand for gold and silver quarters at 
Ancon and Balboa continues; at other points 
there is no congestion. Instructions have 
been given to discontinue assignments of 
married quarters in the Las Cascadas-Bas 
Obispo district, and the department will with- 
draw its organization from that district as 
soon as all quarters are vacated. 

MATERIAL AND SUPPLIES. 

The value of material received was $643,- 
155.38. This material came forward in 32 
steamers, having a total weight of cargo, ex- 
clusive of lumber, piling, and ties, of 11,850 

tons. 

Subsistence Department. 

The Hotel Tivcli was operated at a loss 

of §152.36. The operation of the line hotels, 

laborers' messes, and restaurants resulted in 

a net profit of §1,718.93. The total net profit 

on subsistence operations during the month 

was $1,566.57. 

Department of Civil Administration. 

COURTS. 

During the month, one civil case was dis- 
posed of in the Supreme Court, 51 civil and 
45 criminal cases in the circuit courts, and 
51 civil and 398 criminal cases in the district 
courts. 

POSTS, CUSTOMS, AND REVENUES. 

Money order sales amounted toS406,515.28, 
and the fees to $1,868.45. Receipts from 
stamp and card sales and newspaper postage 
aggregated $6,177.22. The total collection 
of revenues was $19,110.50, and the collec- 
tions on account of court fines, costs, and fees 
$2,272.05. A total of $164,794 was deposited 
in postal savings accounts, and a total of $187,- 
585 was withdrawn. At the port of Ancon, 
22 vessels entered and 19 cleared; at the port 
of Cristobal, 18 entered and 20 cleared. 

POLICE AND PRISONS. 

The total number of persons arrested waa 
399, of whom 357 were m^n and 42 women 



October 22, 1913. 



THE CANAL RECORD 



83 



Nine convicts were committed to the peni- 
tentiao' and 12 were discharged, leaving 140 
convicts in confinement at the close of the 
month. The cost of guarding and subsisting 
these prisoners was $2,592.64, and the value 
of the work performed bv them on the roads 
of the Canal Zone was 32^340.90. 

FIRE PROTECTIO^. 

Two fires were reported in the Canal Zone 
and these occasioned no loss of property. 
Department of Sanitation. 

The total number of deaths from all causes 
among employes was 44, di\ided, as follows; 
From disease 36, and from violence eight, 
giving an annual a\'erage per thousand of 
7.30 and 1.62. respectively. The annual 
death rate per thousand among employes dur- 
ing the month of September, 1912, was 9.19. 

The annual average death rate per thou- 
sand in the Canal Zone, and in the cities 
of Panama and Colon, including both em- 
ployes and noneniployes, was 27.39. This 
rate is based upon a population in the Canal 
Zone of 62,810, according to the census of 
February, 1912, and populations in Panama 
and Colon, respectively, of 47, 172 and 20,232. 
as estimated by the Department of Sani- 
tation. The annual average death rate per 
thousand among the same classes of popu- 
lation for the month of September. 1912, 
was 22.42. 

Segregating the whites from the blacks, the 
annual average death rate per thousand from 
disease among employes was: Whites, 4.08; 
blacks 8.09, giving a general average for dis- 
ease of 7.30. For the same month during 1911, 
the annual death rate per thousand from dis- 
ease among whites was 5.95; blacks, 12.24, 
giving a general average of 10.63; and for the 
same month in 1912: Whites, 4.92; blacks, 
6.81, giving a general average of 6.36. 

Among employes, deaths from the princi- 
pal diseases were: Dysentery, one; hemoglo- 
binuric fever, one; organic disease of the heart, 
two; pneumonia, seven; tuberculosis, four, 
leaving 21 deaths frcm all other diesases, and 
eight deaths from external violence. No case 
of yellow fever, smallpox, or plague originated 
on, or was brought to the Isthmus, during the 
month. Geo. W. Goethai.s, 

Chairman and Chief Engineer . 



JOINT LAND COMMISSION. 



Interments in Canal Zone Cemeteties. 

At a meeting of the Board of Health, held 
on September 15, it was decided to abolish 
the charge of issuing burial permits on and 
after September 20. A charge of §2, however, 
will be made for gravedigging and interment 
in connection with each burial made in Canal 
Zone cemeteries. This charge dees not ap- 
ply to employes of the Canal Commission 
and the Panama railroad, or their families, 
or to emploj-es of contractors engaged on 
Commission or railroad work. 



Balboa Sand Sctvice. 

A report of sand shipped from Balboa d uring 
the month of September, follows: 



Dt^TlNATION. 


Numbei ■ 
cars. 


Cubic 

yards. 




431 




29 667 






First Division 


8 

47 

66 

3 

44 

4 

5 


128 

753 




1 600 


Quartermaster's Department 

Municipal Engineering 


75 
884 
100 


MiS'"elIaneous 


125 






Total 


1,020 


19.206 



Rules of Dismissal. 

{Continued from last week,) 

1 n the matter of sundry claims, in the lands of Malachin, 
docket No. 618-A, etc. — In the case of the following 
named persons, the evidence before the Commission is 
that their houses and other improvements have been 
purchased by the United States and that payments 
therefor have been made in the year of 1913. 

The record of these claims, showing the name and 
docket number of each, together with the tax numbers 
of houses included in such claims and the record of the 
Disbursing Officer showing the register number of 
each account, its amount, and the month of the year of 
1913 in which the same was paid is, as follows; 



Name. 


Doc. 


Mo. 


Reg. 


Am'l. 




No. 


paid. 


No. 




AUeyne (Allyne) William. . 


626 


Aug. 


28036 


$40 


House Xo. 52. 
















28465 


110 


House Xos. 67 and 90. 










Armien, Felixia (Felicia).. . 


625 


Aug. 


28460 


80 


House No. 1.746 












844 


Aug. 


28463 


40 


House No. 611. 








Ati, Philip (Felipe) 




Sept. 


28797 


60 


House Nos. 98 and 99. 










Bertram (Burtram) Joseph 


480 


Sept. 


28802 


250 


House Nos. 162. 163. 










Brown, Charles 


55' 


Aug. 


28682 


60 


House No. 360. 














Aug. 


28461 


35 


House No. 77. 










Constantine. Camillo (Car- 


738 


Aug. 


28680 




meal) 








30 


House No. 421. 










Edmond. Joseph (Joseph... 




Sept. 


28826 




Edmond) 








20 


House No. 166. 








Farqueson (Farquharson), , . . . - 


Sept. 


28808 


30 


Daniel 










House No. 1.732. 












157 




28153 


65 


House No. 1,746 














Sept. 


28815 


15 


House No 362. 














Aug. 


28674 


10 


F"arm only. 














Aug. 


28678 


110 


House No. 1,737 














Sept. 


288 IS 


10 


Farm only. 








Hudson. Maria (Mariah),.. 


1, 4.S 


Sept. 


28819 




House Ko. 1,708. 








35 


James (Jones). Samuel 




Sept. 


28822 


40 


House No. 174. 










Lindsay. A. H 




Aug. 


28614 


15 


Farm only. 










Lx>nd . Fred 




Sept. 


28829 


20 


House No. 1.330. 










Lynch. Juliet 


793 


Aug. 


28610 


150 


House No. 640. 










McLean (McLane). James. 




lulv 


27878 


100 


House No. 1.863. 










Miza. Marie (Marv) Louise 




Sept. 


28834 


90 


H. Nos. 1.702. 1,703 










Montlev. Jesse, estate of.. . 




Aug. 


28151 


200 


House No. 61)0. 










Moridon. Thomas, admin- 










istrator of estate of Pino 














Sept. 


28836 


25 


House No. 1 .550. 












* 


Sept. 


28838 


15 


House No. not given. 










Palmer. John H 


481 


Sept. 


28839 


175 


House No. 164. 










Ratigan. Nehemiah 


897 


Aug. 


2868S 


60 


House No. 459. 










Stone. James 




Sept. 


28848 


5 


Farm only. 










Thompson. Adelina (Adlin) 




Sept. 


28851 


100 


House No. 1,422. 










Williams. Florence 




Sept. 


28854 


120 


House No. 93. 











In view of the payments noted, the foregoing claims 
call for no further action by this Commission and they 
are accordingly dissmissed. 

(Signed) Federico Boyd. Roland P. Falkner. 
Samuel Lewis. L. S. Rowe, Commissioners. 

September 16. 1913. 

In the matter of sundry claims, in the lands of Malachin, 
docket No. 61S-A, etc. — With respect to the occupiers, 
on the lands of Matachin hereinafter named, the 
evidence before the Commission is that they have 
signed contracts with the Isthmian Canal Commission 
for the sale of the houses designated by their tax num- 
bers, together with all their other improvements situ- 
ated on the said lands. The names of such persons, 
the docket numbers of their claims, and the tax num- 
bers of their houses, follow: 

Docket Tax 

Name. No. No. 

Chambers. Richard 489 148 & 151 

Austin, George H 1,246 

C^hong. Fen 132 

Hoffman, Dorcas 571 

Iglesia. Inocencio 380 



I >oi kri Tax 

Name No No. 

Jones, Drusella- 1 .347 537 

McGrath, Ber>-1 4M.* 152 

Morris. Robert.. 23i I 721 & 1,729 

Morrison, Thomas .S.S9- 358 

Pedregales. P 342 1 .554 

Scott. Harriet 566 

\'assal, George 1 .709 

Vidal (Vieal). Michael 1.212 

In view of the agreements herein referred to. these 
claims call for no further action by the Commission 
and they are accordingly dismissed. 

(Signet!) Federico Boyd. Rolanu P. Falkner, 
Samuel Lewis, L. S. Rowe. Commisswners. 

September 22. 1913- 

In the matter of certain claims for houses m the town 
of Corgona. docket No. 1,250-A. c(c.-— The evidence 
submitted to the Commission with resi'cct to certain 
claims filed for buildingsinthetownof Gurgona showed 
that the houses referred to were constructed upon lots 
leased from the Isthmian Canal Commission after 
such a lease had been entered into. 

In a decision rendered April 16. 1913, in the case 
of Agusta Dunlop. the Commission said: 

"We have therefore reached the conclusion that 

it is not within the province of the Joint Land 

Commission to take cognizance of claims arising 

out of the revocation of revocable leases or licenses 

issued by the Isthmian Canal Commission. Such 

claims have no organic relation to grants contained 

in the Treaty, nor to the international obligation 

which the United States has agreed to discharge 

under the Treaty, and for the adjudication of all 

such claims, the claimants must seek a remedy 

through the procedure afforded by municipal laws." 

In accordance with the decision rendered in the case 

of Agusta Dunlop. the claims of the following persons, 

for the houses upon the lots hereinafter designated 

by their tax numbers, are dismissed without award: 

Name Tax Docket 

No No. 

Chong, Kong Sing. . 770 1.059 

Cools. Gabriel V 805 1 ,539 

Scipion, Moncoq 861 . ■ • 

Scipion, Moncoq ...,,, 866 ... 

Kenton. Joseph 865 .... 

(Signed) Federico Boyd. Roland P, Falkner. 
Samuel Lewis, L. S. Rowe. Commissioners. 

September 20. 1913. 

In the matter of sundry claims, docket No. 1,240-A. 
(./(;__ — A number of claims have been presented to the 
Commission for properties below the 87-foot level, 
some of which are already submerged or partly sub- 
merged. In preparing for the creation ol Gatun Lake, 
many persons were removed from time to time from 
their holdings, and with many of ihem settlements 
were made. Other settlements have been made within 
this area at a more recent date. 

A careful examination has been made of all cases 
in which a payment has been reported, and where there 
was any uncertainty in regard to the property covered 
by the previous payment the claimant has been given 
the benefit of every reasonable doubt. In the following 
cases the Commission has reached the conclusion that 
the claimant has no property for which an award could 
be sought from this Commission which is not covered 
by the previous payments hereinafter noted: 

Bocane^ro. Rufino. docket No. 1.352. the property in- 
cluded in this claim was covered by the payment in 
April. 1911. by \'oucher 14769 for 1.500 banana plants 
and all his other improvements in the valley of the 
Trinidad River. 

Burnett. J ethero. docket No. 1.377. the property m- 
cluded in this claim was covered by the payment in 
January, 1912, by Voucher 18133 for growing crops 
and other improvements in the valley of the Chagres. 
Clair, James, docket No. 1.456. the property in- 
cluded in this claim was covered by the payment in 
Februarj'. 1912. by Voucher 18696 for house tax No. 
1, and other improvements in or around Bohio. 

Felix. Francisco {Francois), docket No. 1,642, the 
property included in this claim was covered by the pay- 
ment in December, 1911, by V'oucher 17759 for all 
growing crops and fruit trees, one house tax. No. 105, 
and all other improvements in the %'alley of the Chagres 
River in the area to be covered by the waters of Gatun 
Lake. 

Garcia. Alejandro, the property included in this 
claim was covered by the payment in October, 1909, 
by Voucher 8203 for a house at Buenavista, and in 
January-. 1912. by Voucher 18265 for House 153 and 
improvements near Bohio. 

Grant, Virginia, the property included in this claim 
was covered by the payment in Januar>'. 1912. by 
Voucher 18490 for house, tax No. 1,214 and other im- 
provements near Tabernilla. 

Hamilton, Charles, docket No. 1,143. the property 
included in this claim was covered by the payment 
in Januar>-. 1912, by \'oucher 1S267 for house, tax No. 
29, together with improvements near Bohio. 

Henry, Robert, the property included in this claim 
was covered by the payment in Februar>', 1912, by. 



THE CANAL RECORD 



Vol. VII, No. 9 



Voucher 18752 fqc house, tax No. 1,U7 and other im- 
provements at Barbacoaa. 

Herrera. Jos^ PiUt, docket No. I.J6Q. the property 
included in this claim was covered by the payment on 
April 6. 1911. by the Panama Railroad Company to 
said Herrera far the purchase of improvements on land 
owned by the Panama Railroad Company in the valley 
of the Chagres River which was situated below a con- 
tour line of S7-feet above sealevel. 

Jimenez, Jacinto, docket Nos. 136 and iJ7. the prop- 
erty included in'this claim was covered by the paymen: 
in May. I'^li. by Voucher 20192 for property near 
the Valdespino River, located as property No. 32 
on the sketch map of the Gatun Lake area. 

Johnson. Joseph, the property included in this claim 
was covered by the payment in January, 1912. by 
Voucher 18495 for houses, tax Nos. l,217and 1,21S and 
ail other improvements in or near the town of Taber- 

nilla. . , , . ■ 

Leonia. Edward .{Girard), the property mcluded m 
this claim wag covered by the payment in June. 1913. 
by Voucher 25051 for house, tax No. 36 and other 
improvements. 

McLean. John, the property included in this claim 
was covered by the payment in September. 1910, by 
Voucher 12404 for houses, tax No. 134 and fruit trees 
near Bohio. 

de Orta, Andres, docket No. 434. the property in- 
cluded in this claim was covered by the payment in 
February. t9I2. by Voucher IS739 for house, tax No- 
1,432 and other improvements at Buenavista. 

Osborn. John., the property included in this claim 
was covered by -the payment in January, 1912, by 
Voucher 18509'for house, tax Nos. 1,163 and 1.169 and 
other improvements near Tabernilla. 

Q-iinlo. Ezekiel. docket No. 1.160. the property in- 
ckKied in this claim was covered by the payment in 
July. 1911. by Voucher 15929 for house, tax No. 1,431 
and other improvements at Buenavista. 

Rojas. Juan, docket No. 1,491. the property in- 
cluded in this claim was covered by the payment in 
December. 1911". by V^oucher 17752 for house, tax No. 
102 and other imi)rovements in the valley of the Chagres. 

Rowe. Ann, docket No. 1.376. the property included 
in this claim was covered by the payment in January, 

1912, by Vouchor 18134 for houses, fruit trees, growing 
crops and other improvements in the valleys of the 
Chagres and Cario Quebrado Rivers. 

Sa7izuill€n. Tomasa. docket No. J. 374. the property 
included in this claim was covered by the payment on 
April 17. 19 11. by the Pinama Railroad Company, for 
the purchase of improvements on land owned by the 
Panama Railroatl Company, in the valleys of the Trini- 
dad and Chagrtis Rivers, which are situated below a 
contour line of ft?-feet above sealevel. 

Tcijiera or f rejoin. Francis, the property included 
in this claim was covered by the payment in July, 

1913, by Voucher 25509 for house No. 259 and all other 
improvements at Santa Cruz. 

In view of the payments herein noted, no claim 
against the United States can be recognized by the 
Joint Land Commission, and these claims are hereby 
dismissed. 

(Signed) FeDerico Boyd, Roland P. Falkner. 
Samvel Lewis. L. S. Rowe. Commissiontrs. 

September 16. 1913. 



In the matter of sundry claims in the lands of Matachin. 
docket No. 61S~-.A . etc, — With respect to the occupiers 
on the lands of Matachin hereinafter named, the 
evidence before the Commission is that they have 
signed contracts with the Isthmian Canal Commission 
for the sale of the houses herein designated by their 
tax numbers, together with all other improvements 
situated on the said lands. The names of such persons, 
the docket numbers of their claims, and the tax num- 
bers of their houses, follow: 

' Name. ' Docket Tax 

No. No. 

Alexia (Ellxia). Dolores 623 363 

Allen. Richard 1694 

Anderson. Chas. F. (Chas. H.) . . 1257 267 

do 1258 386 

Bougupstry. Marie L. A. (Bo- 

qu'-l te, Maria Louise) 633 1 700 

Bricklift. Nathan 73 

Carr. (Carrol) Alexander 644-1628 580 

Carr. James .... 88 

Cater, James (James A.) 351 

Chambers, Josiah .... 152 

C iphar.Thcophas.CSeeTefascola 646 .... 

Uarshi^auz. Leonce ... 1560 

Desis, (Decues) Samuel 1 , 2. 3, & 4 

D=az. Juan (Juan Diaz Abreo). 40 

Fern^mdez, Manuel (see Car- 

vajal. Placido) .... .... 

Fraile. Emiliano .... 21 

Francis, James +85 168 

Gale. Peter 898 541 

Gillis. \'ictoria (Richard) 78 

Gordon. Walter U Farm only 

Ilall. Francis 66 542 

Henderson, Nathaniel 739 Not given 

Higgins. (Higginson) Josephine 92 



Name. Docket Tax 

No. No . 

Hycient, (Hyacient) Matherine 567 150 

Iglesia, Modesto 1078 422 

Jarrett, Isabel (Isabella) 1698 

Johnson, James U 564 161 

Kayne, James .... 1333 & 547 

Kmight, William 672 340. 341 

&1742 

Lawrence, Joseph 673 473 

Legall. John 539, 540, 555. 

& 1720 

Magannon. Margarita .... Not given 

McFarlane, Samuel .... 12 

McKinney. George .... 1754 

Marriot. Jean Mariette (Mari- 

ette Juan) 972 599 

Martin, Thomas 100 

Moody, Rebecca .... 1561 

Morey, (Murray) Samuel B 689 532 

Moridon, Thomas, adminis- 
trator of estate of Pino Lam- 
bert • 1550 

Nelson, Georgiana .... 54 

Nobriga, John de .... 652 

Pena. Juan .... 1753 

Peters, George 1 162 Farm only 

Ramirez, (Rimera) Rufino ... 1724 

Reid, Martin E 123 

RickeLts, loseph 700 373 

Smith. William 945 153 

Sn^ith, Benjamin 736 357 

Spcnce, Jacob .... 24 

Tefascola (Theo. Fascola) 361 

Torres, Dianas (Dimas) Not given 

Thompson, Richard In 79 536 

Townsend, Hezekiah 714 Farm only 

Valdelamar, Juana .... 377 

Voyer, Luis (Louis) .... 1 10 

Walker, Odina (James Walker) 32 

Walker, \'ictoria (James Walker) .... 172 

Wiggins, Donald Farm only 

Williams. Florence .... 95 

Good Samaritan Lodge. No. 52, 

Royal King George .... . 2036 

In view of the agreements herein referred to, these 
claims call for no further action by the Joint Land 
Commission and they are accordingly dismissed. 

(Signed) Federico Boyd. Roland P. Falkner, 
Samuel Lewis, L. S. Rowe, Commissioners. 
September 16, 1913. 

In the matter of sundry claims, docket No. 1.240'A, 
etc. — With reference to the claims for improvements 
of the persons hereinafter named, the evidence 
before the Commission is that they have signed agree- 
ments for the sale of their houses and other improve- 
ments to the Isthmian Canal Commission. The names 
of such persons, their docket numbers, the tax num- 
bers of the houses included in such agreements and 
their location, follow: 

Docket Tax 
Name. No. No. Locality. 

Anderson, Charles H 1257 267 Santa Cruz 

(Gamboa) 

Moran. Anibal 1095 875 Topkeca 

Moran. Victor ". 881 Topkeca 

Quintas, Emilio 887 Near Dump 4 

Teran, Guillermo 879 Juan Grande 

(Waterloo) 

Thompson, Richard In 79 890 Topkeca 

Wilson, John 1600 . . . Bohio 

In view of the agreements before noted these claims 
call for no further action by this Commission, and 
they are accordingly dismissed. 

(Sii>ned) Federico Boyd. Roland P. Falkner. 
Samuel Lewis. L. S. Rowe. Commissioners. 

September 16, 1913. 

In the jnatter of sundry claims, docket No. 1,240-A, 
etc. — In the case of the claims hereinafter noted, the 
evidence before the Commission showed that the prop- 
erties claimed had been voluntarily abandoned by the 
claimants a number of years before the claim was filed 
with the Joint Land Commission, By reason of such 
abandonment any rights which these persons may 
have had to the properties in question lapsed, and such 
parties are not entitled to an award from the Joint 
Commission. 

In view of the abandonment of the properties the 
claims of the following persons are hero)»y dismissed: 

triicero. Cristobal. — Claim for improvement-^ located 
on the public land, tract No. 17 of the property map 
of the Canal Zone. 

Rodriguez, Jacinla. — Claim for improvements located 
on the public land, tract No. 16 of the property map 
of the Canal Zone. 

Rojas de Padilla, Virginia, docket No. 360, — Claim 
for houses and other improvements at Old Frijoles. 

(Signed) Federico Boyd, Roland P. Falkner 
Samuel Lewis. L. S. Rowe, Commissioners. 

September 20, 1913. 



The names of such persons, their docket numbers, the 
tax numbers of the houses included in such agreement, 
and their location, follow: 

Docket. Tax 
Name. No. No. Locality. 

Baptiste. John 906 244 Gamboa 

Fever. Eugene 850 1028 Catmito Mulato 

Jimenez, Marco 302 Cruces 

Johnjack, Mesma 1 184 

1167 Loma de Taber- 
nilla 

Julians, Victor 934 223 Gamboa 

Marcado, Valdimiro Cauo Quebrado 

Mollino, Jinia 291 Cruces 

Navas, Appohnia 309 Crucea 

Rodriguez, V., Maria 1065 211 Gamboa 

Urriola, Margarita 308 Cruces 

Vasqucz, Vicenti Juan Grande 

Villereal, Jos = 289 Cruces 

Watson, Elijah 1084 . . . Juan Grande 

(Waterloo) 

Castillon, Dionisio 318 Cruces 

Larin. Narcisa 1478 . . . Cano Quebrado 

Pardo. Francisco 336 Cruces 

In view of the agreements before noted these claims 
call for no further action by this Commission, and 
they are accordingly dismissed. 

(Signed) Federico Boyd, Rola?^ P. Falkner. 
Samuel Lewis. L. S. Rowe, Commissioners. 

September 22, 1913. 

In the matter of sundry claims at Matachin. docket 
No. 6IS-A, etc. — In the case of the claimants named 
below who are occupiers of that portion of the original 
estate of Matachin, which was purchased by the French 
Canal Company and subsequently became the property 
of the United States, an examination of the evidence 
shows that they entered_jipon possession of the lands 
on which they claim improvements under lea^s from 
the Isthmian Canal Commission. 

In a decision in the case of Agusta Dunlop, rendered 
April 16. 1913, the Commission said: 

"We have therefore reached the conclusion that 
it is not within the province of the Joint Land 
Commission to take cognizance of claims arising 
out of the revocation of revocable leases or licenses 
issued by the Isthmian Canal Commission. Such 
claims have no organic relation to the grants con- 
tained in the Treaty, nor to the international obli- 
gations which the United States has agreed to dis- 
charge under the Treaty; and for the adjudication 
of all such claims, the claimants must seek a 
remedy tlirough the procedure afforded by munici- 
pal laws." 

In accordance with the foregoing decision, the claima 
of the following persons are hereby dismissed : 

Arias, Ricardo, for House 149, and other improve- 
ments. 

Ayarza, Victor, docket No. 1,430. for house, tax No. 
119, and other improvements. 

Callender. Louise, estate of. for house, tax No 125. and 
other improvements. 

Cesaire. Boula. in docket No. 930, for house, tax No. 
649. 

Sing. Man. for house, taxNo. 127, and other improve- 
ments. 

(Signed) Federico Boyd, Rol.a,nd P. Falkner, 
Samuel Lewis, L. S. Rowe, Commissioners. 
Se.itembcr 19. I9I3. 



In the matter of sundry claims, docket No. 1,240-A, 
532- A. 1.245-A, etc. — With reference to the claims for 
improvements of the persons hereinafter named, the 
evidence before the Commission is that they have 
signed agreements for the sale of their houses and other 
improvements to the Isthmian Canal Commission. 



In the matter of sundry claims located as below designa^ 
ted. docket No. 1,240-A — In the case of the claimant* 
named below, an examination of the evidence shows 
that the properties which they now claim were held 
under leases from the Panama railroad, which leases 
provide that on the revocation of the lease the lessee 
shall remove all improvements which he has made, and 
which leases in the cases here named have been duly 
cancelled. 

The claims for damages in these cases have no organ- 
ic relation to the grants contained in the Treaty, nor to 
the obligation which the United States has agreed to 
discharge under the Treaty. The relationship is one 
existing between the claimants and the Panama Rail- 
road Company, and if any damage was suffered by 
reason of the cancellation of these leases, the courts of 
the Canal Zone are the proper forum for the assertion 
of such claims. 

In accordance with the principles herein formulated ; 
the claims of tlie following persons are dismissed be- 
cause of lack of jurisdiction, to-wit: 

Ciiticrrez, Jose Carmen, for house, tax No. 1,003, at 
West San PaBlo. 

White. Aleo, docket No. 1.525, for houses, tax Nos. 
1,072 and 1. 082 at San Pablo. 

While. Wong, docket No. 1,60S, for houses, tax Nos, 
1.095 and 1.098 at San Pablo. 

(Signed) Federico Boyd. Roland P. Falknhr. 
Samuel Lewis. L. S. Rowe. Commissioners. 

September 22. 1913. 

(To be continued.) 



04tob»r 22, 1913. 



THE CANAL RECORD 



85 



PANAMA RAILROAD CROSS-TIES 



Black Guayacum Variety Laid In Early Days Has 
Stood Test of Time. 

The chief engineer of the Panama railroad 
has prepared a report of the use and life of 
hardwood ties laid in the roadbed of the line 
since 1S78, and specifications under which 
they have been purchased since the United 
States assumed control of the road. The re- 
port, in part, is, as follows: 

The original track of the Panama railroad, 
as it existed in 1885, before being disturbed 
in any way by Canal operations, was laid 
with small hardwood ties obtained on the 
Isthmus, and from Colombia. The greater 
part of these ties were procured from the north 
coast of Colombia, and were shipped to Colon 
from the port of Barranquilla. They were of 
a variety of wood commonly known as lig- 
num vitae {guayacum recina), and now spoken 
of as black guayacum, to distinguish it from 
yellow guayacum, a wood of the same family, 
but with less power of resistance to mechani- 
cal wear or decay. 

Other varieties of wood, such as balsamo 
(or quira), and polvillo, were procured by the 
company, but the only species available at the 
present time are a few balsamo ties, which 
were laid in the old track near Mount Hope 
in 1900, and which were taken out of the 
roadbed last year, and replaced by a larger 
tie. Practically, the only wood that has stood 
the test of time is the black guayacum, pro- 
cured in the early days of the railroad's opera- 
tions. 

The guayacum ties procured by the old 
company were very small, being "pole" ties, 
about five to six inches thick, with a 6 to 
7-inch face, eight feet long; some of them 
were quite crooked and irregular in shape. 
These carried the light trafific of the railroad 
prior to American Canal operations without 
difficulty, but when construction work was 
begun in earnest, it was found necessary to 
replace the small ties with those of a larger 
dimension. 

There has been so much said about the 
long life of these hardwood ties that it would 
be well to set forth what little authentic in- 
formation is available. The following are 
extracts from the annual reports since 1878: 

1880 — About 5,000 new lignum vitae ties 
have been placed in the track. 

1884 — During the year, 30,000 new lignum 
vitae ties have been put in, and during the 
coming year, 3,000 additional will be required. 

1885— During the year 1885, 10,000 lignum 
vitae ties have been received and put in the 
roadbed. The existing contract for the 30,000 
spoken of in the annual report of 1884 will 
complete the work for the present. 

1886 — The number of lignum vitae ties 
put in the road in 1885 amounted to 10,000, 
while in 1886, over 20,000 have been received. 

1888 — The number of lignum vitae ties 
placed in the main line during the year was 
5,456, and upon deviations, 8,747. 

1889 — Such is the durability of lignum vitae 
cross-ties used in the track that only 5,855 
new ones were required for the year. 

1890 — The track has been kept in excellent 
condition, although only 4,014 lignum vitae 
ties were received during the year. 

1 89 1 — The general condition of the roadbed 
and track continues excellent. Only 6,167 
lignum vitae ties were laid during the year. 
The e.xceptional durability of these ties 
(about 30 years, when of good quality) re- 



duces the number of yearly requirements to 
small proportions. 

1892 — Four thousand one hundred and 
twelve lignum vitae ties were laid. 

1893 — Four thousand five hundred and 
seven genuine lignum vitae ties were laid, 
and 2,539 of native hardwoods for sidings. 

1894 — Seven thousand one hundred and 
ninety-six lignum vitae ties were laid. 

1895 — Ten thousand two hundred and 
twenty lignum vitae ties were laid. 

The main line of the railroad was first 
double-tracked from White House (near Las 
Cascadas) to Tabernilla, to provide for the 
movement of the spoil trains to and from the 
Tabernilla dumps, and it was found necessary 
to remove many of the small hardwood ties 
from the roadbed in this section, on account 
of the increased traffic. These small ties 
were allowed to remain in the track in the 
section between Empire and Culebra, where 
the line was double-tracked, and where the 
traffic was comparatively light. There are 
many of these old ties still in use in the road- 
bed in that section. 

The hardwood ties laid in the old track 
were, generally speaking, in very good con- 
dition. There were little, if any, signs of 
decay, but in many ca^es, especially with the 
smaller cies, they were badly worn at the rail 
seat by the mechanical action of the base of 
the rail, no ti.e plates being used on the ties. 
They were also "spike killed," caused by re- 
placing spikes and changing rail. It will be 
interesting to note that many of the ties 
removed from the main track at that time, 
and later, are now being relaid on the tracks 
connecting with the new terminal docks at 
Cristobal. The timber in the ties is practical- 
ly as good as ever. As their smaller size is 
not objectionable in the yard tracks, it is 
expected that they will still have a long life 
in other services. Tie plates are not necessary 
with these ties, which results in some saving. 

The mechanical wear on the old hardwood 
ties in contradistinction to the decay of the 
wood is demonstrated by the fact that while 
the base of the rail, and the driven spikes 
have cut into the hardwood and weathered it, 
the material in the balance is as good as ever. 
The same experience has, of course, long 
been encountered and commented upon in the 
tie records of the United States. The differ- 
ence between the experience there and here, 
however, lies in the fact that the ties referred 
to in the former records have probably not 
been used for a period longer than eight to 10 
years, while local hardwood ties are from 
20 to 25 years old, and have been used in a 
tropical climate where all other wood decays 
in from three to five years. 

The black guayacum cross-tie is probably a 
thing of the past. Such material is now so 
valuable for other purposes in connection 
with machinery and manufacturing arts, 
that it is not to be expected that it can be 
procured at reasonable prices for cross-ties. 
The Panama Railroad Company has procured 
only 4,000 or 5,000 guayacum cross-ties in 
the past six years, and most of these have 
been of the inferior variety known as yellow 
guayacum. 

During the past few years guayacum cross- 
ties have been purchased under the following 
prices and specifications: 

1S98-1901. 
First-class — 6 by 8 inches, by 8 feet, S1..S0 eacii. 
Second-class — Si by 6 inches, by 7.9 feet. $1 each. 

1907. 
First-class — 6 by 8 inches, by 8 feet, $1.62 each. 



Second-class — SJby 7 inches, by 7.9feet, $1.42 each. 

1908-1910. 
First-class — 7 by 9 inches, by 8.6 feet. $2.10 each. 
Second-class — 6) by 8 inches, by 8.3 feet. $1.75 each. 

1911. 
First-class — 7 by 9 inches, by S.6 feet. $2.25 ejch. 
Second class — 6} by S inches, by 8.3 feet, $1.75 each. 

SPECIFICATIONS. 

1. The material used shall be black or yel- 
low guayacum, commonly known as guayacan 
or lignum vitae. 

2. All ties shall be well and smoothly hewed 
out of straight growing timber of specified 
dimensions, and out of wind, sawed, or square 
cut ends, with straight and parallel sides and 
faces. All ties shall have bark entirely re- 
moved when cut. Ties shall be free of splits, 
loose, or decayed knots, or any other imper- 
fections, which may impair their strength or 
durability. Not more than one inch of sap 
wood will be allowed, measured across the side 
or face. 

3. Sawed ties will be accepted agreeing in 
other respects with the above paragraph, 
provided the saw cut extends throughout the 
length of the tie, making parallel sides and 
faces. 

4. Tlie width of the face and the thickness 
of the tie shall conform to sizes mentioned 
in the table of dimensions below, but a varia- 
tion of size will be permitted of one inch over 
in thickness, one inch over in width, and 
three inches over in length. No variation in 
size under those specified will be allowed. 

TABLE OF DIMENSIONS, 





Thick- 
ness. 


Width 
cf face 


Length. 


Maximum va- 
riation from 
straight edge. 




Top and 
bottom. 


Sides. 


First-class, . 

Second-class 


7' 
6i" 


9" 
8" 


f.'6" 

8'3" 


i" 
1" 


2" 
3" 



Not more than 10 per cent of any particular 
shipment will be accepted as seconds, and it is 
desired to reduce this percentage as much 
as possible. 

♦ 

Emigration from the Isthmus Continues. 

According to the figures of the quarantine 
service nearly 2,500 more people left the Isth- 
mus in September than landed, constituting 
the largest exodus in any one month since 
the beginning of the Canal work. 

The total number of steamship passengers 
who embarked at Colon for foreign ports 
during the month was 5,371, consisting of 
2,279 cabin, and 3,092 steerage passengers. 
The number of passengers who landed at 
Colon from foreign ports was 2,849, consist- 
ing of 1,600 cabin, and 1,249 steerage pas- 
sengers. The number of persons who era- 
barked over those who landed at this port 
was 2,522. The immigration from the West 
India islands consisted of 172 cabin, and 802 
deck passengers, an increase in cabin, but 
a slight reduction in steerage passengers, as 
compared with August. Of the steerage pas- 
sengers from other countries, Colombia fur- 
nished 130, and Costa Rica 77. There were 
only 96 steerage passengers from Europe dur- 
ing the entire month. The number of persons 
arriving "in transit." practically all tourists, 
was 1,806, a decrease of 601, as compared 
with the preceding month. 

The number of persons who landed at the 
ports of Ancon and Panama during Septem- 
ber from foreign ports was 487, consisting of 
352 cabin, and 135 steerage passengers. The 
number of persons who embarked for foreign 
ports during the same period was 450, con- 



86 



THE CANAL RECORD 



Vol. VII, No. 9. 



sisting of 356 cabin, and 94 steerage pas- 
sengers. The number of those who landed over 
those who embarked was 37. The net emigra- 
tion from the Isthmus during September was 
2,485. The total number of vessels arriving 
at Colon during the month was 93, and at 
the port of Ancon, 23. 



COMMISSION CLUBHOUSES. 



Red Cross Finances. 
The financial stacetuent of the Canal Zone 
Chapter, American National Red Cross, for 
the month of September, 1913, follows: 

RECEIPTS. 

September 1, On hand $2,018.21 

September 18, F r o m disbursing 
Officer, !. C. C, 
for piano sold at 
Culebra 80.00 

September 30. Membsrship dues.. 3.00 

September 30, Received to date, 
account of Red 
Cross ball 827.50 

Total receipts $2,928.71 

DISBURSEMENTS. 

September 6. Relief of destitute 

missionary , Ancon 75 . 00 

September 6, Disbursing Officer, 

I. C. C. printing. 2.67 

September 13, Relief of Jamaican 
woman at Colon, 
deported by I. C. 
C 3.00 

Sep:ember 13, Relief of family of 
employe at Ancon, 
repatriated to Ja- 
maica 15.00 

September 17, Belief of destitute 
American, Cristo- 
bal 23.25 

Total disbursements S118.92 

September 30, Balance on hand S2,,v09 . 79 

John L. Phillips, 
Approved: Treasurer. 

Edw. Schildhauer, 

Chairman. 



The "Gold Hill Line." 

The so-called "Gold Hill line" is 95 miles in 
length, from the south end of the Chagres 
River bridge to the junction with the pre- 
viously operated line at Pedro Miguel. Just 
south of the bridge it swings eastward of the 
95-foot berm and passes around Gold Hill 
on a high level. Its highest point is 271 
feet above sealevel, near the La Pita divide; 
the continental divide is crossed opposite 
Culebra, at an elevation of 241 feet above sea- 
level. The grading was completed in March, 
1912, and the completed track was turned 
over to the railroad by the Canal Commis- 
sion on May 25, 1912, since which it has been 
used for through freight trains, and, on oc- 
casions, for special passenger trains. 



Married. 

TORBERT-MORCHIO— At the Ancon Chapel, on 
Saturday, September 13. at 8.30 p. m., Miss Maria Cata- 
lina Morchio of Genoa. Italy, to Mr. William A. Torbert 
of Miami, Fla.. the Rev. H. R. Carson officiating. Canal 
Zone residence. Balboa. 

DAILY-G.'^LE — At the Union church, Cristobal, 
on October. 13, Miss Mabel Louise Gale of Imperial. 
Gal., to Mr. John D. Daily of Monticello. la., the Rev. 
C. O. Purdy officiating. Canal Zone residence, Gatun. 

WEDDOE-BALLARD — On October 11. in the 
Union Church, Criito'j.il. Miss Ada Mae Ballard of 
Joliet. III., to Mr. James Andrew Weddoe of Pulaski. 
Va. Canal Zone residence. Corozal. 



Lost — On October 18, in Empire shops, one hotel 
book, containing about i2 coupons: o,!e commissary 
book. ne,v. S15. cue commissary book, old. containing 
coupons to the value of 14 cents, and one metal check. 
No. 187032. Finder is requested to return articles to 
office of general foreman, Empiie shops. 

Lost — On Monday, October 13. between 2 and 4 
p. m., a gold and enamel belt buckle, either in the 
Cristobal commissary, or on Front street. Colon, in 
going to the railroad station. Finder is requested to 
communicate with Mrs. S. R. Hart, Box 52, Cristobal. 
Reward. 



Activities of the Young Men's Christian Associa- 
tion. 

general. 

The following is the schedule for moving pictures for 
the week October 27 to November 1: Monday, Em- 
pire; Tuesday. Gatun; Wednesday. Culebra; Thurs- 
day. Empire; Friday. Porto Bello; Saturday, Cristobal. 

The standing in the chess tournament is. as follows: 
Culebra won 15 points; Empire, 10; Cristobal, seven, 
and Gatun. si.x. 

The standing in the bowling league, October 20, was, 
as follows: 

Team. Won. Lost. P. C. 

Cristobal 7 2 778 

Corozal 6 3 667 

Empire 5 .... 4 556 

Culebra 5 4 556 

Gatun 1 5 167 

Camp Elliott 6 000 

The standing in the basketball league, October 20 
was. as follows: 

Empire 4 .... .... 1.000 

Gatun 3 1 750 

Camp Elliott 3 1 750 

Culebra 1 3 250 

Cristobal 1 .... 3 250 

Coronal .... 4 000 

COROZAL. 

The Corozal bowling team won three games on Satur- 
day night. October 18, from the Marines of Camp 
Elliott. All games were close as shown by the follow- 
ing scores: 

Camp Elliott. Corozal. 

Donell 215 181 141 Louch 188 138 161 

Weis 147 148 223 Ziller 133 

Ogl 164 132 149 Bordt 168 193 128 

Hoffman... 127 185 125 Parkis 203 192 173 

Thompson.. 157 170 139 Edwards... 181 162 154 
Davis 179 178 



Totals.... 810 815 777 873 864 794 

High scores in duckpins for the week ending Satur- 
day. October 18. were, asfollows: Owens. 101, Burke, 
102; Beall. 109. Tenpins— Ziher. 201. 205. 242, 213; 
Davis. 202; Parkis. 205. 232; Taylor, 211, 231. 200. 

The Corozal tenpin team will not bowl on Saturday 
night. October 25. but will bowl Empire on the Corozal 
alleys on November 1. 

Although the Corozal basketball team is badly crip- 
pled by the absence of four of the players, who started 
the season with the team, they will play Culebra at 
Empire on Wednesday night, and Empire at Empire on 
Saturday night of this week. 

culedra. 

On Wednesday night, October 15, the Culebra basket- 
ball team was defeated by the Camp Elliott team on the 
Empire floor by the score of 41 to 19. The line-up was: 

Camp Elliott — Smith and Harper, forwards; Murray, 
center: McElroy. and Briggs. guards. 

Culebra — Stripling. Worscly. and Bracket, forwards; 
Gassnian, center: Rose, and Blumenberg, guards. 

The Camp Elliott bo^vling team will bowl at Culebra 
on Friday night, October 24. 

EMPIRE. 

The Isthmian league bowling game between Empire 
and Cristobal, played Saturday, October 18, resulted 
in favor of Cristobal. Scores: 
Empire 812 787 801 Cristobal... 795 888 836 

For the remainder of the bowling series, the home 
games for Camp Elliott will be bowled on Nos. 1 and 2 
alleys at the Empire clubhouse. 

On Wednesday evening, October 15, the Culebra 
chess club played the Empire club at Empire, with the 
following results: 

Culebra. Empire. 

Dubois Caldwell 1 

McClure 1 Goolsby 1 

Warner, A. M Hall 1 

Warner, J. F 1 Smith 

Second play. 

Dubois 1 Goolsby 

McClure Hall 1 

Warner, A. M 1 Smith.. 

Totals 4 4 

The results of the chess tournament games played 

with Cristobal on Saturday, October 18, were: 

Cristobal. Won Empire. Won. 

Hunt Caldwell 1 

Taylor Goolsby 1 

Tuttle 1 Brady 

Wilson Smith 1 

Second play. 

Hunt Smith 1 

Tuttle Goolsby 1 

Taylor Caldwell 1 

Wilson 1 Brady 

Totals 2 6 

At the meeting of the Empire debating club, held 
Friday evening, October 17, the following question 



was debated : "Should what is popularly known as the 
unwritten law be given credence in court." The speak- 
ers were Messrs. Morrison and DeBarrows for the 
affirmative, and Messrs. Swanson and Patterson for 
the negative. The judges were Messrs. McColley, 
Rossiter, and Harris, and decided in favor of the 
negative. 

GATUN. 

The Empire basketball team defeated the local team 
on Saturday night. October 18. The score was 41 to 18. 
F. G. Swanson acted as referee. Mr. V\'. B. Childers. 
mayor of Gatun, made a few remarks before the game, 
congratulating the Empire team on its splendid record, 
and expressing the appreciation of the Gatun public 
for the work the Gatun team has done so far this 
season. 

Mr. C. B. Russell will act as secretary during the 
leave of absence of Mr. Frank Gardner Smith, who 
sailed for the United States on the Carl Schnrz on Tues- 
day, October 21. on si.v weeks" vacation. 

Culebra took two out of three games of tenpins at 
Gatun on Saturday, October IS. 

The results of the chess match between Culebra 
and Gatun on Saturday, October 18, were 5 to 3 in 
favor of Culebra: 

Culebra. Won. Gatun. Won. 

Dubois 1 Brown 1 

McClure 2 Carson 

Warner. A. M 1 Logan 2 

Warner. J. F 1 Marquard 

Mrs. Dow Walker played several piano selections 
for the motion picture entertainment at Gatun on Fri- 
day evening, October 17. 

CRISTOBAL. 

On Wednesday evening. October 15 a chess match 
between local teams resulted, as follows; 

Rattner 2 Verner 

Ogden 2 Taylor 

Tuttle 1 Wilson 1 

Martin Hurt .' 2 

Totals 5 3 

All postponed tenpin games will be bowled on or be- 
fore October 25. at which time the local bowling 
tournament closes. 

An unmarried folks tournament in duckpins will be 
be held on Monday. October 27. It is the intention to 
hold a married folks tournament and an unmariied 
folks tournament on the second and fourth Monday 
nights of each month, respectively. 

The Cristobal basketball team defeated Corozal on 
Saturday, October IX. Score 35 to 7. Luce threw nine 
field goals and six foul goals. The line-up was. as 
follows: Corozal — Dougherty, Howe, Bessy, Ross, 
Kenealy. and Russell. Cnsloial — Mathews, Luce. 
Simons. Hughes, and Barcroft. 

The Cristobal junior basketball team was defeated 
by the Panama National Institute team on Saturday, 
October 18. Score, 16 to 14. The juniors are open to 
challenge. 

Sixty-six were in attendance at the discussion club 
on Thursday night, October 16 to hear Dr. C. C. 
Pierce on "Sex hygiene." Subject for discussion on 
Thursday night, October 23 will be "Shall candidates 
for marriage hold health certiiicates?" with Mr. J. M. 
Weaver in charge. On Wednesday night, October 29 , 
Mr. W. W. Warwick, assistant comptroller of the 
treasury, will speak. 

An old fashioned All Hallowe'en social will be held 
on Thursday night. October 30. The games, re- 
freshments, and decorations will be suited to the 
occasion. 

Mr. H. D. Brittin. who has been connected with the 
Jersey City Y. M. C. A., arrived on the steamship 
Advance, on Saturday, October 11. to assume the 
physicial directorship at the Cristobal clubhouse. 

PORTO BELLO. 

A set of new books for the library has been ordered 
from t he United States, and will be here in a short time. 

A number of new phonograph records have been 
addf^d to tht collection. 

The handicap pool tournament, which has been in 
progress for the last few weeks lias been concluded. 
The hnal standings are: 

Name. Won. Lost. P. C. 

Bucklin 12 1 923 

»Smith 11 ..... 2 833 

Bowen 11 2 833 

Heil 10 3 769 

Cummings 7 .... 5 583 

Murray 7 5 583 

Keene 7 .... 6 538 

Colberg 7 6 538 

Doyle 5 8 385 

J. D. Sherrard 4 8 333 

Chase 4 9 307 

Englebrecht 2 11 154 

T. W. Sherrard 2 11 154 

Thompson 1 12 077 

*Smith and Bowen were tied for second place, and on 
the play-otf. Smith won the game. 100 to 60. receiving 
the silver medal. Bowen was awarded a bronze medal. 



October 22, 1913. 



THE CANAL RECORD 



87 



OFFICIAL CIRCULARS. 



November 3 a Holiday. 

CVLEBRA. C. Z.. October 14. 1913. 
Circular No. 503: 

Monday. November 3, 1913. the anniversar>* of the 
independence of the Republic of Panama, will be ob- 
served as a holiday in the Canal Zone, and as far as 
practicable all public business will be suspended on that 
day. Geo. W. Goethals. 

Chairman and Chief Engineer. 



Acting Head of the Fifth Division. 

CULEBRA. C. Z., October 16. 1913. 
CmcuL.\R No. 509: 

Effective this date, and during the absence of Mr. 
H. O. Cole on leave. Mr. Robert B. Tinsley. superin- 
tendent, will be in charge of the work of the Fifth Divi- 
sion of the Chief Engineer's Office. 

Geo. \V. Goethals, 

Chairman. 



Chief Clerk. Office of the Chairman. 

CULEBRA, C. Z.. October 11, 1913. 
Circular No. 507: 

Effective October 13. 1913, Mr. \Vm. H. May will, in 
addition to his duties as Secretary to the Chairman, 
take over the duties of the chief clerk during the ab- 
sence on leave of Mr. C. A. Mcllvaine. 

Geo. W. Goethals. 

Chairman. 



Handling of Brass and Copper Scrap. 

CuLEBRA. C. Z.. October 18, 1913. 
Circular No. 426-c: 

Special attention is directed to the necessity for ex- 
ercising more care in the handling of brass and copper 
scrap, which is very valuable salvage. This applies 
particularly to scrap materia! or equipment composed 
partly of brass and copper. It has been noticed around 
various shops and at points where construction work 
is being carried on that brass valves, copper wire, sheet 
copper and various other items of this character are 
mixed with iron and steel shop scrap. During the month 
of September, the salvage gang at Mount Hope re- 
covered over 11.000 lbs. of brass and copper scrap, 
after sorting over shop scrap turned in from the line. 
Such material should be carefully segregated in sepa- 
rate piles and turned over to the nearest district 
quartermaster or storekeeper. Q. M. D., at least once 
a week, for if it is allowed to lie around, loss will be in- 
curred. Gfo. \V. Goethals. 

Chairman. Isihmian Canal Commission. 
President, Panama Railroad Company, 



Accountability for Rolling Stock. 

CULEBRA. C. Z.. October 9, 1913. 
CiRCtJLAR No. 1S3-2-2: 

Effective October 10, 1913, the accountability for all 
rolling stock, over which the superintendent of trans- 
portation has control, will be transferred on Form Q. M. 
D. 4, to the accountability of Mr. J. C. Keller, Corozal. 

Mr. Keller will consolidate memorandum receipts he 
holds for rolling stock and obcain memorandum receipts 
from the superintendent of era asportation, who will be 



the responsible officer for all rolling stock under his 
jurisdiction. Geo. VV. Goethals, 

Chairman and Chief Engineer. 



Submission of Work Requests. 

CULEBRA. C. Z.. October 15. 1913. 
Heads of Departments and Divisions: 

Hereafter, when submitting work request. Form C. 
E.-159-2. the original and fire copies must be for\varded 
to this office when the work is to be performed by a de- 
partment or division of the Isthmian Canal Commission, 
and the original and ten copies when the work is to be 
performed by the Panama Railroad Company. 

Attention is also called to the fact that the estimated 
cost of the work to be performed must be shown in every 
instance where it is practicable to do so. 

Geo. W. Goethals. 

Chairman. 



Preparation of Contracts. 

CULEBRA. C. Z., October 13, 1913. 
CiRCLT_\R No. 505: 

Hereafter, all contracts made by the Isthmian Canal 
Commission or the Panama Railroad Company on the 
Isthmus will be prepared by the Chief Quartermaster, 
with the advice of the Chief Counsel or the Examiner 
of Accounts when necessary-. 

Geo. W. Goethals. 

Chairman. 



Appointment of Superintendent of Schools. 

Ancon. C. Z., October 18. 1913. 
Circular No. 117: 

To Heads of Departments and Divisions — Effective 
today. Mr. Albert R. Lang is appointed superintendent 
of Canal Zone schools, vice Mr. Frank P. Wagg, re- 
signed. 

Richard L. Metcalfe. 
Head of Department oj Civil Administration. 



SaiHng of the *'Cristobal.** 

Pana%u. Ratlroad Company, 
Office of Gener.4.l Sltperintendent. 
Colon, R. p.. October 20, 1913. 
Circular No. 245: 

To All Concerned — The sailing date of the steamship 
Cristobal has been set at 3 p. m.. October 25. from Pier 
11, Cristobal. F. Mears, 

Aclitig General Superintendent. 



Suspension of Interlocking Service at Tower R. 

Office of General Superintendent, 
Panama Railroad Company. 
Colon, R. P.. October 15, 1913. 
G. S. Bulletin No. 12: 

The interlocking plant at Tower R will be put out of 
scrviceatI2o'clock noon, Friday, the 17th instant, and 
switches will be handled by switch tenders as long as 
required. 

Train order signal at Tower R and signals at south 
end Canal siding, will continue to be controlled from 



Reduced Rates to Employes — United Fruit Company's Service. 

CULEBRA, C. Z.. October 15. 1913. 
The following reduced rates are quoted by the United Fruit Company for employes of the Commission and 
the P-i.n.im.t Railroad Company: 



In suites. 



Between New York ant) Colon. 



One 
way. 



Round 
tri->. 



In staterooms with > 
bath. 



One 
way. 



.\dults $101.25 $19^.00 



Children 8 to 12 years old. 

Children, 3 to 8 years old 

Children under 3 years of age not occupying seat at 

table, or berth in stateroom I 

If more than one child under 3 years of age, for each| 

additional child ; 



50.65 
25.35 



Free 
25.35 



99.00 
49.50 



Free 
49.50 



$76.25 
38.15 
19.10 

Free 

19.10 



Round 
trip. 



In staterooms 
without bath. 

Round 
trip. 



One 
way. 



$150.50 
75.25 
37.65 

Free 

37.65 



$56.25 $112.50 
28.15 - 56.30 
14.05 ■ 28.10 



Free 
14.05 



Free 
28.10 



Between New Orleans and Colo.n. 



In suites. 
One I Round 
way. I .trip. 



In staterooms 
without bath. 



One 
way. 



Round 
trip. 



Adults 

Ch ildren. 8 to 1 2 years old 

Children. 3 to 8 years old '. 

Children under 3 years of age not occupying seat at table, or berth in state- 
room 

If more than one child under 3 years of age, for each additional child 



$65.00 
32.50 
16.25 

Free 
16.25 



$127.50 ' S40.00 $75.00 
63.75 ! 20.00 37.50 

31.90 12.50 25.00 



Free 
31.90 



Free 
12.50 



Free 

25.00 



Suites and staterooms with bath will not be sold for less than two full fares. 

In addition, a reduction of 25 per cent will be allowed on fares published in current passeuger tariff botweem 
Port Limoa and Colon, and between Kingston and Colon. 

W. H, May, 
Secretary to the Chairman. 



Tower R until operators are no longer required at this 
point. F. Mears, 

Acting General Superintendent. 



Special Train. 
Panama Railroad Compan-y, 
Freight and Passenger Department, 

Colon, R. P., October 18. 1913. 
All concerned — For the benefit of those desiring to 
witness performances of the Morton Opera Company, 
at the Garden Theatre, Colon, a special train will be 
run from Colon to Gatun. Tuesday and Thursday. 
October 21 and 23. Train will leave Colon passenger 
station at 11.30 p. m. J. C. Angel, 

Freight and Passenger Agent. 



Rainfall, Oct. 1 to Oct. 18 


, 1913. 


Inclusive. 


Stations. 


n o 

2 


Q 


3 ~ 


Pacific Section — 


Ins. 
.88 
1.39 
1.37 
1.88 
1.11 

.90 

1.20 

.95 

.74 

80 

1.38 

l.>5 

2.01 

1.90 

2.17 
2 26 
2 97 
2.93 


S 
11 
11 
11 

3 

S 
3 

S 

s 

9 
9 
9 
11 
11 

14 
S 
5 

11 


Ins. 
3.J8 

6 47 

7 43 


Balboa 


♦Miraflores 






4 06 

3.41 
4.35 
3 52 

3 87 

4 36 
3.SS 

5 20 
9 75 
3 gg 


Central Stciion — 
Culebra 






Gamboa 


Alhajuela 

•ElVigia 


•Frijoles 


♦Monte Lirio 


Atlantic Section — 


7 S6 
9.48 
12,78 
13.78 


*Bra20s Brook 


Colon 


tPorto Bello 





*Standard rain gage — readings at 5 p.m., daily 
Automatic rain gage at unstarred stations — value 
midnight to midnight. 

tTo 5 p. m.. October 17. 



Stages of the Chaftres River and Gatun Lake. 

Maximum heights ol the Chagres River for the week 
ending midnight, Saturday, October 18. 1913. All 
heights are in feet above mean s^.alevel. 







Stations 




D.\Y AND Date. 


Vigia. 


3 
r3 


i 


s 

p 




Sun., Oct. 12 

Mon.. Oct. 13... 
Tijes.,Oct. 14. .. 
Wert.. Oct. .IS. . 
Thurs., Oct. 16.. 

Fri.,Oct. 17 

Sat., Oct. 18 


128 4 

126 6 
128 6 
127.4 
127.2 
13.i 6 

127 6 


94.6 
93.1 
94 4 
93.8 
93 4 
97 8 
93 8 


6S 5 
68 7 

68 9 

69 1 
69 3 
to 5 
69 6 


68 5 
6^ 6 

68 S 
69.0 
(,9.2 

69 4 
69.6 


68 5 
68 7 

68 9 

69 1 
69 3 
f9 5 
69 6 


Height of low wa- 
ter to nearest foot 


125 


91 


44 






♦Sluice gates :n spillw? 
June 27, 1913, with curh 


y at Gatun were closed on 
ce of lake ate levation 48.25. 



Misdirected Letters. 

The following insufficiently addressed letters, oiigi- 
nating in the United States and it;- po=v3KS.^i ns. have 
been received in the ofEce of the Director of Posts, and 
may be secured upon request of the addressees: 



Alexander, Melville 
Allard. T. T. 
Angelear. Lou 
Brown. Capt. Elliott F. 
Burns. Lawrence 
Cauthers. R. A. 
Clarke. William F. 
Dalev, James H. 
Doran. E. 
Duval. William F. 
Enright. John 
Feehan. Harry 
Foster. Wm. A. 
Foune. Harry 
Gilbert. Nat 
Grier. Samuel 
Hancock. Col. G. W. 
Harris, John 
Haymond. O. 
Hitt. Sam 



Holmes. Charles W. 
Hurley. J. 
Jurss. George (2) 
Kelly, Grady 
Kimball. Oliver D. 
King. ^Irs. Anna 
Kitchen. F. K. 
Kraus, Mathew 
Lever, Mrs. W. M. 
Lynn, L. M. 
Mitchell, Joseph 
Ruffo. Dr. J. B. 
Sanford. Chas. & Co. 
Schaeffer, Mrs. Joseph 
Slonaker, C. R. 
Smits. William 
Taylor, Robert H. 
Vasquez. Percival E. 
Weidner. Mrs. Eliz. U. 
Wiggins. Miss Eva 
Wright. J. W, 



Lost — Between Balboa shops, and Panama, oa 
October 10, a diamond ring with "E. F. S.. 1898" 
engraved on the inside. Finder is requested to call at 
Room 24. House 162, East Balboa, and receive reward. 



88 



THE CANAL RECORD 



Vol. VII, No. P. 



COMMISSARY DEPARTMENT. 

The commissary stores are open during the fol- 
lowing hours: 

Cristobal. 8 a. m., to 12.30 p. m.. and 2 to 7 p. m. 

Balboa. 8 a. m. to 12.30 p. m., and 2.30 to 7 p. m. 

Ancon. 8 a. m. to 1 p. m.. and 3 to 6 p.m. 

All other-. 8 a. m. to 1 p. m., and 3 to 7 p. m. 

Retail prices of cold storage provisions effective 
October 21. 1913; 

FRESH MEATS. PrtCe. 

Mutton — Stewing, per pound 6 

Shoulder, neck trimmed off (4 pounds 

and over), per pound 9 

Entire, forequarter (not trimmed, 10 

pounds and over), per pound 8 

Legs (8 to 10 pounds), per pound. ... 17 

Cutlets, per pound 18 

Short cut chops, per pound 20 

Lamb — Stewing, per pound 6 

Entire forequarter, neck trimmed off, 

per pound 9 

Legs (5 to 8 pounds), per pound 20 

Chops, per pound 24 

Cutlets, per pound 24 

Veal — Stewing, per pound 10 

Shoulder, for roasting (not under 4 

pounds) , ppr pound 12 J 

Chops, shoulder, per pound 17 

Chops, per pound 26 

Loin, for roasting per pound 26 

Cutlets, per pound 30 

Beef — Suet . per pound 2 

Soup, per pound 5 

Stew, per pound 8 

Plate, per pound 9 

Corned, No. 1, per pound 14 

Corned, No. 2. per pound 12 

Chuck roast, 3 lbs., and over, per pound . 12 
Rib roast, second cut (not under 3J 

pounds) , per pound 16 

Rib roast, first cut (not under 3 pounds), 

per pound 18 

Pot roast, per pound 19 

Rump roast, per pound 19 

Porterhouse roast, per pound 20 

Steak, Chuck, per pound 12} 

Round, per pound 13 

Rib. per pound 18 

Sirloin, per pound 19 

Rump, per pound 19 

Porterhouse (not less than 1} 

pounds), per pound 20 

Tenderloin (Western), per pound. 30 

Pork — Loin chops or roast , per pound 17 

Hams, fresh, per pound flO 

Shoulders, fresh, per pound f!17 

Spare ribs, per pound 15 

Backbones, per pound IS 

Pigs' feet, each 7 

Pigs' head, ^head 60 

Sausage, home made, per pound 20 

MISCELLANEOUS. 

Livers — Beef, per pound 11 

Calf, each 60 

Half, each 30 

Steak, Hamburger, package 13 

Sausage — Bologna, per pound 13 

Frankfurter, per pound 13 

Lieberwurst. per pound 13 

Devonshire Farm, per pound 20 

Sweetbread, beef, per pound 34 

Eggs, fresh, per dozen t^S 

per J-dozen tl9 

Bluefish. per pound 1 .i 

Hahbut, fresh, per pound 1-^ 

Salmon, per pound 15 

Roe shad, each - 75 

Shad roes, pair 40 

Oysters, quart 35 

POULTRY AND GAME. 

Chickens — Fancy roasting, milk fed,large,each. . 1 40 

Fancy roasting, mild fed. med., each. . 1 . 10 
Fancy roasting, corn fed, about 5 J 

pounds, each 1 .25 

Fancy roasting, corn fed. about 4^ 

pounds, each 1 .00 

Fowls, each tt60, 70, 80, 90, and 1.00 

Ducks. Western (about 4J pounds), each 1.25 

Capons , each 2 . 00 

Broilers, milk fed. each 70 

Broilers, com fed. each 60 

Turkeys, per pound 28 

Squabs, each 50 



Rabbits, skinned, each. 

Partridges, pair 

Grouse, per pair 

Pheasants 

CURED AND PICKLED MEATS. 

Ham — Genuine Westphalia, per pound. 



30 
'1 .30 
1.30 
1.30 

40 

Ham — Sugar cured, per pound 20 

Sliced, per pound 22 

Half . for boiling, per pound 21 

Boiled, per pound 28 

Hocks, per pound t8 

Beef. salt, family, per pound 12 

Bacon — Breakfast, whole piece, per pound 25 

Sliced, per pound 26 

Ham, lunch, per pound 32 

Pork, salt, family, per pound 14 

Ox tongues, each 1 .00 

Pigs' feet, per pound 7 

Tongues, per pound 18 

DAIRY PRODUCTS. 

Butter — Creamery, special, per pound t^S 

Sheffield Farms, extra fancy, per lb 46 7Sth meridian time. 



Price. 

Cheese — Philadelphia cream, cake 10 

Cheese — Roquefort, per pound S5 

Young America, per pound 22 

Swiss, per pound 28 

Edam, each 1 . 00 

Edam, tin 25 

Parmesan, per pound 35 

' Gouda, per pound 30 

Snappy, per cake 10 

Milk (certified), per quart **.20 

Fer-mil-lac. bottle **.20 

Ice cream , quart 1 25 

i-gallon... J50 

VEGETABLES AND FRUITS. 

Beets, per pound 3 

Celery, per head 6 

Cabbage, per pound 3i 

Cucumbers, per pound t6 

Carrots, per pound 3 

Egg plant, per pound 4 

Lettuce, per pound 14 

Onions, per pound 3 

Potatoes, white, per pound 3 

sweet, per pound 2 

Parsley, bunch 5 

Peppers, green, per pound 4 

Romaine, per pound 14 

Squash, per pound 3 

Turnips, per pound 3 

Tomatoes, per pound 5 

Vams. ppi pound ... 3 

Grapes, Malaga and Tokay, per pound 12 

Grape fruii. each 4 

Lemons, per dozen 24 

1-imes. per hundred 80^ 

Pears, per pound 7 

Oranges, Jamaican, per dozen 18 

♦Indicates reduction from last list. 

♦♦Indicates 5 cents allowed for return of bottle. 

tindicates advance on last list. 

ttFowls weigh each, about as follows: 3. 3^, 4. 4}. 
and 5 pounds. Prices are based accordingly; when 
size ordered is not in stock, next lightest weight is 
supplied and refund note sent for difference. 

tSold only from commissaries; no orders taken for 
delivery. 

§Not less than half of a fresh ham or shoulder will be 

sold. 

^ 

Supplies for the Canal. 

The following steamers with supplies for the Isth- 
mian Canal Commission and the Panama Railroad Com- 
pany arrived at the ports of Balboa, Colon, and Cristo- 
bal during the week ending October 11: 

Carrillo, October 5. from New York, with 149 pieces 
furnace material, for Mechanical Division; 440 pieces 
structural material, for First Division; 400 cases lin- 
seed oil. 5 1 cases paper, 5 L cases caustic soda, 1,489 sacks 
oats, for stock. 

Sixaola, October 6. from New Orleans, with 706 bar- 
rels paving brick. 1.603 sacks creosoted blocks, for Sec- 
ond Division; 2.976 pieces sewer pipe, 81 bales cotton 
waste, 1,017 bales hay, 420 pieces lumber, 700 cases 
kerosene, for stock. 

Priyiz Joathim. October 6. from New York, with six 
crates batteries, for Panama railroad; 122 bundles 
pipe, six cases paper, for stock. 

Santa Maria, October 8. from New York, with 64 
reels copper cable. 267 bundles structural material, for 
First Division; 271 pieces sewer pipe, 500 bales splice 
bars. 120 cases soap polish, for stock. 

Tunialha. October 9. from New Orleans, with 2.979 
sacks creosoted blocks. 381 barrels brick, for Second 
Division; 60 barrels alcohol, for Sanitary Department; 
2.659 pieces lumber. 19 rolls cotton duck, 150 bags feed. 
87 bales cotton waste, for stock. 

Colusa, October 10. from Columbia River, with 14 
spud timbers, for Sixth Division; 2,562,846 feet B. M. 
lumber, 1,228 pieces piling, for stock. 

Kalfos, October 10. from Jacksonville, with 306,851 
feet B. M. lumber. 3.402 pieces cross-ties. 780 pieces 
piling, for stock. 

Advance. OctoheT 11, from New York, with llOcrates 
building material, six reels copper cable. 45 cases elec- 
trical machinery. 18.000 pieces conduit, 218 packages 
structural material, for First Division; 18 boxes fire 
brick lor Fifth Division; 83 rolls wire fencing, 133 rolls 
wire cloth and fencing. 2.776 pieces structural iron, for 
Mechanical Division; 25 drums chloride of lime, for 
Division of Municipal Engineering; 150 rolls roofing 
paper. 316 drums lubricating oil. for stock; and a mis- 
cellaneous cargo, the whole. consisting of 22,838 pack- 
ages, weighing 217 tons. 



MOVEMENT OF OCEAN VESSELS. 



Tide Table. 

The following table shows the time of high and low 
tide at Panama for Jie week ending November I, 1913: 



Date. 


High Low 


High 


Low 


Oct. 26 

Oct. 27... 


A.M. A.M. 

12.12 6 35 
1.13 7.32 
2 OS 1 8.23 

2 51 1 9 10 

3 37 1 9 57 
4.20 ltO.40 
5 02 ,11.24 


P.M. 

12.43 

1.42 

2.34 

3 21 

4 05 
4 50 
S.3S 


P.M. 
7.00 
7. S3 




8.43 


Oct. 29 

Oct. 30 

Oct. 31 

Nov. 1 


9.30 
10 15 
11.00 
11.44 



The following is a list of sailings of the Panama 
Railroad Steamship Line; of the Royal Mail Steam 
Packet Company; of the Hamburg-American Line, 
and of the United Fruit Company's Line. 

NEW YOKK TO CRISTOBAL.* 

AUianca P. R. R. . Thursday. . . Oct. 16 

Colon P. R.R.. Wednesday.. Oct. 22 

Advance P. R. R.. Tuesday Oct. 2S 

Panama P. R. R. .Monday Nov. 3 

Alhanca P. R. R.. Monday Nov. 10 

Colon P. R.R.. Monday Nov. 17 

Advance P. R. R. .Saturday. . . .Nov. 22 

Panama PR. R.. Saturday Nov. 29 

AUianca P. R. R.. Friday Dec. S 

CRISTOBAL TO NEW YORK.* 

Panama P. R. R..Wednesday . .Oct. 22 

AUianca P. R. R.. Tuesday Oct. 28 

Colon P. R. R.. Tuesday Nov. 4 

Advance P. R. R. Sunday Nov. 9 

Panama P. R. R.. Sunday Nov. 16 

AUianca P. R. R. .Saturday Nov. 22 

Colon P. R. R.. Saturday Nov. 29 

Advance P. R. R. . Friday Dec. S 

NEW YORK TO COLON. ' 

Zacapa U. F. C. . Wednesday . .Oct. IS 

Emil L. Boas H.-A Saturday Oct. 18 

Tenadores U. F. C. Saturday Oct. 18 

Almirante U. F. C. . Wednesday . . Oct. 22 

Tagus R. M.... Saturday Oct. 25 

CarrUlo U. F. C. Saturday Oct. 25 

Prinz Joachim H.-A Saturday Oct. 2S 

Santa Marta U. F. C. . Wednesday . . Oct. 29 

Pastores U. F. C. Saturday Nov. 1 

Carl Schurz H.-A Saturday. . . .Nov. 1 

Metapan U. F. C Wednesday . .Nov. 5 

Prinz August WUhelm H.-A Saturday .... Nov. 8 

Tivives U. F. C. Saturday Nov. 8 

Oruba R. M Saturday Nov. 8 

Zacapa U. F. C. Wednesday . .Nov. 12 

COLON TO NEW YORK. 

Metapan U. F. C. Thursday.. . .Oct. 23 

Oruba R. M.... Tuesday Oct. 28 

Tivives U. F. C. Monday Oct. 27 

Prinz August WUhelm. H.-A Tuesday Oct. 28 

Zacapa U. F. C. Thursday Oct. 30 

EmU L. Boas H.-A Tuesday Nov. 4 

Tenadores U. F. C. . Tuesday Nov. 4 

Almirante U. F. C. .Thursday Nov. 6 

Trent R. M Tuesday Nov. U 

Carrillo U. F. C. Tuesday Nov. 11 

Prinz Joachim H.-A Tuesday Nov. 11 

Santa Marta U. F. C. Thursday Nov. 13 

Carl Schurz H.-A Tuesday Nov. 18 

NEW ORLEANS TO COLON. 

Sixaola U. F. C. Saturday Oct. 18 

Cartage U. F. C. Wednesday. .Oct. 22 

Turrialba U. F. C. Saturday Oct. 25 

Heredia U. F. C. Wednesday . .Oct. 29 

COLON TO NEW ORLEANS. 

Abangarez U. F. C. . Thursday Oct. 23 

Parismina U. F. C. Saturday Oct. 25 

Sixaola U. F. C. Thursday.. . .Oct. 30 

♦Amended schedule, resulting from temporary with- 
drawal of the AUianca for repairs. 

Panama Railroad Company's steamers sail from Pier 
11. Cristobal, at 3 p. m. 

Royal MaU steamers leave for New York on alter- 
nate Tuesdays at 1 p. m.; for Southampton on alter- 
nate Tuesdays at 10 a. m. 

United Fruit Company's ships for New Orleans 
direct, leave on Thursdays and Saturdays at 3 p. m.; 
ships for New York via Kingston, on Tuesdays at 1.30 
p. m. and Thursdays at 1.30 p. m.; for Bocas del Toro 
on Mondays at 5 p. m.; for Limon, via Bocas del 
Tore, on "Tuesdays at 5 p. m. ; and for Limon direct, 
Tuesdays at 3 p. m. 

Hamburg-American steamers saU for New York, via 
Kingston and Santiago de Cuba, on Tuesdays; the 
Prinz Joachim and Prinz August IVilhelm at 10 a. m., 
and the Emtl L. Boas and Carl Schurz at 2 p. m. 

The Panamanian Steamship Company's Panama will 
saU from Panama for Aguadulce and Pedregal on 
October 20. 



The following vessels arrived at, or departed from, 
the port of Balboa during the .veck ending Saturday, 
October 18, 1913: 

Arrivals — October 13, Barracoula. from Central 
.America; October 13. Pachitea, from southern ports; 
October 13, Guatemala, from southern ports; Oc- 
tober 14, Pennsylvania, from .San Francisco: October 
14, Quito, from southern and intermediate points. 

Departures — October l.i. L'cayati, to Callao; Oc- 
tober 13, Palena, to southern ports; October 17, 
City ol Para, to northern ports; October 11, Ecuador, to 
southern ports. 



CANAL 




RECORD 



Volume VII. 



ANCON, CANAL ZONE, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 29, 1913. 



No. 10. 



The Canal Record 

Published weekly under the authority and supervision of 
the Isthmian Canal Commission. 



The Canal Record is published free of char tie. one copy 
each to all employes oj the Commission and Panama 
Railroad Company whose names are on the gold roll. 
Extra copies and back numbers can be obtained from the 
news stands of the Panama Railroad Company for five 
cents each. 



Address all Communications, 

THE CANAL RECORD, 

Ancon, Canal Zone, 

Isthmus of Panama. 

No communication, either for publication or requesting 
information, will receive attention unless signed with the 
full name and address of the writer. 

NOTES OF PROGRESS. 



Water Supply from Mirafiores Lake. 

The rise of Mirafiores Lake has necessitated 
the abandonment of the pumping station for 
the Cocoli reservoir, west of Mirafiores Locks, 
and water is now being taken from the lake 
near Mirafiores passenger station. The fioor 
of the Cocoli station was 37.6 feet above sea- 
level. A concrete bulkhead four and a half 
feet high was built around the building to 
protect it until the surface of the lake had 
reached elevation 41 feet. When the water 
reached elevation 39.3 feet it flooded over the 
spillway of the reservoir, and Cocoli Lake is 
now a part of Mirafiores Lake. 

The two pumps in the Cocoli station were 
transferred to the temporary pump station 
at Mirafiores, about 250 feet southwest of the 
permanent station, now under construction. 
One was closed down on October 16, and 
started at its new location at 6 p. m., Sunday, 
October 19; the other was removed on Octo- 
ber 18, and started at Mirafiores at 4 p. m.. 
October 22. Each is a 10-inch, three-stage, 
turbine pump, with a registered capacity of 
1,500 gallons per minute. They supply 
through a 16-inch discharge pipe to the main 
from the Rio Grande reservoir to Panama. 
A Venturi meter installed near the juncture 
indicates that the two sources together are 
supplying about 7,000,000 gallons per day to 
the Canal work and villages south of the con- 
tinental divide, and the city of Panama. .•Xp- 
proximately 70 per cent of this comes from 
Mirafiores Lake. 

Excavation at the site of the permanent 
purification plant in connection with the 
water supply, on the hill overlooking Mira- 
fiores spillway, is being carried on by night 
and day shifts. 



Trial of Steel Couplings for Dredge Pipelines. 

Trial will be made of a metal coupling for 
use on the pipelines of the Commission suction 
dredges, and if they meet the test, the use of 
the pretent rubber sleeves will probably be 



discarded. The coupling is all steel, does 
away with clamps and attachments necessary 
to fasten the rubber sleeve to the pipe, and it 
is claimed that after once installed, there will 
be practically no expense for maintenance. 
The rubber sleeves give trouble constantly, 
and their upkeep is a considerable item. 
The steel device is known as the Parker Uni- 
versal coupling, and requisition has been 
made for six for use on 20-inch pipe. 



Increase of Pupils and Staff in Schools. 

Contrary to expectations some months ago, 
the work in the Canal Zone schools since the 
beginning of the new school year has shown 
an increase over last year. On October 7, 
there was an average daily attendance in the 
schools for white children of 1,005, as com- 
pared with 94U.6 in June, 1913, and an average 
daily attendance in the schools for colored 
children of 817, as compared with 706.5 in 
June. The work of the high schools has 
also increased, and it has been found 
necessary to recreate the position of super- 
visor of the high school and grammar 
grades, and to employ an additional teacher 
in the high school, whose time will be devoted 
to the teaching of English and history. A 
rearrangement has been made in the high 
school hours of study, which allows the 
pupils more time for their lessons. Under 
the new schedule, the morning session at 
the Ancon high school is from 8.30 to 11.50, 
and the afternoon session from 1.20 to 2.40. 
Formerly, there was only the daily morning 
session, from 8.30 to 11. At the Empire high 
school, the new hours are from 8.30 to 11 in 
tlie forenoon, and from 1.40 to 3.40 in the 
afternoon. There was formerly only the 
afternoon session, from 1.50 to 3.40. The 
schedule is arranged to fit closely with the 
arrival and departure of trains carrying pupils 
who reside at other points. The shortening 
of the present noon hours at all .-.chools, now 
rather long, is being given con'^ideration. 



Crematory Building. 

A one-story frame building to house the 
two-retort crematory described in The 
Canal Record of July 30, 1913, will be erect- 
ed by the Chief Quartermaster's construction 
forces. It will be situated near the sexton's 
office in Ancon cemetery, and is designated 
for temporary use only, as the site of the grave- 
yard will probably be changed within the 
next year or so. The building will be 35 
by 39 feet in plan, and will contain four rooms 
divided by wooden partitions, one for re- 
ceiving, one for the incinerator, one to house 
the machinery, and the other to be used for 
storing supplies. The floor will be of cement. 
The crematory apparatus will be installed 
under the supervision of an expert furnished 
by the contractor, the .Upi"' iin|inefring 
Company of Boston. 



DREDGING CULEBRA CUT. 

Vessels from Atlantic and Pacific Entrances 
Working Together In Removal of Slides. 

Excavation of a navigable channel through 
the foot of Cucaracha slide was begun at 
6 p. m., Sunday, October 26, by pipeline suc- 
tion dredge No. 85. The dredge was brought 
up to the south end of Culebra Cut from the 
Pacific entrance during the forenoon of Oc- 
tober 24. During the same morning, a barge 
surmounted by trestle work, which had been 
held in the chamber of Pedro Miguel Lock 
since October 15, was towed to Bridge 57^ 
of the Panama railroad, crossing the Cut about 
1,000 feet north of the lock, for the removal 
of the girder span through which vessels 
are to make passage until the bridge is de- 
molished. Earlier plans had reckoned on a 
surface elevation of 68 feet in the Cut at the 
time of removing the span, but the trestle 
work on the barge was reconstructed, and the 
span was towed aside during the morning of 
October 25, when the surface was at 63.08 
feet above sealevel. The dredge reached the 
slide at 10.40 a.m. of that day. Connection of 
its discharge pipe, floated on pontoons, was 
made with the relay pumping station on the 
west bank of the Canal, 2,500 feet south of the 
slide, by 3 p. m. Preliminary pumping, for 
test and adjustment, began directly after- 
ward, and first excavation was made in the 
evening of October 26. 

In its passage from the Pacific to the Cut, 
the dredge was towed by the tug Mirafiores. 
Accompanying them were the steam launches 
Birdena and Louise, towing a lighter for re- 
pair parts and a fuel oil lighter, and clap»t 
No. 9. and steam launch No. 26, towing seven 
sections, each about 250 feet in length, of 
the 20-inch discharge pipe for the dredge, 
arranged in parallel on pontoons. The tows 
entered the lower chamber of Mirafiores 
Locks at 9.04 a. m., the upper level at 9.45, 
and Mirafiores Lake at 10.20. Passing 
across Mirafiores Lake, the foremost vessels 
entered the east flight at Pedro Miguel Lock 
at about 11.10, and passed into Culebra Cut 
at 11.52 a. m. 

The tug, clapet, and two of the launches 
returned directly to the Pacific entrance, 
passing out of the lower end of Mirafiores 
Locks at about 1.50 p. m. The third launch, 
the Louise, remained in the Cut, just south of 
Bridge 57|,to handle the dredging equipment 
through the trestle and to the slide. 

With its work in the Cut, dredge No. S5 
will have served in each of the three primary 
divisions of the Canal, namely, the Atlantic, 
Pacific, and Central. From the beginning of 
its seri-ice, in 1909, to April, 1910, it worked 
in the Atlanric entrance and in supplyinj 
spoil from the south side of Gatun Dam 
for the hydraulic core. J ust before the closing 
of the West Diversion at Gatun, effected on 
April 24, 1910, the dredge was towed through 
it to the lake side of the dam. it supplied 



90 



THE CANAL RECORD 



Vol. VII, No. 10. 



hydraulic spoil until July, 1912, when it was 
stranded on the toe of the west wing of the 
dam, by raising and then lowering the lalce 
surface, in order that it might be dismantled 
and transferred by train to the Pacific en- 
trance. Rebuilt at the Balboa shipj'ard, it 
began excavation in the inner harbor in No- 
vember, 1912, and was engaged there, ex- 
cavating over 2,000,000 cubic yards, until 
its transfer to Culebra Cut. 

The tug Miraflores is distinguished as the 



only Isthmian Canal Commission vessel 
equipped with wireless telegraph. The ap- 
paratus was installed in 1912 by the com- 
mander of the vessel, Mr. Neil Langvardt, at 
his own expense, to provide means of com- 
munication while the Miraflores was engaged 
in the sand service from Punta Chame. The 
commander was his own operator, having 
learned the operation of the system while on 
his annual leave. The launch Louise is one 
of the relics of the French work, rebuilt by 



LABOR FORCE AND QUARTERS IN SEPTEMBER. 

The force report for September 24 shows the actual working force of the Canal Commis- 
sion to be 32,266; of the Panama railroad, 5,234, and of the contractors, 2,282, a total effec- 
tive working force of 39,782 men, a decrease of 3,103 as compared with the statement for 
August. The gold force on the Canal work, composed almost exclusively of white Americans, 
was 4,524, an increase of 437, as compared with the previous month. A statement of the 
Canal force, by divisions, follows: 













SILVER EMPLOYES* 










i 

o 

(- 


1 
1 




Department or 


Artisans. 


European 
laborers. 


West Indian 
laborers. 


1 

B 

J 


Division. 


c 
o 

2 


T 

8 


3 


c 
342 


o 


2 




2 


o 

04 


i 


2 

g 


3 

o 


c 
o 


Construction & 

Engineering 
Civil Admin.. . . 


4.173 

lis 

64.' 
00- 
68[ 

c 


I.36-. 


3,777 


2.954 


743 


77 


434 


6,561 


2.462 


230 


23.133 

llx 

972 

3.541 

70.; 

7 

4 


2.817 

277 

323 

223 

48 

15 

83 


25.950 
.'95 






i 


7 

-.5; 


3 

33-' 
2 


5 
516 

1 










7 
i9i 


1,085 


2 
17 
20 


1 2'iS 


Ou^^te^maste^'s 


3 


2 






3.764 
7^3 
















22 


Examination of 




















87 




1,749 

01- 








77 
9^ 


4i4 
14' 










Total 


6 528 
6.9-- 





4.209 


2.98.' 


745 
800 


6,966 


3.855 


t269 


28.48C 


3,786 


32.266 


Month previous. 


4.7 U 


3;14<l 


7.2"n 


4,63- 


t Y> 5 


309'8 


4 0S7 


' s .nn.s 



L C. C. force. .'^,266; Panama railroad force, 3.81 , 1 .i;iama railroad commissary force, 1,424. Total, 37.5GO. 
♦All wages specified are in gold, fincludes six at five cents.. {Includes four at five cents. 

The force report of the Department of Construction and Engineering, including the em- 
ployes of contractors, as of September 24, was, as follows; 





SILVER EMPLOYES* 


> 
'to 

2 


a 
2 

(2 






Artisans. 


European 
laborers. 


West Indian 
laborers. 


~i 


Division. 


3 

1 

s 


C 
a. 


I 

c 

1 


c 
a> 
'.> 
tf. 

77 
22 
29 
14 


a 
o 

o 

r.1 




3 

g 

o 


3 


2 

B 

O 


3 
c 

V 





s 


1 





5 


Chief Engineer. 
Mechanical Div. 
Atlantic Div. . . 
Central Division 
U.S. Steel Prod- 


2.855 
151 
533 
63 J 


1,012 

83 

17.' 

92 


2.790 
302 
393 
292 


1,336 
16 

422 
l.lSO 


461 

2 

184 

96 


18 

"59 


40 

86 
3C8 


4.511 

1,2K9 

428 

333 


86 
52 
177 
1,371 


tll9 
14 
18 
79 


14.286 
1.915 
2.444 
4,45^ 

197 

12 

1.640 


1.566 
712 
224 
315 

209 

3 

221 


15.852 
2.057 
2.668 
4.773 

406 


Chicago House 
Wrecking Co 

McClintic - Mar- 
shall Co 


















• 










15 




























1.861 






8 
9 


8 
9 


342 

175 




3.777 


2.9.^-: 
















Total 


4.173 


1.360 


743 
797 


77 

91 


434 
141 


6.561 


2,462 1230 


23.133 


2.817 


25.950 


Month previous 


4.615 


1.480 


4.126 


3 Oi 


6.9n,« 


3.07211257 


25. .303 


3.110 


28.413 



*AU wages specified are in gold, tincludts four at five cents. {Includes three at five cents. 

QUARTERS. 

A report of Commission and Panama railroad quarters occupied on September 



30, follows: 



PlACE. 


Gold. 


Europeans. 


West Indictns. 




Men 


Women 


Chil- 
dren 


Men 


Women 


Chil- 
dren 


Men 


Women 


Chil- 
dren 


Balboa 


465 

590 

833 

3 

245 

176 

354 

787 

148 

72 

603 

980 

SO 

69 


36 
308 
236 


44 
237 
173 


SOS 

6 

58 + 

8' 

325 

168 

367 

392 

30 

65 

985 

144 

91 

119* 






909 
920 
58(1' 
232 
161 
255 
34S 
572 
240 
236 
1.056 
1,46-;' 
320 
284 






Ancon' 






7 
8 
4 


5 








5 


M iraflores 






4 




75 

76 

145 

279 

98 

42 

201 

411 

10 

24 


93 

83 

154 

295 

128 

47 

20s 

472 

11 

19 








Pini?o 


5 
47 
45 
20 
10 
20 


14 
8S 
79 
41 
17 
24 


109 
97 
156 
158 

57 

20 

234 


159 




149 




246 


Las Cascadas 


184 


Bas Obispo 


70 


Gatun 


12 




378 










Porto Bello 


1 


2 


2 


4 






Total 


5,375 


1,941 


1,964 


3,790 


148 


265 


7.583 


852 


1.216 







(1) Indudo Sabanas police station. T.iboga Island, Culebra Island. Palo Seco. and Naos Island. (2) Includes 
74 Panamanians, (3) Includes eight Asiatirs. (4) Includes Colon Beach, and Colon Hospital. (5) Includes 46 
East Indians. II American citizens and, 65 Panamanians. (6) Includes 19 Asiatics. Gold force of contractors (in- 
cluded abov^i \9 limiiiea, and 439 bacbelora. 



the Americans. It was formerly La Petite 
Louise, and is best remembered by older 
employes for its services in the communica- 
tion with the sanitarium on Taboga Island. 
Clapet No. 9 and launch No. 26, also relics 
of the French, towing the pontoons loaded 
with discharge pipe for the dredge, were 
commanded in group by Laurent Roquebert, 
foreman of dredges in the Pacific section, 
who has the record of the longest Canal service 
of any of the employes. He came to the 
Isthmus for the first French company in 1885, 
and has worked ever since at dredging about 
the Pacific end, for the two French com- 
panies, for the Panama railroad in the main- 
tenance of the channel to its wharves, and for 
the Isthmian Canal Commission. 

NORTH OF THE SLIDE. 

The first dredging in Culebra Cut was begun 
on Thursday, October 23, at the bases of the 
east and west Culebra slides, about 2,000 
feet on the other side of Gold Hill, from Cu- 
caracha slide, by ladder dredge No. 1 and 
the dipper dredges Chagres and Mindi, which 
which were brought from the Atlantic en- 
trance and across Gatun Lake on October 22. 
These slides, pushing toward the center of the 
Canal from either side, have narrowed the 
channel to a clear passage of about 90 feet 
width. It is believed that the three dredges 
will be able to maintain the channel and 
clear the Cut at this point without difficulty. 
They are ser\cd by six dump barges, each of 
400 cubic yards capacity, which the tugs 
Bohio, Empire, and Gatun handle to and from 
the dumping grounds in the old course of the 
Chagres, opposite Gamboa bridge and below 
the line of the Canal. The tows are made 
up by the tender DeLesseps. 

RISE OF SURFACE IN SOUTH END. 

Dredge No. 86, which began pumping water 
from the lake side of Cucaracha slide through 
the trench leading to the south end of the Cut 
at midday of October 21, was engaged con- 
tinuously in that work until the morning of 
October 27. Its output, augmenting the nat- 
ural flow through the trench from the lake, 
which increased steadily with the rise of the 
lake, was sufficient to fill the south end of the 
Cut practically to lake level in the night of 
October 26. Dredge No. 86 will begin ex- 
cavating at the foot of Cucaracha slide as 
soon as electrical energy is supplied to the 
pump prepared for it in the relay station. 
The stages on each side of the slide, since 
October 22, at 8 a. m. of each date, have 
been, as follows: 



North 
side* 



South 
sidet 



Thursday. October 23 71.71 

Friday. October 24 71.39 

Saturday. October 25 71.53 

Sunday. October 26 71.67 

Monday, October 27 71 . 78 

Tuesday. October 28 71.92 



56.02 
59.61 
63.08 
67,03 
71,23 
71,90 



*Gamboa gage, same as Gatun Lake. 
tGage at north end Pedro Miguel Lock. 

WORK AT GAMBOA. 

The old French ladder dredge No. 5 had 
excavated to the morning of October 29, a 
channel through the dike at Gamboa, 150 feet 
wide with bottom 10 feet above the Canal 
bottom, giving a clear draft of over 21 feet 
at present. It is estimated that the dredge 
will have the channel entirely clear within 
a month. 



Lost — At Pedro Miguel, on Friday, October 24. 
gold seal ring with red camelian stone. Reward, if re- 
tumed.to.L._W. Taswell, Jr., Culebra. 



October 29, 1913. 



THE CANAL RECORD 



91 



TABOGA SANITARIUM. 



Institution To Be Placed Entirely on a Pay Basis 
After November 1. 
An arrangement has been approved, effect- 
ive November 1, whereby all employes of the 
Canal Commission and Panama railroad, and 
of contractors having hospital privileges, who 
are recommended for a stay at Taboga sani- 
tarium by the physicians at Ancon and Cojon 
hospitals, and who elect to go there, will be 
charged the rates in force for members of 
employes' families. It is to be borne in mind 
that the trip to Taboga will be wholly option- 
al with the patient, and in case he gees, he will 
be given the usual sick certificate covering 
his stay. A circular, published in The 
Canal Record of August 13, 1913, gives 
the rates that are now charged dependent 
members of employes' families, which, for 
adults, two or more assigned to one room, is 
$1.50 per day, and for adults occupying a 
room to themselves at their own request, 
$2 a day. 

The new plan is for the purpose of making 
the sanitarium as far as possible self-sustaining. 
The total expenditures of the institution dur- 
ing the fiscal year ending June 30, 1913, 
amounted to $32,469.41, not including any 
portion of the cost of operating the launch 
Sanidad. The res'enues for the same period 
amounted to 59,706.96. 

The number of employes in the sanitarium 
on June 30, 1912, was 59; number admitted 
during the fiscal year 1912-13, was 1,953, 
and of members of their families, 1,189, a 
total of 3,201. This was about 700 less than 
the total for the fiscal year 1911-12. The 
number of Americans who received treatment 
during the last fiscal year was 2,586; all 
others, consisting principally of Spaniards, 
Greeks, and Italians, 615; total, 3,210. The 
average number of days' treatment per em- 
ploye for the year was 6.71; average number 
of persons constantly sick 36.06; number of 
days' relief furnished patients 21,165, and 
cost of subsistence per patient per day, 
$0,674, as compared with $0,651 for the pre- 
ceding fiscal year. 

♦ 

Additional Seismic Movements. 
Another pronounced earthquake shock was 
experienced at 10.02 a. m., on Thursday, 
October 23, following a period of about 10 
days during which only one tremor was re- 
corded. The movement was felt generally 
over this part of the Isthmus, and its in- 
tensity, according to the Ros^i-Forel scale, 
I to X, was estimated at IV'. All seismo- 
graph pens at the Ancon and Gatun stations 
were thrown off the sheets, so the reco.-d of 
maximum amplitude was lost, but the seismo- 
graph at Gatun showed a movement of 115 
mm. CO the north before the pen left the 
sheet. The duration of the shock is esti- 
mated at from 15 to 20 seconds. The in- 
struments indicated the same distance as 
heretofore, namely, a point about 115 miles 
from Ancon, probably southwest, which 
would bring the epicenter off the coast 
of Los Santos province. Telegraph advices 
received from towns in Los Santos and 
Code provinces show that the last pro- 
nounced shock, while severe there, did not 
accomplish any great amount of damage. 
At Anton and Penonome, some buildings 
threatened to collapse, and in Los Santos 
village, the schoolchildren became panic- 
stricken, and in the hurry to leave the build- 
ing, several of the smaller pupils were 



trampled on and injured. Up to Monday, 
October 27, there had been a total of iH move- 
ments registered by the instrument at Ancon 
in the present series, which began on October 
1. Three tremors occurred on the 24th, one 
on the 25th, and another on the 26th. 

A report received from Messrs. W. C. 
Johnston and D. F. MacDonald, who went to 
Los Santos province on O.-tober 7 to inve ti- 
gate the cause of the earthquakes at the re- 
quest of the Panama Government, states that 
the disturbances appear to have their origin 
in the vicinity of two mountain peaks, known 
as<3uetna and Canajagua, the former h.aving 
an altitude of about 3,000 feet. Their study 
of this locality leads them to believe that the 
shocks are caused by breaks in the earth at a 
distance below the surface, resulting in sub- 
terranean slides and displacements. The in- 
vestigators found no sign of volcanic activity. 
They also announced their belief that the 
movements will end about the middle of No- 
vember, when the forces of the sun and moon 
will cease to work in conjunction. They ad- 
vise that reports of damage have been con- 
siderably exaggerated, and that only the roofs 
of some old adobe houses have suffered. 



PERSf^NAL. 



The Hon. Lindley i\l. Garrison, accom- 
panied by Mrs. Garrison, Brigadier Gen- 
eral Erasmus i\I. Wea\-er, U. S. A., member of 
the General Staff, and Chief of the Coast 
Artillery, and Mr. and Mrs. W. R. Pedigo, 
arrived on the steamship Colon, which docked 
at about 9.30 a. m., Tuesday, October 28. 
He called on President Porras at 4 p. m., on 
the same day, also on the American Minister, 
and was afterward taken on an automobile 
trip to Old Panama, and around the city, vis- 
iting the famous fiat arch in Santo Domingo 
church. He began an inspection of the Canal 
work on Wednesday, October 29. During 
their stay on the Isthmus, Secretary and Mrs. 
Garrison will be the guests of Colonel and 
Mrs. Goethals at Culebra. 

Capt. Courtland Ni.xon returned to the 
Isthmus on the Colon, on Tuesday, October 
28, from his annual leave of absence. 

Lieut. Geo. R. Goethals, accompanied by 
Mrs. Goethals, will sail for New York on the 
United Fruit Company's steamer Zacapa, on 
Thursday, October 30, on vacation leave. 

Mr. J. VV. Collier, Member of Congress 
from Mississippi, arrived on the Isthmus on 
the Crislotai, on October IS, on a sightseeing 
trip to the Canal. He returned to New York 
on the same vessel on October 25. 

Judge S. E. Blackburn, accompanied by his 
family, sailed for New \ ork on the Cristobal, 
on Saturday, October 25, on annual leave of 
absence. 

Mr. Chas. R. Williams sailed for New York 
on the Panama, on Wednesday, October 22, 
on vacation leave. 



Kni^Lts oi Columous. 

The recently